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Full text of "Williamsport Area Community College catalog, 1985-86"

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The Williamsport Area Community College, 

A Two-Year, Co-Educational, 

Publicly-Supported Institution Serving 

Northcentral Pennsylvania, Fully-Accredited 

Member of Middle States Association of 

Colleges and Secondary Schools 




The Williamsport Area Community College 
1005 West Third Street 
Williamsport, Pennsylvania 17701-5799 
(717) 326-3761 






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CATALOG 1985-86 



Catalog Issue, Vol 17 



Fall 1985, No. 1 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

About The College 

President's Message 1 

Board of Trustees 2 

Admission 3 

Campus and Facilities 8 

Tuition and Fees 9 

Financial Aid 11 

Degrees and Programs 13 

Degrees After Dark 13 

Weekend College 13 

Associate Degrees 14 

Certificates in Special Fields 15 

Divisions and Programs 16 

Associate of Applied Arts and Sciences And 

Certificate Programs 18 

College and University Transfer Programs 73 

Exam Preparation 78 

Course Descriptions 80 

Student Services 116 

Campus Life 117 

Academic Information 119 

Developmental Studies 129 

Center For Lifelong Education 130 

Secondary Vocational Program 131 

Commencement Awards 132 

Advisory Committees 134 

Staff 139 

Index of Courses 143 

General Index 146 

Calendar 148 

Campus Map - inside back cover 



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ABOUT THE COLLEGE 



History 

1914- A small industrial arts shop opened at the Williamsport High 

School. 

1920- A full-time adult day school and an evening school were 

established. 

1941 -The Williamsport Technical Institute was formed, encompassing 

both the adult and high school programs. 

1965- The Williamsport Area Community College was established by 

expanding the programming of the Williamsport Technical Institute to 

include a larger range of community needs. 

1981 -The College dedicated three new buildings constructed under 

Stage I of the building improvement program. 

1984— The College dedicated the new Lifelong Education Center. 

1985— The College broke ground for the new Advanced Technology and 

Health Sciences Center. 

Today 

The Williamsport Area Community College serves over 20,000 people a 
year through a diverse range of programs and courses. The College 
offers: 

*Fifty-seven programs leading to associate degrees or certificates in 
vocational and technical fields and in the liberal arts and sciences. 

•Vocational training for secondary students. 

•Courses tailored to meet the needs of business and industry for 
employee training. 

*A broad range of avocational courses offered both on-campus and at 
off-campus sites. 

Backed by a tradition of excellence in technical education, the College 
has gained a national reputation for the diversity and quality of its 
occupational programs. Of the more than 4000 students a year enrolled 
in associate degree and certificate programs, about 92 percent are in a 
technical or occupational area 

The College's programs are housed on five campuses: the central 
campus in Williamsport, the Earth Science Center in 
Allenwood/ Montgomery, the Aviation Center, adjacent to the Lycoming 
County Airport in Montoursville, the Danville State Farm Laboratory, and 
the North Campus, located near Wellsboro. Courses are also offered at 
locations throughout the College's service area. 

In 1985, the College broke ground for the new Advanced Technology 
and Health Sciences Center. This building will expand our ability to 
provide training in a "new generation" of technology — including fiber 
optics, automated manufacturing, robotics and laser technology. Our 
progress— in programming and campus development— reflects our 
commitment to meeting the emerging needs of our students and the 
region we serve. 



The provisions of this catalog are not to be considered an irrevocable 
contract between the student and the College. The Williamsport Area 
Community College reserves the right to change any fees, requirements 
and regulations at any time within the student's term of enrollment at the 
College. 

Students are responsible for meeting in full the requirements for 
graduation set forth by the College. The student's advisor assists in the 
planning of a program, but the final responsibility for meeting the 
requirements for graduation rests with the student. 

The Williamsport Area Community College does not discriminate on the 
basis of age, sex, handicap, race, religion, creed, national origin, veteran 
status or political affiliation. Student inquiries concerning Title VI, IX and 
Section 504 compliance should be directed to the Title VI, IX and 
Section 504 Coordinator, Lawrence W. Emery, Jr., Room 157-F, LRC, 
The Williamsport Area Community College, 1005 West Third Street, 
Williamsport, PA 17701-5799, (717) 327-4765, or to the Director of the 
Office of Civil Rights, Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights, 
Washington, D.C. 20201 




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PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 

Today, more than ever, education is the key to 
building a vital and satisfying future — both for individuals 
and for their communities. 

At The Williamsport Area Community College you'll 
find opportunities to develop your abilities, to build new 
skills, to acquire the "tools" that can help you build your 
own future. 

Over the past year your Community College has 
expanded the training opportunities available in the 
advanced technologies and adapted a number of 
programs to better meet emerging needs. This year, 
you'll find we offer you more opportunities — and more 
resources — than ever before in our history. 

This catalog describes many of these resources— our 
programs, courses and services. You'll find opportunities 
to prepare for a variety of careers and the chance to 
begin working toward a four-year degree. 

Whatever your goal, I invite you to explore our 
resources and make full use of the opportunities we 
offer. They're designed to help you meet the 
challenges — and the opportunities — of tomorrow's 
world. 



Robert L. Breuder 
President 



© 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



On behalf of the Board of Trustees, I welcome you to The Williamsport Area 
Community College. We hope you'll take advantage of the many opportunities for 
personal growth and professional development available. Being a part of the 
College is an exciting experience— we invite you to share it. 

Kathryn W. Lumley 
Chairperson, Board of Trustees 
Jersey Shore 




LESTER L. LESSIG/VICE CHAIRPERSON, 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES; Williamsport 

LOUIS S. EISEMAN/SECRETARY, 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES; Williamsport 

DR. JOHN H. BONE 
Jersey Shore 




MARIO CALDERA 

South Williamsport 

HARRY B. DIETRICK 
Dushore 

WESLEY S. DODGE 
Williamsport 




DR. PAUL F. KLENS 
Mill Hall 

W. JACK LEWIS 
Millville 

PAUL A. PAULHAMUS 
Williamsport 




C. WILLIAM SICK 
Dushore 

QUENTIN S. SNOOK 
Mifflinburg 

ROBERT E. SWARTZLANDER 
Dalmatia 



© 



ADMISSION 




Admission Policy 

At The Williamsport Area Community College we are 
committed to serving the educational needs of students 
from all walks of life. The College operates under an 
"open-door" admissions policy and is open to anyone 
with a high school diploma or its equivalent. Anyone age 
18 or older who does not have a high school diploma or 
the equivalent may be admitted as a "special student." 

Acceptance to several programs of study is based upon 
the applicant's meeting the requirements (including 
necessary academic skills and prerequisites) of the 
specific program of study. The College reserves the r.ght 
to deny admission or readmission to any student if, in 
the opinion of College authorities, his/her admission is 
not in the best interest of the student or the College. 

The Williamsport Area Community College offers equal 
opportunity for admission without regard to age, race, 
color, creed, sex, national origin, handicap, or veteran 
status. 

The College will provide opportunities to develop the 
basic skills necessary to enroll in associate degree and 
certificate courses to those who demonstrate such needs 
on the College's placement tests. 



© 



ADMISSION 



Acceptance and Admission Preference 

The Williamsport Area Community College will accept 
students based on the date the applicant's file (i.e., 
application for admission, application fee, 
transcripts/GED, and, when appropriate, testing 
material) is completed in the Admissions Office, with the 
exception that sponsor district applicants whose files are 
complete by the dates below will have preference for 
admission. 

The College will grant preference for admission to 
residents of sponsor districts until February 1 for the fall 
semester and until October 1 for the spring semester. 



Admission Procedure 

All graduates of accredited secondary schools in the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania are eligible for 
admission to the College as regular students. Admission 
into a specific program is based upon evidence of 
scholastic readiness for the program. 

1. Application and Application Fee 

All applicants to degree and certificate programs must 
submit an "Application for Admission" form together 
with a non-refundable application fee. This fee is 
charged only once. The Director of Admissions, upon 
written request from a counselor, state agency, etc. 
has the authority to waive the fee when it can be 
determined that the fee causes financial hardship to 
an individual. 

2. High School Graduation 

a. High school students must submit a partial 
transcript during their senior year. However, a final 
transcript of high school credits or proof of graduation 
from an approved or accredited high school with a 
four-year course of study must be on file before a 
student can attend classes. 

b. High school graduates must submit a final transcript 
of high school credits or proof of graduation from an 
approved or accredited high school with a four-year 
course of study. 

c. Applicants age 18 or older may be admitted to the 
College on the basis of an equivalency diploma, 
provided that the applicant has earned a minimum 
General Equivalency Diploma (GED) test score average 



© 



of 45. Under special circumstances, applicants 17 
years of age may be considered for admission with a 
minimum GED test score average of 45. 

d. Anyone age 18 or older who has not met the 
requirements of sections a., b., or c. above may be 
considered for admission into a program as a "special 
student" provided he/she has the appropriate 
aptitudes and abilities to enter the College. 

e. Early Admission: a student of exceptional ability 
who has completed the eleventh grade in an 
accredited high school may enroll at the College as a 
full-time or part-time student in either a degree or 
certificate program during what would normally be the 
senior year of high school. For a student to qualify for 
early admission, the chief administrative officer of the 
student's high school must approve and submit the 
"Admissions Application" together with an official 
high school transcript, to the College Admissions 
Office. The Admissions Office will determine whether 
the student is eligible for the specific degree or 
certificate program desired. Upon satisfactory 
completion of the first year in a full-time college 
program, an early admission student can qualify for a 
regular high school diploma. 

3. Placement Examinations 

To insure that applicants have the entry-level skills 
needed for their programs, all students are required to 
take the College's placement examinations. The 
College uses these examinations to assess applicants' 
skills in math, English and reading. Based on the 
results of their tests, students will be placed in the 
appropriate math, English, and reading courses. The 
College reserves the right to recommend another 
program or require developmental courses if the test 
results indicate that an applicant does not have the 
required academic entry skills. Applicants who have 
demonstrated academic proficiency through either 
previous college course work or College Boards (SAT 
or ACT) may be exempt from testing. 



4. Health Records Requirement 

A student who may need special accommodations due 
to a physical or mental disability/ handicap must 
submit his/her medical history on a health record 
card. (Health record cards are available from the 
College's Admissions Office.) The health card should 
be submitted well in advance of the term in which the 
student plans to enroll to allow the College to prepare 
for any special needs. The card must be received 
before the student can begin classes. A disability or 



ADMISSION 



handicap will not be used to deny a person admission 
to the College. 

5. Tuition Deposit and Tuition Payment 

All full-time applicants who have been accepted as 
degree-seeking or certificate-seeking students must 
submit a $100 tuition deposit. The tuition deposit will 
be credited to the student's tuition for the first 
semester. If the student does not enroll and notifies 
the College by the pre-determined deadline, the 
College will refund 80 percent of the tuition deposit. 

The tuition deposit will hold a space in class until the 
announced deadline. Students who have not met their 
total financial obligations for the semester by the 
deadline will forfeit their class space. As a result 
someone from the College's waiting list may take their 
space in the program. 

6. Additional Requirements 

In addition to the College's general admission policies 
and requirements, applicants to the Aviation 
Maintenance Technician, Aviation Technology, Dental 
Hygiene, Mathematical Computer Science, Surgical 
Technology, Practical Nursing, and Radiography 
programs must also meet the following requirements: 

a. All applicants must have graduated from an 
accredited secondary school or have successfully 
completed the General Equivalency Diploma 
Examination (GED). 

b. All applicants must successfully complete the 
College's placement tests. All deficiencies, when 
identified through testing, must be made up by the 
designated time. 

c. All qualified applicants (except for applicants to the 
aviation programs) must discuss their career choice 
and their expectations of the program during an 
interview. A hospital observation is required for 
applicants to the Radiography program. 

d. Practical Nursing applicants must take additional 
standardized tests. Dental Hygiene and Practical 
Nursing applicants are required to take the S.A.T. 
tests. Test results will be used by the College in 
determining final acceptance to these programs. 

e. Dental Hygiene and Practical Nursing students must 
complete the required physical examination forms 
prior to the first day of classes. Accepted Dental 
Hygiene and Practical Nursing students must be in 
good health to begin classes. 




Admission of International Students 

The Williamsport Area Community College believes that 
the presence of international students on campus will 
enrich the educational environment for all students. The 
College is authorized under Federal law to enroll non- 
immigrant alien students on "F-l" student visas. An 
"Application for Admission" and all supporting 
documents must be received in the Admissions Office at 
least two weeks prior to the day of late registration for 
the term in which the student plans to enroll. 

All transcripts, test scores, and other credentials become 
the property of the College and will not be returned or 
transferred to another institution. 

In addition to the College's general admission 
requirements, international students must fulfill the 
following requirements: 

LAN international students whose native language is not 
English are required to take the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL). 

2. Applicants must submit an affidavit of support for 
themselves and for all members of their family who 
will accompany them to Williamsport. The affidavit 
certifies that the applicant has adequate funds to 
attend college and will not become a public charge. 
Failure to provide this information may result in the 
denial of the applicant's application for an "F-l" 
student visa. 



© 



ADMISSION 



3. All international students who are accepted must take 
the College's placement tests. Placement into the 
appropriate level of courses will be determined by the 
tests. International students must arrange to be on 
campus approximately one week prior to registration 
for the term in which they are enrolling. Failure to 
complete placement tests may result in denial of 
acceptance into programs. 

4. International students must become familiar with the 
regulations of the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service and assume responsibility for complying with 
test regulations. 

Reenrollment 

Former students who wish to reenroll must apply for 
readmission through the Admissions Office. They do not 
have to submit an application fee. They may be required 
to submit a health records card. (See Health Records 
Requirement on page 4.) 

1. A student who: 

a. reenrolls in the same program in which he/she was 
last enrolled, and 

b. reenrolls less than two years after he/she last 
attended the College, 

may be required to meet graduation requirements in 
effect at the time the student was originally enrolled. 

2. A student who: 

a. reenrolls in the same program in which he/she was 
last enrolled, and 

b. reenrolls two or more years after he/she last 
attended the College, 

rrrustmeet current graduation requirements. All course 
work previously completed will be reviewed on a 
course by course basis to determine whether it meets 
current graduation requirements. All courses 
completed will remain on the student's transcript. 
Only credits for courses which meet the current 
program requirements will be used in calculating the 
student's cumulative grade point average. 

3. If a student reenrolls in a program different from the 
one in which he/she was last enrolled, each course 
previously taken will be evaluated to determine 
whether it meets the requirements of the new 
program. Only credits for courses which meet the 
requirements of the current program will be used in 



© 



calculating the student's cumulative grade point 
average. However, all courses completed will remain 
on the student's transcript. Students reenrolling in a 
new program are required to meet the graduation 
requirements for the new program in effect at the time 
they reenroll. 

Special circumstances may be appealed to the Dean 
of Academic Affairs or his/her designee, who may 
waive the conditions given above. 



Change of Program 

A change of program may be made at the beginning of 
any semester. Currently enrolled students who wish to 
change from one program of study to another must 
follow the steps below: 

1. Complete an "Admissions Application" and submit it 
to the Admissions Office. Acceptance into the new 
program will be based on sponsorship status and on 
the date the applicant's file is complete in the 
Admissions Office. 

2. Complete a "Curriculum Change" form; obtain all 
required signatures (advisor, counseling, division 
director, financial aid, admissions). Submit the form to 
the Student Records Office. 

When a student changes his/her program, all credits 
earned in the prior program will be evaluated for transfer 
to the new program. All prior course work will appear on 
the student's transcript. Only courses applicable to the 
new program will be used to calculate the student's new 
cumulative grade point average. 



Transfer Students 

Students from other colleges who wish to transfer to 
The Williamsport Area Community College must follow 
the procedure below: 

1. Complete steps listed under Admission Procedure, 
(see page 4) with the exception of "High School 
Graduation." 

2. Ask all college(s) previously attended to send an 
official transcript to The Williamsport Area Community 
College Admissions Office. The College may also 
request a high school transcript. 

3. Provide course descriptions or a college catalog to the 
Admissions Office for use in evaluating courses 
completed at another institution. 



ADMISSION 



Transfer Credit 

Transfer credit includes: credit for courses earned at 
another institution, college credit earned before high 
school graduation, service credit, United States Armed 
Forces Institute (USAFI) credit, and credit earned 
through the College Level Examination Program (CLEP). 

A maximum of 30 transfer credits may be applied toward 
a degree or certificate. Courses to be considered for 
transfer must have been completed with a grade of "C" 
or better. However, if a student earns a cumulative "C" 
average or better in sequential courses (for example, 
English 1 and English 2) an exception may be made 
based on the evaluation of the courses. Courses taken 
more than two years before the student enrolls at The 
Williamsport Area Community College may be evaluated 
(on a course-by-course basis) to determine if they are 
equivalent to courses currently required in the student's 
program. A copy of the evaluation of transfer credit will 
be sent to the student. 

All transfer credit will appear on the student's transcript 
after the student successfully completes one semester of 
academic work at The Williamsport Area Community 
College. Transfer credit will appear on the transcript with 
credit value only. Transfer students will enroll without 
any cumulative grade point average. A student must be 
enrolled in courses at The Williamsport Area Community 
College for at least the last 12 credit hours of his/her 
program. Requirements for the evaluation of different 
forms of transfer credit are listed below. 

1. Transfer from Another Institution 

All credits earned at a previously attended 
institution(s) will be evaluated for transfer credit. The 
student must send The Williamsport Area Community 
College Admissions Office an official catalog 
description of each course to be evaluated and a 
description of the grading codes (if the grade codes 
are not defined on the transcript) from each institution 
from which courses are to be evaluated. These 
materials must consist of either of the following: the 
institution's catalog or a photocopy of the course 
descriptions and the grade codes description taken 
from the institution's catalog. 

2. College Credit Earned Before High School Graduation 

College credit earned before high school graduation 
will be evaluated only if the college where the work 
was taken issues an official college transcript. 
Students who have earned college credit before 



graduation from high school must follow the 
procedure defined under "Transfer from Another 
Institution." 

3. Service Credit 

Veterans who have served 12 consecutive months of 
active military duty will be granted credit for health 
and/or physical education (if required in their 
program). The student must submit a copy of his/her 
report of separation (DD-214) and complete a waiver 
for physical education with the Health Sciences 
Office. 

4. United States Armed Forces Institute Credit (USAFI) 

The College may grant credit for USAFI credit. An 
official transcript must be mailed directly from USAFI 
in Madison, Wisconsin to the College's Admissions 
Office. Credit will be granted for those courses which 
are substantially comparable to courses offered at The 
Williamsport Area Community College. If the student's 
program includes electives, elective credit will be 
granted for those courses which are not comparable. 

5. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

The College will examine CLEP results and may grant 
college credit to individuals who score at least in the 
fiftieth percentile rank on the CLEP exam. The student 
must provide an official copy of his/her CLEP scores 
to the College's Admissions Office. The College will 
determine whether credit earned through CLEP will be 
issued for required credit courses or as elective credit. 



Non-Degree Students 

A student who does not wish to pursue a degree or 
certificate program is a non-degree student. Such 
students are permitted to select courses without regard 
to degree or certificate requirements. If at a later date, a 
non-degree student desires to enroll in a specific degree 
or certificate program, an application for admission to 
the program, together with any other required 
credentials, must be submitted to the Admissions Office. 

Non-degree students are not eligible for financial aid. 
They are permitted to schedule classes on a first- 
come/first-served basis (after currently enrolled students 
have been given the opportunity to schedule classes). 
Non-degree students must complete an "Admissions 
Application" form the first time they schedule credit 
classes, but are not required to pay the application fee. 



© 



ADMISSION 



Transfer Of Credits To Four- Year 
Institutions 

The Williamsport Area Community College has 
established formal agreements with Lock Haven, 
Mansfield, Kutztown and Millerville Universities and with 
Rochester Institute of Technology allowing, under 
certain conditions, the transfer of associate degree 
graduates into these institutions with junior-level status. 

The College is also negotiating formal agreements with 
the following colleges and universities: 

Bloomsburg University 
Wilkes College 

If you would like detailed information about the 
transferability of specific courses or programs, please 
consult your division director. 



Housing 

Students are responsible for making their own housing 
arrangements. The Admissions Office, Academic Center, 
Room 104, maintains a list of area housing facilities for 
men and women. Prospective students are urged to 
make arrangements for housing as soon as possible after 
being admitted. A brochure containing guidelines on 
obtaining housing is available. The College does not 
sponsor, approve, disapprove, evaluate or supervise the 
listed facilities. Any agreement for renting is solely 
between the landlord and student. 



Health Services 

Student Health Services is staffed by a registered nurse 
and is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 3:30 
p.m. during the fall and spring semesters. First aid, 
health counseling, and assistance in obtaining private 
health care and student insurance is available. Costs for 
private health care are the student's responsibility. 
Student Health Services is located on the first floor of 
the Gymnasium, Room 104. 



Student Retention Data 

Persons interested in obtaining data on student retention 
(number of students who enroll at the College and 
number who actually complete their program) should 
contact the Registrar/ Director of Institutional Research, 
Academic Center, Room 110. 



CAMPUS AND FACILITIES 

In addition to its Central Campus in Williamsport, the 
College offers credit programs at the following locations: 

Aviation Center - Adjacent to Williamsport/ Lycoming 
County Airport in Montoursville 

Aviation Maintenance Technician 
Aviation Technology 

Danville State Farm Laboratory - South of Danville on 
Route 11, North 

Agribusiness 

Dairy Herd Management 

Earth Science Center - South of Williamsport on 
Route 15 

Agribusiness 

Dairy Herd Management 

Floriculture 

Forest Technology 

Nursery Management 

Outdoor Power Equipment 

Service and Operation of Heavy Construction 

Equipment 
Wood Products Technology 

North Campus 

The North Campus of The Williamsport Area Community 
College is located on Route 6 between Wellsboro and 
Mansfield. Students may enroll in degree programs in 
Accounting, Business Management, Computer 
Information Systems, Electronics (1986), General Studies 
and Secretarial Office Administration, or in the 
certificate program in Practical Nursing. Students may 
also participate in the Cooperative Education program. 

The North Campus offers a flexible schedule of day and 
evening courses throughout the year. Students, 
including those enrolled in programs on the College's 
Williamsport Campus and non-degree students, may 
enroll in individual courses at the North Campus. 

A variety of non-credit courses are also offered 
throughout the year. 

Students applying for admission to programs offered at 
the North Campus must follow the College's Admission 
Procedures (see page 4). The policies, procedures, 
tuition and programs for students enrolled at the North 
Campus are the same as those for students at the 
central campus in Williamsport. 

Anyone interested in more information on the North 
Campus should contact the North Campus/ RD 3, Box 
436/ Wellsboro, PA 16901/ (717) 724-7703. 

For additional information on the College's facilities, 
including access for the handicapped, contact the Office 
of Admissions, Academic Center, Room 104. 



TUITION AND FEES 



TUITION AND FEES 

Full-Time Students 

State regulations define a full-time student as anyone 
enrolled for 12 or more credit-hours per semester. 
However, tuition and related fees are based solely on the 
number of credits for which you are enrolled, as 
described below. 

Application Fee 

Applicants for status as full-time students in degree or 
certificate programs must include a non-refundable $15 
application fee with their "Admission Application." You 
are required to pay this non-refundable fee only once. 

Tuition Deposit 

All applicants who have been accepted as full-time 
degree or certificate students must pay a $100 tuition 
deposit to hold a class reservation in the first semester 
for which they have applied. 

If you enroll at the designated time, the deposit will be 
credited to your tuition for the first semester. If you do 
not enroll and notify the College by the pre-determined 
deadline, the College will refund 80 percent of the tuition 
deposit. 

Tuition and Related Fees- 1985-86* 

Tuition and related fees are governed by your area of 
residence and are based on a per credit hour charge. To 
calculate your tuition and fees for one semester, multiply 
the number of credits for which you are enrolled by the 
total per credit charge under the appropriate residence 
category. The four categories of residence and the 
tuition and fees for each are: 

1. District Sponsoring The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

A sponsor district is one which contributes to the 
financial support of the College. If you reside in a 
district which sponsors The Williamsport Area 
Community College, you must secure a Certificate of 
Sponsorship in order to be eligible for sponsoring 
district tuition rates. The form should be mailed to the 
Bursar's Office after you have been accepted and as 
soon as possible prior to registration. 



Tuition 
Service Fee 
Activity Fee 
TOTAL 



PER CREDIT HOUR CHARGE 

$41.45 

none 

$ 1.25 

$42.70 



2. District Sponsoring Another Community College 

If you reside in a district which sponsors another 
Pennsylvania community college, you must obtain 
permission, IN WRITING, from the Board of Trustees 
of the other community college in order to qualify for 
sponsoring district tuition and fees. If you do not 
obtain permission, you will be charged the same 
tuition and fees as non-sponsor students. 



Tuition 
Service Fee 
Activity Fee 
TOTAL 



PER CREDIT HOUR CHARGE 
$41.45 
$ 8.65 
$ 1.25 
$51.35 



3. Non-Sponsoring Pennsylvania District 

If you reside in a Pennsylvania district which does not 
sponsor a Pennsylvania community college, you will 
pay the following tuition and fees: 

•Tuition and Fees are subject to change without 
notice. 



Tuition 
Service Fee 
Activity Fee 
TOTAL 



PER CREDIT HOUR CHARGE 
$88.89 
$ 8.65 
$ 1.25 
$98.79 



4. Out-of State Resident 

Out-of-state students will pay the following tuition and 
fees: 



Tuition 
Service Fee 
Activity Fee 
TOTAL 



PER CREDIT HOUR CHARGE 
$118.24 
$ 17.30 
$ 1.25 
$136.79 



NOTE: Tuition and related fees for 1985-86 are subject 
to final approval of the College's budget. 



Deferred Payment 

The College shall not knowingly accept a partial 
payment from any student except as required for tuition 
deposits, financial aid plans, or within the guidelines 
established by the Board of Trustees' policy for deferred 
fee status (given below). 

Any student whose fee is in arrears after the first day of 
classes shall be subject to a $20 deferred processing fee. 



® 



TUITION AND FEES 



Students who are unable to pay tuition and fees in full 
by the due date, may make a partial payment as 
determined by the College and pay the remaining portion 
in two equal installments at 30-day intervals following 
the beginning of the semester. A $20 processing fee will 
be charged for this installment plan. Nullification or 
adjustment of financial aid awards shall not alter the 
student's obligation to complete installment payments to 
the College. 

Students who fail to meet their financial obligations 
under this plan shall be administratively withdrawn. 
Such termination will not cancel the student's financial 
obligation to the College. Students participating in an 
installment plan will have their grades and transcripts 
held until their accounts are settled. 



Books and Supplies 

Expenses for books and supplies will vary considerably 
from program to program. The College tries to keep 
expenses as low as possible by operating the College 
Bookstore on a low-cost basis. For full-time students the 
cost for books and supplies can be as high as $300 per 
semester. 



Tools 

When you have been accepted in a particular program, 
the Admissions Office will provide you with a list of 
required tools. We recommend that you do not buy any 
tools or protective clothing for any course before 
attending the first class. Tool costs vary greatly, 
depending on your program. Prospective students 
should contact the Admissions Office for a list of 
estimated tool costs for each program. The tools will be 
your personal property. In many cases, students will use 
these tools throughout their careers. 



Transcripts 

The student's grade report is an unofficial transcript 
(identical to the official transcript but without the official 
seal) which shows all course work completed by the 
student. Students may use their grade report when an 
unofficial transcript is needed. Official transcripts are 
only those transcripts sent to another institution, 
agency, or employer. 

Students will be charged $1.00 for each additional 
transcript. All requests for additional transcripts must be 



® 



submitted in writing to the Student Records Office. The 
request must contain the following information: the 
student's name while attending The Williamsport Area 
Community College, the student's address and social 
security number, the dates of enrollment, the name of 
the program(s) in which the student was enrolled, and a 
complete address to which the transcript is to be sent. If 
the transcript is sent to the student or to his/her 
address, it is considered an unofficial copy. 



Graduation Fees 

Any students who wish to receive an engraved diploma 
or certificate when they graduate must pay a $5.00 fee 
when they petition to graduate. If a student orders a 
diploma or certificate after the advertised date for 
ordering a diploma (i.e., two months prior to the date of 
graduation), the student must pay a special processing 
fee of $10.00. 

If a graduating student does not wish to receive an 
engraved certificate or diploma, he/she will not be 
charged the graduation fee but must still file a petition. 
(See Petition to Graduate on page 126.) 



Refunds 

Students who terminate enrollment at the College or 
withdraw from a course(s) may obtain a refund or partial 
refund of tuition, service fees and activity fees if they 
follow the procedures below. 

If a student finds it necessary to terminate or to 
withdraw from the College for any reason, the student 
must: 

1. Officially terminate or withdraw by presenting to the 
Student Records Office a signed, properly executed 
"Student Status Change" form(s). 

2. If the student is also applying for a refund, the 
"Request for Refund" form must be filled out and 
submitted with the "Student Status Change" form(s). 

3. Satisfactorily account for all property issued by the 
College. 

4. Settle all outstanding College obligations. 

No refunds will be issued unless a student completes the 
above steps and initiates them within the proper time 
frame. 

Charges for tuition, activity fees and service fees are 
refundable upon proper official withdrawal or termination 
from the College. Application fees are not refundable. A 
"Request for Refund" form can be obtained from the 



TUITION AND FEES 



Bursar's Office. In order to obtain a refund, the 
"Request for Refund" form and the necessary "Student 
Status Change" forms must be submitted at the same 
time. 

Refunds of tuition and feees will be made according to 
the following schedule for fall and spring semesters: 



Prior to the first day of classes 
First day through third week 
After third week of classes 



100% Refund 

70% Refund 

No Refund 



Refunds will be made according to the following 
schedule for the summer semesters and for courses that 
do not meet for the entire semester (for example, some 
weekend college clases and "mini-courses," eight-week 
courses, etc.). 

Prior to the first day of classes 100% Refund 

First day through 20% of total 70% Refund 

instructional hours 

After 20% of total instructional hours No Refund 

For additional information on termination and withdrawal 
policies, please see "Terminations, Withdrawals, and 
Refunds" in the Academic Information section of this 
Catalog. 




FINANCIAL AID 



Recognizing that the cost of education is often greater 
than the student and his/her family can afford without 
help, the Financial Aid Office helps students obtain 
financial assistance through a variety of aid programs: 

Grants 

Scholarships 

Loans 

College Work-Study Program 

Veteran's Benefits 

Vocational Rehabilitation Sponsorship 

Part-Time Employment 

Every student is encouraged to thoroughly explore each 
of the above programs, and to contact the Financial Aid 
Office for assistance in obtaining and completing 
applications for aid. 



Employment 

Students interested in part-time employment other than 
the College Work-Study program should contact the 
Advisement and Career Services Center for further 
information. 



Special Attention 

Deadlines 

Students who want the fullest consideration for all 
awards should have all needed application materials 
complete and on file in the Financial Aid Office as soon 
as possible. For the 1986-87 year, for example, 
completed applications for some forms of aid should be 
filed by March 1, 1986. Applications received after this 
date will be processed and students filing late will be 
considered for aid, but only after other applications 
received by the deadline have been reviewed and awards 
made. 

An exception to the above deadline is made for the 
Guaranteed Student Loan Program. Loan applications 
may be submitted at any time during the year, but 
should be filed early enough to allow for the six to eight 
week processing time prior to loan approval and release 
of funds to the applicant. 

Need Analysis Forms 

To determine a student's financial eligibility for awards, 
especially Supplemental Grants and College Work-Study 
awards, a review of the family financial situation must 
be completed. 



® 



FINANCIAL AID 



The College uses the Pennsylvania Higher Education 
Assistance Agency system for need analysis purposes. 
These forms can be obtained from the College's 
Financial Aid Office, high schools and the state agency. 

Policy on Satisfactory Academic Progress 

This policy applies to all students receiving financial aid 
from federal or state student assistance programs: 

Federal Programs ( Pell/ SEOG/ College Work 
Study/ Guaranteed Student Loan/ Plus Loan): 

A full-time student who receives aid from the Pell, 
SEOG, or College Work Study programs must make 
satisfactory academic progress in order to continue to be 
eligible for aid. Students shall be considered to be 
making satisfactory progress if, based on academic 
achievement, the College allows them to continue their 
enrollment, provided that they successfully complete at 
least 24 credits by the end of the first academic year. 

Students whose cumulative grade point average falls 
below 2.00 will be placed on academic probation, and a 
decision on their continued enrollment will be made by 
the Probation Committee. Students on academic 
probation may continue to receive financial aid, provided 
they successfully complete at least 24 credits by the end 
of the first academic year. 

After receiving aid for the fourth semester of a two-year 
program or the second semester of a one-year program 
the student will not be eligible for additional aid until 
after graduation from the program. In addition, any 
student who changes programs two or more times will 
be determined ineligible pending further review. 

Any part-time student who receives aid and who fails, 
withdraws from, or receives an incomplete in two or 
more courses in which he/she was enrolled during an 
academic year (or the equivalent) shall be ineligible for 
further aid until he/she completes courses equivalent in 
credits to the number which were not successfully 
completed. 

Credits earned through advanced placement or life 
experience and external transfer credits may be used to 
meet graduation requirements, but may not be included 
in the number needed for satisfactory progress for 
financial aid purposes. 



© 



Students determined to be ineligible for additional aid 
may appeal this determination by writing to the Director 
of Financial Aid or his/her designee, stating the basis for 
appeal. Exceptions may be made based on extenuating 
circumstances including, but not limited to, documented 
illness, change of program, or the required completion 
of Developmental Studies courses. The Director or 
designee will inform the student in writing of the 
decision, specifying the duration of time or other 
conditions under which an exception has been made, or 
explaining the reason for denying the appeal and 
detailing the actions necessary for the student to regain 
eligibility. A student may request a review of the 
decision in a meeting of the student, Director of 
Financial Aid and the Dean of Student Services. 

State Program (PHEAA): 

PHEAA regulations require that for each year of a 
PHEAA grant, a student must successfully complete 24 
credits, otherwise the student will be ineligible to receive 
additional grants. Appeals must be made directly to 
PHEAA. This policy is subject to revision by PHEAA. 

Amnesty (For Federal Programs) 

For returning students who have not been enrolled 
during the past five years, prior academic performance 
will not be considered when satisfactory academic 
progress is measured. 

NOTE: 

SEOG = Supplemental Educational Opportunity 

Grant 
CWS = College Work-Study Program 
PHEAA = Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance 

Agency 
GSL = Guaranteed Student Loan 

PLUS = Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students 




FINANCIAL AID 



Veterans Information/ Benefits 

The College has been approved for the education and 
training of veterans. The Financial Aid Office provides 
counseling and assistance to veterans. All veterans must 
register in the Financial Aid Office in order to collect G.I. 
benefits or to initiate action concerning the Veterans' 
Administration. Veterans should bring a copy of their 
DD 214 and, when applicable, their marriage certificate 
and children's birth certificates, to the Financial Aid 
Office for their first interview. The Financial Aid Office 
maintains a complete supply of forms for such purposes. 

The College does not handle advance payment requests. 



Additional Information and Assistance 
with Applications 

Additional information about all of the financial aid 
programs listed above is available from the Financial Aid 
Office at the address below. We advise you to request a 
copy of the College's Financial Aid Brochure, which 
provides more information about all of these programs. 
For information and applications, call, write, or visit: 

Financial Aid Office 

The Wi/liamsport Area Community College 

1005 West Third Street 

Wi/liamsport, Pennsylvania 17701 

(717)327-4766 



DEGREES 

AND 

PROGRAMS 




DEGREES AFTER DARK 

Degrees After Dark offers employed students and those 
with other daytime responsibilities the opportunity to 
earn a degree by attending classes in the late afternoon 
and evening. Programs currently offered through 
Degrees After Dark (as well as during the day) include: 

Accounting 

Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration 

Automotive Mechanics 

Automotive Technology 

Business Management 

Computer Information Systems 

Electronic Technology 

Retail Management 

Secretarial Office Administration 

Welding 

Word Processing 

General Studies 

Individual Studies 

For more information on Degrees After Dark, contact 
the Office of Admissions (717) 327-4761. 



WEEKEND COLLEGE 

The Weekend College program offers students the 
opportunity to take associate degree courses on the 
weekends. Courses available through the program vary 



DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 



from semester to semester, but usually include a variety 
of courses in business and computer technology plus 
selected courses in the liberal arts and the technologies. 

Weekend College also offers a number of scheduling 
options, including: 

Saturday classes which meet three hours a week for 
16 weeks. 

Concentrated study courses which meet on Friday 
evenings, on Saturdays, and on Sunday mornings for 
four consecutive weekends. 

Courses which meet every third weekend on Friday 
evenings, on Saturdays, and on Sundays. 

For more information on Weekend College, contact the 
College's Business and Computer Technologies Division 
at (717) 326-3761, ext. 225, or the Office of Admissions 
at (717) 327-4761. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREES 

The Williamsport Area Community College awards three 
types of associate degrees. Associate degree programs 
can help you prepare for employment or serve as the 
basis for additional education. Associate degree 
programs require a minimum of 60 credits. 

The Associate of Applied Arts (AAA) is offered in 
Advertising Art, Broadcasting and Journalism. These 
programs offer students the opportunity to gain the 
technical and professional skills needed for employment 
and to prepare for transfer to a four-year college. 

The Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree 
programs offer students the opportunity to gain the 
technical and occupational skills needed for 
employment. These programs also prepare students for 
transfer to four-year colleges. 

The Associate of Arts (AA) degree programs are 
designed to parallel the first two years of a liberal arts 
education at a four-year college. Credits earned can 
usually be transferred toward the first two years of a 
bachelor's degree. 



Associate of Applied Arts 

The Associate of Applied Arts programs offer knowledge 
and skills in programs emphasizing communications. 



® 



Each program has prescribed courses that you must 
complete in order to graduate. 

The College offers Associate of Applied Arts (AAA) 
degrees in the following areas: 

Integrated Studies 

Advertising Art 

Broadcasting 

Journalism 



Associate of Applied Science 

If you want to gain knowledge and skills in a technical 
or occupational area, you can earn an Associate of 
Applied Science degree. Each program has prescribed 
courses that you must complete in order to graduate. 

The College offers Associate of Applied Science (AAS) 
degrees in the following areas: 

Business and Computer Technologies 

Accounting 

Business Management 

Computer Information Systems 

Retail Management 

Secretarial Office Administration 

Executive 

Legal 

Medical 
Word Processing 

Construction Technology 

Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration 
Architectural Technology 
Building Construction Technology 
Electrical Technology 

Health Sciences 

Dental Hygiene 

Dietetic Technician 

Food & Hospitality Management 

Radiography 

Industrial Technology 

Civil Engineering Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Engineering Drafting Technology 
Machine Tool Technology 
Tool Design Technology 



DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 



Integrated Studies 

Graphic Arts 
Human Service 

Mathematical Computer Science 
Technical Illustration 
Technology Studies 

Natural Resources Management 

Agribusiness 
Floriculture 
Forest Technology 
Nursery Management 
Wood Products Technology 

Transportation Technology 

Automotive Technology 
Aviation Technology 
Diesel Technology 



Associate of Arts 

(College and University Transfer) 

The General Studies and Individual Studies 
Programs 

The Williamsport Area Community College offers an 
Associate of Arts (AA) degree in both the General 
Studies Program and the Individual Studies Program. 
Both programs are designed to provide the student with 
the opportunity to: 

1. Participate in a planned educational program of 
studies leading to an Associate Degree. 

2. Elect, from a broad range of courses, those courses 
most appropriate to individual academic and career 
goals. 

3. Interact on a regular basis with the College staff and 
fellow students in the cultural, social, and recreational 
activities that lead to intellectual growth and emotional 
maturity. 

4. Demonstrate a mastery of basic mathematic concepts 
and skills. 

5. Display in written and verbal presentations the ability 
to communicate clearly, correctly, and convincingly. 

The General Studies Program is designed primarily for 
transfer to four-year college degree programs. (For 
additional information on transfer, see Transfer of 
Credits to Four-year Institutions on page 8.) It provides 
the opportunity to begin academic course work leading 



to many professional careers. Specific curriculum guides 
have been developed in the following career areas: 

Business Administration 
Communications Emphasis 
Education Emphasis 
Math-Science Emphasis 
Pre-Law Emphasis 
Pre-Medical Emphasis 
Pre-Theological Emphasis 

The Individual Studies program offers students the 
maximum flexibility in designing an associate degree 
program to meet his or her needs. The Individual 
Studies program also offers students waiting for an 
opening in a particular career-oriented program the 
opportunity to begin work leading to a degree. 

CERTIFICATE IN SPECIAL FIELD OF 
STUDY 

These programs are occupational in nature and heavily 
skills oriented. They are not primarily designed for 
transfer but in certain cases can be transferred to some 
colleges. Certificate programs vary in length, but do not 
exceed two years of course work. 

A feature of these Certificate in Special Field of Study 
programs is the optional elective. As the name implies, 
an optional elective can be chosen to broaden the basic 
academic work required of all college students. You are 
urged to make use of the opportunity to enrich your 
educational experience. 

Certificates are offered in the following areas: 

Business and Computer Technologies 

Clerical Studies 
Computer Operator 

Construction Technology 

Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration 
Construction Carpentry 
Electrical Occupations 
Plumbing and Heating 

Health Sciences 

Practical Nursing 

Quantity Food Production & Service 

Surgical Technology 

Industrial Technology 

Industrial Drafting 
Machinist General 
Welding 



DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 



Integrated Studies 

Printing 

Natural Resources Management 

Dairy Herd Management 

Outdoor Power Equipment 

Service & Operation of Heavy Construction Equipment 

Transportation Technology 

Auto Body Repair 
Automotive Mechanics 
Aviation Maintenance Technician 
Diesel Mechanics 

DIVISIONS AND PROGRAMS 

BUSINESS & COMPUTER TECHNOLOGIES 

Division Director, Dr. Donald B. Bergerstock 
Assistant Director, Thomas C. Leitzel 

Accounting (BA) 

Business Management (BM) 

Clerical Studies (BT) 

Computer Information Systems (CS) 

Computer Operator (CO) 

Retail Management (RM) 

Secretarial Office Administration (SA) 

Executive 

Legal 

Medical 
Word Processing (WP) 
College & University Transfer Program 

Business Administration 
Exam Preparation 

Real Estate 

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 

Division Director, Dr. Ralph Home 

Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration (RA/RC) 
Architectural Technology (AT) 
Building Construction Technology (CB) 
Construction Carpentry (CO 
Electrical Occupations (EO) 
Electrical Technology (EL) 
Plumbing and Heating (PL) 

HEALTH SCIENCES 

Division Director, Davie Jane Nestarick 

Dental Hygiene (DH) 

Dietetic Technician (DT) 

Food & Hospitality Management (FH) 

Practical Nursing (NU) 



® 



Quantity Food Production & Service (QF) 
Radiography (RT) 
Surgical Technology (ST) 
Service Courses 

Medical Terminology 

Fitness and Lifetime Sports 

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

Division Director, Dr. George A. Baker 

Civil Engineering Technology (CT) 
Electronics Technology (ET) 
Engineering Drafting Technology (ED) 
Industrial Drafting (ID) 
Machine Tool Technology (TT) 
Machinist General (MG) 
Tool Design Technology (TD) 
Welding (WE) 

INTEGRATED STUDIES 

Division Director, Dr. Daniel J. Doyle 
Assistant Director, Dr. Robert W. Wolfe 

Advertising Art (AR) 

Broadcasting (BR) 

Graphic Arts (GA) 

Human Service (HS) 

Journalism (JO) 

Mathematical Computer Science (MC) 

Printing (GP) 

Technical Illustration (Tl) 

Technology Studies (TS) 

Service Courses 

Advertising 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Economics 

Education 

English 

Environmental Science 

Geography 

Geology 

German 

Government 

History 

Mathematics 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Spanish 



DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 




NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT 

Division Director, Dr. Wayne Longbrake 

Agribusiness (AG) 

Dairy Herd Management (DY) 

Floriculture (FL) 

Forest Technology (FR) 

Nursery Management (NM) 

Outdoor Power Equipment (SM) 

Service & Operation of Heavy Construction 

Equipment (SO) 
Wood Products Technology (WD) 

TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY 

Division Director, William H. Debolt 

Auto Body Repair (AB) 
Automotive Mechanics (AM) 
Automotive Technology (AU) 
Aviation Maintenance Technician (AC) 
Aviation Technology (AD) 
Diesel Mechanics (DM) 
Diesel Technology (DD) 

COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY TRANSFER PROGRAMS 

Dr. Daniel J. Doyle 

General Studies 

Communications Emphasis 
Education Emphasis 
Math-Science Emphasis 
Pre-Law Emphasis 
Pre-Medical Emphasis 
Pre-Theological Emphasis 

Individual Studies 



CENTER FOR LIFELONG EDUCATION 

Director, Barbara A. Danko 

Non-Credit Courses & Programs 
Specialized Business & Industrial Programs 
Service Agency and Certification Programs 

Exam Preparation 

Engineer In Training 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (CED) 

Director of Experiential Learning, William C. Bradshaw 

Courses in conjunction with Divisions and Programs 

DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES 

Director, R. Dean Foster 

COPing Program 
Developmental Studies Courses 

SECONDARY VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS 

Director (Vacant) 

Auto Body Repair 

Automotive Mechanics 

Aviation Maintenance Technician 

Carpentry 

Cooperative Education (CAPSTONE) 

Cosmetology 

Drafting - Architectural/Mechanical 

Electrical Construction 

Forestry 

Health Assistant 

Horticulture 

Machine Shop 

Quantity Food Production and Service 

Small Engine Repair 

Welding 



® 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



ACCOUNTING (BA) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



FIRST SEMESTER 


ACC 


112 


Accounting 1* 


MGT 


110 


Principles of Business* 


MGT 


111 


Business Mathematics 


SEC 


111 


Typewriting 1 


ENL 


111 


English Composition 1 


PED 




Fitness it Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 



This program offers a broad business background with a 
specialization in accounting. It begins on the elementary levels 
of accounting and business and advances to more complex 
levels. 

Types of Jobs: Public, private, government, and corporate 
accounting, cost accounting, tax consultant, auditor, comptroller. 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_1 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
_3 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 

15 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 
"Equivalent AIB (American Institute of Banking) courses may be 
substituted with Division Approval. 

Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 

EVENING PROGRAM 

Courses required for the associate degree in Accounting are 
also offered in the evenings and on weekends for the 
convenience of students who are unable to attend weekday 
classes. Students may complete all courses required for a 
degree in Accounting by enrolling in evening and weekend 
courses on a part-time basis. Part-time students may require 
more than two years to complete the program. 



18 



ACC 


122 


Accounting II 


ACC 


125 


Income Tax Accounting 


CSC 


118 


Fundamentals of Computer Science* 


MGT 


230 


Business Communications 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-Social Science/ Humanities 


THIRD SEMESTER 


ACC 


231 


Cost Accounting 


ACC 


232 


Intermediate Accounting I 


MGT 


231 


Business Law I* 
Elective-Computer Science* 
Elective* 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

ACC 244 Intermediate Accounting II 
MGT 241 Business Law II 
ECO 201 Principles of Economics* 
ENL 202 Fundamentals of Speech 
Elective* 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Accounting program is to prepare 
the student for employment in the accounting field- public, 
private, and government. The program will also upgrade the 
skills of those now employed in this field. 

The graduate should be able to: 

1 . identify and apply generally accepted accounting principles. 

2. organize, prepare, and interpret financial data and 
statements. 

3. demonstrate skill in effective verbal and written 
communication. 

4. use and interpret federal and state income tax laws 
applicable to the individual and sole proprietor. 

5. identify, use and interpret cost accounting information. 

6. identify the laws which affect business. 

7. apply computer knowledge and techniques in the 
preparation and analysis of financial statements and data. 

8. apply human relations skills in the business environment. 

9. apply general knowledge of the social sciences and 
understand their effect on our society. 

10. identify the need for physical fitness and positive leisure 
activities. 




ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



ADVERTISING ART (AR) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program prepares students for employment in advertising 
art and related fields. Students develop skills in drawing, 
painting, designing, illustrating, coloring, paste-up, rendering, 
composing, layout, lettering, sketching, and proper use of 
tools, equipment, and materials. Related courses in journalism, 
photography, graphic arts, and courses in English, 
mathematics, and history increase the student's career 
opportunities. Some prior training in art is desirable. 

Types of Jobs: Advertising artist, art director, layout artist, renderer, 
letterer, illustrator; mechanical work, general board work. 
"GENERAL ELECTIVES are courses chosen from outside your program 
of concentration. 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
_1 

15 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_^ 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 

15 



FIRST SEMESTER 


ART 231 


Color and Design 


EDT 101 


Mechanical Drawing 


GCO 516 


Typographic Composition 


ENL 111 


English Composition I 




Elective - Social Science/ Humanities 


PED 


Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 



ART 


111 


Basic Drawing 


ART 


232 


Lettering and Layout 


ART 


233 


Introduction to Art 


GCO 


525 


Process Camera" 


HIS 


111 


Western Civilization I 


PED 




Fitness Et Lifetime Sports 


THIRD SEMESTER 


ART 


241 


Media and Techniques 


ART 


242 


Advertising Design 


ADV 


101 


Principles of Advertising 


GCO 


526 


Film Assembly and Imposition 


MTH 


101 


Introduction to Mathematics I 




Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 

15 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

ART 121 Basic Painting 
GCO 515 Layout and Design" 
JOU 114 Mass Media Photography 
ENL 202 Fundamentals of Speech 
Elective 



"Courses may be interchanged 

Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 



The general objective of the program is to prepare students for 
jobs in the advertising art field. 

A graduate of the Advertising Art program should be able to: 

1 . demonstrate manipulative skills — including dexterity with 
pen, brush and ink, litho pencil, carbon pencil, pastel, 
airbrush, art aids, and water base pigments. 

2. create product renderings (drawing or paintings) in the 
following mediums: watercolor, designers colors, retouch 
grays, wash, pen and ink, scratchboard, litho pencil, 
carbon pencil, airbrush, benday screens, and other art 
techniques used in preparing mechanicals (finished copies 
used in printing). 

3. draw and sketch product and spot illustrations, the figure, 
and objects from nature. 

4. demonstrate skills in color and design as applied to such 
variables as mass, color elements, shape, space, 
movement, time, and organization. 

5. use lettering and layout skills, such as outline lettering, old 
style, modern and sans serif, free hand lettering, italic, 
brush and comp lettering; indicate type styles and sizes for 
printers. 

6. lay out visual material for reproduction or presentation. 

7. demonstrate desirable attitudes and work habits — creative 
thinking, the ability to solve problems, good artistic 
judgement, industriousness, cooperation, responsibility, 
self-reliance — and an appreciation for and understanding 
of past civilizations. 

8. demonstrate knowledge of printing and publishing, verbal 
and written communications, and advertising. 

9. understand and respect the employer-employee 
relationship, and appreciate the need to produce high 
quality work. 

10. demonstrate knowledge of the relationship between various 
production departments (for example typesetting, the art 
department, camera, etc.) and the contributions each 
makes to the total product or service. 

11. communicate clearly, both verbally and in writing. 

12. demonstrate knowledge of a lifetime sport which will 
provide recreation and promote physical fitness. 

13. demonstrate sufficient understanding of advertising art for 
entry-level employment and advancement in the field. 



® 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



AGRIBUSINESS (AG) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



The Agribusiness program prepares men and women for mid- 
management positions in an agricultural business and for work 
in production agriculture as farm owners or supervisors. 

Types of Jobs: Farm operator or manager; farm supply and garden 

center; feed, seed, and fertilizer sales; farm credit, financing, and 

insurance. 

"GENERAL ELECTIVES are courses chosen from outside your program 

of concentration. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

AGB 111 Introduction to Agricultural Business 

AGB 112 Soils, Fertilizer, and Agricultural Chemicals 

MGT 110 Principles of Business 

ENL 111 English Composition I 

PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 

AGB 123 Field & Forage Crop Production 

AGB 124 Agricultural Financing 

AGB 125 Dairy Production 

MGT 111 Business Mathematics 

MGT 230 Business Communications 

PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



THIRD SEMESTER 

AGB 236 Animal Production 
AGB 237 Special Topics in Agribusiness 
ACC 112 Accounting I 
ENL 202 Fundamentals of Speech 
Elective-General* 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

AGB 240 Internship/Co-op 
AGB 248 Farm Management 
AGB 249 Agricultural Sales and Service 
ECO 201 Principles of Economics 
Elective-General* 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
3 
1 

15 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 

16 

Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
J 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
J 

15 



Co-op Options: 
Parallel 

Summer 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the program is to prepare students for 
jobs in agricultural businesses and to improve and add to the 
skills of students who will return to their home farms. 

A graduate of Agribusiness should be able to: 

1 . write clear, concise, legible, and accurate technical reports. 

2. use skills in verbal communication, speak logically, and use 
various types of communication techniques to promote 
sales and service and to develop leadership skills. 



'2(f 




3. interpret farm records and apply the principles of 
management and economics as they relate to the farm, 
including agribusiness financing and interpreting computer 
print-outs. 

4. analyze procedures involved in breeding, feeding, housing, 
and managing a dairy herd. 

5. describe the physical and biological properties of soil, the 
use and general effects of fertilizer, and the proper use of 
chemicals in crop and livestock production. 

6. identify various types of business organizations and 
business principles — including planning, organizing, 
financing and marketing. 

7. describe the principles of breeding, feeding, marketing, and 
management of beef, swine, sheep, and poultry. 

8. explain the marketing of agricultural products — including 
the psychology of selling and pricing and the importance of 
customer service. 

9. demonstrate an attitude of responsibility toward 
agribusiness and the world of work. 

10. use appropriate math skills to solve applied problems in 
agribusiness. 

11. demonstrate an appreciation of physical fitness and lifelong 
recreational activities. 

12. use microcomputers in farm and agribusiness management 
decision making. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



AIR CONDITIONING/REFRIGERATION (RA) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program provides background knowledge and skills 
training in air conditioning, temperature and humidity control, 
air circulation, duct system design, thermostats, ventilating 
equipment and automatic controls. Students learn to repair 
equipment in the lab segments of the program. The 
combination of lab practice and theory prepares students for 
employment and advancement in today's air conditioning and 
environmental control industry. 

Types of Jobs: Refrigeration and air conditioning equipment 

mechanic, estimator, sales representative, air conditioning lab 

technician, industrial physical plant maintenance and environmental 

control. 

Recommended High School Subjects: Two years of algebra, one 

year of science. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

ACR 511 Introduction to Refrigeration 

ELT 531 Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration Electricity 

MTH 103 College Algebra & Trigonometry I 

ENL 111 English Composition I 



SECOND SEMESTER 

ACR 521 Commercial Refrigeration Systems 

ACR 522 Installation & Service Problems- Commercial 

ELT 541 Electric Motors & Refrigeration Controls 

PHS 500 Physics Survey 

PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 

THIRD SEMESTER 

ACR 231 Theory Et Operation of Air Conditioning &■ 

Heating Systems 
ACR 232 Installation & Service Problems- Air Conditioning 
PSY 1 1 1 General Psychology 
PED Fitness B Lifetime Sports 

Elective-Math/ Computer Science 



Credits 

5 

6 

3 

J 

17 

Credits 
4 
4 
5 
3 
_l 
17 

Credits 

4 
5 
3 

1 

16 




FOURTH SEMESTER 

ACR 241 Air Movement and Ventilation 
Elective-Technical/ Co-op* 

ELT 551 Commercial HVAC Control 

ENL 201 Technical Writing 
Elective-Business 



Credits 
4 
3 
4 
3 
J 

17 



"One technical elective in Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration, for example, 
ACR 242 Solar Heat/ Energy Conservation, will be offered each spring 
semester. Students may also choose an elective from another 
technical associate degree program or enroll in Co-op. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The goal of this program is to prepare students for 
employment in the field of commercial, residential, and 
industrial air conditioning and refrigeration installation, 
maintenance, and service. 

A graduate of the program should be able to: 

1 . demonstrate the ability to do technical work in a variety of 
air conditioning and refrigeration fields; apply safety 
standards and understand and work with technical 
developments in the industry. 

2. apply concepts of algebra and physics in the design, 
development, and analysis of refrigeration and air 
conditioning equipment and systems. 

3. identify and demonstrate correct use of tools, materials, 
and equipment used in the trade. 

4. demonstrate the ability to read and interpret blueprints and 
use blueprints when installing equipment. 

5. troubleshoot air conditioning and refrigeration equipment 
using standard troubleshooting procedures. 

6. write clear, concise, legible, and accurate technical reports 
using standard English and apply verbal communication 
skills in job-related activities. 

7. read and interpret electrical schematics and use schematics 
when installing equipment. 

8. estimate the cost of an installation and design an effective 
system for a specific location and use. 

9. demonstrate a responsible attitude in relationships with 
employers and co-workers and toward the world of work. 

10. demonstrate an awareness of and respect for 
customer/employer relations. 

1 1 . demonstrate knowledge of the operation and use of 
hermetic, reciprocating, and centrifugal compressors. 

12. apply basic knowledge of air flow, ventilation, and energy 
conservation concepts to the design of systems using 
modern building design and solar energy technology. 

13. install and troubleshoot commercial electric, pneumatic, 
and electronic HVAC control systems. 

14. use microcomputers to monitor and control HVAC systems 
in commercial buildings. 



21 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



AIR CONDITIONING/REFRIGERATION (RC) 
Certificate/1 year 



This program provides the training needed to understand and 
work with modern refrigeration installations. During lab 
sessions students troubleshoot and repair the types of 
breakdowns they will find on the job. The program covers air 
conditioning, temperature and humidity control and air 
circulators, and equipment installation — and emphasizes 
commercial reach-in and walk-in refrigeration units. Students 
also take introductory courses in electricity, electric motors 
and refrigeration theory. 

Types of Jobs: Refrigeration equipment mechanic (installation, 
maintenance, repair), refrigeration equipment estimator, equipment 
sales. 



FIRST SEMESTER 








Credits 


ACR 511 


Introduction to Refrigeration 


5 


ELT 531 


Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration Electricity 


6 


MTH 710 


Technical Mathematics I 






or 


3 


MTH 103 


College Algebra & Trigonometry I 




ENL 711 


Communications 






or 


3 


ENL 111 


English Composition I 


17 




® 



SECOND SEMESTER 

ACR 521 Commercial Refrigeration Systems 

ACR 522 Installation & Service Problems- Commercial 

ELT 541 Electric Motors & Refrigeration Controls 

PHS 500 Physics Survey 

PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 



Credits 
4 
4 
5 
3 
J 

17 



The goal of this program is to prepare students for 
employment in the field of residential, commercial, and 
industrial refrigeration installation, maintenance, and service. 

A graduate of the program should be able to: 

1. identify and demonstrate correct use and care of 
refrigeration tools, materials, and equipment. 

2. read and interpret electrical schematics and use schematics 
when installing equipment. 

3. troubleshoot refrigeration equipment using standard 
procedures. 

4. demonstrate familiarity with the accepted safety standards 
and requirements of the industry. 

5. write clear, concise, legible, and accurate memos, work 
orders, and reports. 

6. demonstrate a responsible attitude in relationships with 
employers and co-workers and toward the world of work. 

7. use elementary math operations (addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, division), including decimals, fractions, and 
conversions in refrigeration work. 

8. demonstrate a working knowledge of the service and 
installation of frozen food cabinets, walk-in coolers and ice 
machines used in supermarkets and restaurants. 

9. understand changing air conditioning/refrigeration 
technology and develop new skills when necessary. 

10. demonstrate a knowledge of heat pump installation and 
service. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY (AT) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program offers training in architectural drafting principles 
and practices. Students learn to create residential and 
commercial working drawings. It also includes design 
fundamentals, structural calculations and site planning theory. 

Types of Jobs: Architectural drafting, estimator, detailer, or 
specification writer in private practice, corporate departments, public 
bureaus, construction firms, landscape architecture firms, and 
engineering fields. 

Recommended High School Subjects: Two years of algebra, one 
year of science. 



Credits 
3 
4 
3 
2 
3 
J3 

18 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
_3 

17 

Credits 
5 
5 
3 
3 
_1 

17 



FIRST SEMESTER 


ARC 


111 


Statics 


ARC 


112 


Architectural Graphics I 


ARC 


115 


Working Drawings - Residential 


ARC 


116 


Building Materials I 


ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


MTH 


103 


College Algebra Et Trigonometry I 



SECOND SEMESTER 



ARC 
ARC 
ARC 
ARC 
ENL 
MTH 



122 
121 
125 
232 
121 
104 



Architectural Graphics II 

Structures - Wood 

Working Drawings - Commercial 

Building Materials II 

English Composition II 

College Algebra & Trigonometry II 



THIRD SEMESTER 



ARC 
ARC 
ARC 
ARC 
PED 



236 
237 
238 
233 



Design Studio I 

Seminar in Architectural History 

Structures • Steel 

Building Equipment I 

Fitness Et Lifetime Sports 



FOURTH SEMESTER 



ARC 242 Building Equipment II 

ARC 244 Professional Administration & Contract Documents 

ARC 246 Design Studio II 

ARC 247 Structures - Concrete 

PED Fitness Et Lifetime Sports 



Credits 
3 
3 
6 
3 

16 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Architectural Technology program 
is to give students the academic and practical training needed 
for a variety of careers. Students develop the entry-level skills 
needed for employment as architectural technicians. The 
program may also serve as a basis for additional education in 
such disciplines as architecture, architectural engineering, 
landscape architecture, urban design and planning, interior 
design and building construction. 




A graduate of the Architectural Technology program should be 
able to: 

1. understand and appreciate visual art. 

2. demonstrate a responsible attitude toward the wise and 
efficient use of our natural resources. 

3. demonstrate mastery of the skills needed for architectural 
presentations — including drawing, drafting, and model 
building. 

4. demonstrate knowledge of building structure, materials, 
and methods of construction. 

5. perform first order structural calculations related to wood, 
steel, and concrete. 

6. demonstrate working knowledge of the environmental 
systems of structures (water, air quality, etc.); demonstrate 
skills in designing these systems. 

7. explain professional practice and administration. 

8. demonstrate basic knowledge of architectural design and 
planning. 

9. apply working knowledge of site engineering and design. 

10. demonstrate knowledge of architectural terminology and 
skills in verbal, written and visual communications. 

11. use the mathematical skills needed in this field and math 
skills necessary for the development of visualization skills 
and logical thought processes. 

12. demonstrate knowledge of a lifetime sport which will 
provide recreation and promote physical fitness. 



23 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



AUTO BODY REPAIR (AB) 
Certificate/2 years 



Auto Body Repair prepares students for employment and 
advancement in this field. Students develop skills in using 
tools and equipment through practical experience in the 
College's shop. The program covers the theory and skills of 
sheet metal repair, sanding, and applying fillers, primers and 
paint. It includes skills training in shrinking, stretching and 
welding, panel installation, interior trim and glass replacement. 
Students also develop skills in frame and steering alignment 
and in damage estimating and repair. 

Types of Jobs: Work for insurance companies, repair shops, 
dealerships and self-employment. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

ABC 713 
ABC 714 
MTH 710 



ABC 723 
ABC 724 
ENL 711 



ABC 
ABC 



833 
834 



Basic Auto Body (8 weeks) 
Metal Work (8 weeks) 
Technical Mathematics I 


Credits 

7 
7 
3 




17 


TESTER 

Auto Body Maintenance (8 weeks) 
Panel Alignment (8 weeks) 
Communications 


Credits 

7 
7 
3 




17 


STER 

Metal Work and Filling (8 weeks) 
Painting (8 weeks) 
Optional Elective 


Credits 

7 

7 

0/3 



14/17 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Credits 

ABC 843 Tools, Equipment and Collision Repairs (8 weeks) 7 

ABC 844 Painting and Estimating (8 weeks) 7 

Optional Elective 0/3 

14/17 

Co-op Options: 

Alternating 

Parallel 

Summer 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general goal of this program is to prepare students for 
careers in auto body repair, collision appraisal and shop 
management. 

A graduate of the Auto Body Repair program should be able 
to: 

1. write clear, concise, legible, and accurate repair orders, 
estimates, technical reports, and business letters. 

2. demonstrate skill in basic communication and the ability to 
speak logically; use verbal communication skills in 
promoting sales and service and in developing leadership 
skills. 



24 




3. maintain service records and customer files. 

4. identify factors involved in managing an auto body repair 
shop, including personnel, equipment, and customer 
relations. 

5. diagnose common paint problems and make necessary 
repairs. 

6. make automotive collision repairs to sheet metal 
components. 

7. make repairs to automotive glass, upholstery, trim and 
related components. 

8. demonstrate both efficiency and quality in automotive 
refinishing work. 

9. diagnose and repair mechanical parts, other than sheet 
metal, damaged by collision. 

10. demonstrate a responsible attitude toward auto body repair 
and the world of work. 

11. use basic math skills (addition, subtraction, multiplication, 
division) including decimals, fractions, and conversions in 
auto body repair. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



AUTOMOTIVE MECHANICS (AM) 
Certificate/2 years 



The Automotive program trains students in the skills needed to 
service and repair light commercial and passenger vehicles. 
The program emphasizes both theory and practical skills. 
Students develop skills in power train, steering, brakes, 
ignition, carburetion, engines and electrical components and 
assemblies. 

Types of Jobs: General auto mechanic or technician in a dealership, 
independent garage, fleet operation, service station, self-employment. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

AMT 510 Principles of Engine Systems I (8 weeks) 
AMT 511 Principles of Engine Systems II (8 weeksl 
MTH 710 Technical Mathematics I 



Credits 

6 

6 

J 

15 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Credits 
AMT 520 Principles of Chassis Systems (8 weeks) 6 

AMT 521 Principles of Power Train & Accessories (8 weeks) 6 

ENL 711 Communications 3 

15 



THIRD SEMESTER 

AMT 630 Power Train & Accessories Service (8 weeks) 
AMT 631 Engine System Service (8 weeks) 
Elective 



Credits 

6 

6 

J 

15 




FOURTH SEMESTER 

AMT 640 Chassis System Service (8 weeks) 
Automotive Service Elective* 
Elective 



Credits 

6 

6 

_3 

15 



•Automotive Service Elective - Depending on student interest and 
enrollment, a minimum of one and a maximum of two of the 
following courses will be offered during a given semester. 

AMT 641 Automatic Transmissions and Air Conditioning 

Service (8 weeks) 
AMT 642 Engine and Electrical Overhaul (8 weeks) 
AMT 643 Wheel Alignment and Advanced Chassis Service 

(8 weeks) 

Co-op Options: 

Alternating 

Parallel 

Summer 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The goal of this program is to prepare the student for jobs in 
the automotive field. The program prepares students to take 
written certification exams — for example, the National 
Institute for Automotive Service Excellence exam — and the 
Pennsylvania Vehicle Safety Inspection exams — written and 
practical — for certification as vehicle safety inspectors. 

A graduate of the Automotive program should be able to: 

1. diagnose and repair common malfunctions of systems and 
components on popular makes of automobiles. 

2. diagnose and repair malfunctions and wear in one of the 
following specialized automotive service areas: 

a. engines 

b. automatic transmissions 

c. suspension and chassis 

3. test, adjust and repair engine electrical, fuel and emission 
control components. 

4. interpret wiring diagrams, test and repair starting, charging, 
lighting and accessory systems of vehicles. 

5. use elementary math operations (addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, division) including decimals, fractions, and 
conversions in automotive work. 

6. demonstrate the ability to write letters of application, 
resumes, memos, work orders and reports; recognize 
current forms and styles of the above. 

7. demonstrate a responsible attitude toward the automotive 
service and manufacturing industry and the world of work. 



25 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY (AU) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program covers advanced operating theories of 
automotive systems and components. Students learn to apply 
automotive operating principles and to diagnose malfunctions 
in automotive systems. The program emphasizes the 
development of skills in service, repair and test procedures 
using modern equipment and special tools. Business 
management and specialized service courses prepare students 
for advancement in the automotive field. 

Types of Jobs: Dealership service specialist, assistant manager, 
skilled jobs in automotive manufacturing, service equipment 
representative, rebuilding shop assembler, repair shop operator, parts 
department manager. 

Recommended High School Subjects: One course in algebra for 
career students, two years of algebra for transfer students. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

AMT 510 Principles of Engine Systems I (8 weeks) 
AMT 511 Principles of Engine Systems II (8 weeks) 
ENL 111 English Composition I 
MTH 500 Technical Mathematics (2 yr. career) 

or 
MTH 103 College Algebra B Trigonometry I (4 yr. transfer) 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Principles of Chassis Systems (8 weeks) 
Principles of Power Train & Accessories (8 weeks) 
Mechanical Drawing 
Intermediate Algebra (2 yr. career) 

or 
College Algebra & Trigonometry II (4 yr. transfer) 
Fitness &■ Lifetime Sports 



Credits 
6 
6 
3 



AMT 


520 


AMT 


521 


EDT 


101 


MTH 


105 


MTH 


104 


PED 





18 

Credits 
6 
6 
2 



THIRD SEMESTER 

AMT 630 Power Train and Accessory Service (8 weeks) 

AMT 631 Engine Systems Service (8 weeks) 

ENL 201 Technical Writing 

MGT 247 Small Business Management 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

AMT 640 Chassis Systems Service (8 weeks) 

Automotive Service Elective* 
PHS 500 Physics Survey (2 yr. career) 

or 
PHS 100 Physics Mechanics (4 yr. transfer) 
PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 

Mathematics/Science Sequence 



18 

Credits 

6 

6 

3 

_3 

18 

Credits 
6 
6 

3/4 

1^ 

16/17 



Career 

MTH 500 
MTH 105 
PHS 500 



Technical Math 
Intermediate Algebra 
Physics Survey 



Transfer 

MTH 103 College Algebra it Trigonometry I 

MTH 104 College Algebra ft Trigonometry II 

PHS 100 Physics Mechanics 



It is suggested all math deficiencies (as identified on the College's 
placement exams) be made up prior to enrollment due to the course 
load and technical nature of the program. 

"Automotive Service Elective - Depending on student interest and 
enrollment, a minimum of one and a maximum of two of the 
following courses will be offered during a given semester. 

AMT 641 Automatic Transmissions and Air Conditioning 

Service (8 weeks) 
AMT 642 Engine and Electrical Overhaul (8 weeks) 
AMT 643 Wheel Alignment and Advanced Chassis Service 

(8 weeks) 



Co-op Options: 



Alternating 



Parallel 



Summer 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The goal of this program is to prepare students for jobs in the 
automotive field. The program also prepares students to take 
written certification exams — for example, the National 
Institute for Automotive Service Excellence exam — and the 
Pennsylvania Vehicle Safety Inspection exams — written and 
practical — for certification as vehicle safety inspectors. 

A graduate of Automotive Technology should be able to: 

1. diagnose and repair common malfunctions of systems and 
components on popular makes of automobiles. 

2. diagnose and repair malfunctions and wear in one of the 
following specialized automotive service areas: 

a. engines 

b. automatic transmissions and air conditioning 

c. alignment and suspension 

3. apply basic laws of physics and scientific principles to 
automotive systems and components when diagnosing 
problems and in product development. 

4. record engineering data in mathematical terms and solve 
basic problems using technical mathematics, elementary 
algebra, and trigonometry. 

5. interpret engineering data presented in graphs or charts, 
algebraic expressions, or proportional relationships. 

6. create and interpret basic engineering drawings. 

7. demonstrate knowledge of good management practices, 
including personnel, equipment, shop layout, and customer 
relations, in the automotive service shop. 

8. maintain automotive service records, dealership warranty 
procedures, and customer files. 

9. demonstrate skill in basic verbal communications and the 
ability to speak logically; use various types of verbal 
communication skills in sales and service and in developing 
leadership skills. 

10. write clear, concise, and accurate repair orders, technical 
reports, service advertising copy, business memoranda, 
and business letters. 

11. maintain business records, explain the factors to be 
considered in starting a new business, and state good 
management practices. 

12. demonstrate knowledge of a lifetime sport which will 
provide recreation and promote physical fitness. 

13. demonstrate a responsible attitude toward the automotive 
service and manufacturing industry and the world of work. 



26 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



AVIATION MAINTENANCE 
TECHNICIAN (AC) 
Certificate/2 years 



This program prepares students for employment as aircraft and 
powerplant maintenance technicians. Students develop 
practical skills in aircraft powerplant maintenance and 
troubleshooting. The program also covers powerplant and 
maintenance theory. This program is approved by the Federal 
Aviation Administration, and as a graduate the student will be 
qualified to take the examinations for the Airframe and 
Powerplant Maintenance Certificate. See page 5 for special 
admission requirements for this program. 

Types of Jobs: Maintenance technician for airlines, fixed base 
operators, and manufacturer's services. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

APC 513 Basic Electricity 

APC 514 Federal Air Regulations 

APC 515 Material and Processes 

APC 516 Aircraft Servicing/ Fluid Liners and Fittings 

APC 517 Weight and Balance/ Physics 

APC 518 Turbine Engines 

MTH 515 General Aviation Math 



SECOND SEMESTER 

APC 522 Engine Ignition Systems 

APC 523 Engine Induction and Exhaust Systems 

APC 524 Engine Fuel Systems 

APC 525 Propellers 

APC 526 Reciprocating Engines and Engine Inspection 

EDT 104 Aircraft Drawing 



THIRD SEMESTER 

APC 633 Engine Cooling and Lubricating 

APC 634 Engine Fire Protection and Instruments 

APC 635 Engine Electrical 

APC 636 Aircraft Electrical 

APC 637 Aircraft Covering, Finishes and Welding 

APC 638 Aircraft Assembly and Rigging/ Inspection 



FOURTH SEMESTER 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 

19 

Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 
7 
_2 

20 

Credits 
4 
2 
3 
4 
3 
_3 

19 



APC 642 Aircraft Sheet Metal and Wood Structures 

APC 643 Aircraft Landing Gear, Hydraulics Pneumatics, and 

Position/Warning 
APC 644 Aircraft Communications/ Navigation and Instruments 
APC 645 Aircraft Atmosphere Control and Ice/ Rain Control 
APC 646 Aircraft Fuel and Fire Protection 



Credits 
6 



6 

2 

3 

J 

19 




PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The objective of the Aviation Maintenance Technician program 
is to prepare students to take the written, oral, and practical 
Federal Aviation Administration (F.A.A.) Examination. 
Students master the skills needed for aviation maintenance 
jobs. 

A graduate of the Aviation Maintenance Technician program 
should be able to: 

1. prepare F.A.A. maintenance forms accurately. 

2. locate specific information in various aviation publications. 

3. read and understand aircraft and powerplant service 
publications. 

4. recognize the need for accuracy and thoroughness in work. 

5. demonstrate professional skills in inspection, maintenance 
and repair. 

6. observe and practice safety habits at all times. 

7. demonstrate correct use of basic hand tools, special tools, 
and required testing equipment. 

8. use mathematics and theory in aviation maintenance work. 

9. list, define, and correctly use aviation maintenance 
terminology. 

10. maintain high professional standards — as established by 
the F.A.A. and studied in the program — in aviation 
maintenance work. 



27 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



AVIATION TECHNOLOGY (AD) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program prepares students for employment and 
advancement in aviation maintenance. Students develop 
practical skills in airframe and powerplant. Academic courses 
— in English and mathematics as well as in aviation — help 
students to understand the theoretical aspects of aviation 
maintenance. 

As graduates students will be qualified to take the examination 
for the Airframe and Powerplant, F.A.A. (Federal Aviation 
Administration) Certificate. (See page 5 for special admission 
requirements for this program.) 

Types of Jobs: Immediate employment as maintenance technicians 
for airlines or fixed base operators. After several years of experience, 
graduates with this educational background may advance to positions 
as shop supervisors, aircraft salespersons, manufacturer service 
representatives, or engineering assistants in research and development. 

Recommended High School Subjects: Three years of English and 
two years of high school algebra. A student cannot enter this program 
with any reading or math deficiencies because of the technical aspects 
of the program. 



FIRST SEMESTER 




Credits 


APC 513 


Basic Electricity 




3 


APC 514 


Federal Air Regulations 




2 


APC 515 


Material and Processes 




3 


APC 516 


Aircraft Servicing/ Fluid Liners and 


Fittings 


3 


APC 517 


Weight and Balance/ Physics 




2 


APC 518 


Turbine Engines 




3 


MTH 515 


General Aviation Math 




_3 
19 

Credits 


SECOND SEMESTER 




APC 522 


Engine Ignition Systems 




3 


APC 523 


Engine Induction and Exhaust Systems 


2 


APC 524 


Engine Fuel Systems 




3 


APC 525 


Propellers 




3 


APC 526 


Reciprocating Engines and Engine Inspection 


7 


EDT 104 


Aircraft Drawing 




20 


SUMMER 


SESSION 1 




Credits 


ENL 111 


English Composition 1 




3 


MTH 103 


College Algebra £f Trigonometry 1 




3 


PED 


Fitness & Lifetime Sports 




_1 

7 



SUMMER SESSION II 



ENL 


121 


English Composition II 


ENL 
PED 


201 


Technical Writing 
Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective* 



THIRD SEMESTER 



APC 


633 


APC 


634 


APC 


635 


APC 


636 


APC 


637 


APC 


638 



Engine Cooling and Lubricating 

Engine Fire Protection and Instruments 

Engine Electrical 

Aircraft Electrical 

Aircraft Covering, Finishes and Welding 

Aircraft Assembly and Rigging/ Inspection 



Credits 



1 
3/4 
7/8 

Credits 
4 
2 
3 
4 
3 
J3 
19 



® 



FOURTH SEMESTER 



APC 642 Aircraft Sheet Metal and Wood Structures 
APC 643 Aircraft Landing Gear, Hydraulics, Pneumatics, 

and Position/Warning 
APC 644 Aircraft Communications/ Navigation and Instruments 
APC 645 Aircraft Atmosphere Control and Ice/ Rain Control 
APC 646 Aircraft Fuel and Fire Protection 



Credits 
6 



6 

2 

3 

_2 

19 



*MGT 110 Principles of Business or 
PHS 100 Physics Mechanics are suggested. 

All deficiencies (as identified in the College's placement exams) must 
be made up prior to enrolling in the Aviation programs. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The major objectives of the Aviation degree program are: (1) 
to prepare students to pass the written, oral and practical 
Federal Aviation Administration (F.A.A.) Examination for the 
Airframe and Powerplant Maintenance Certificate; (2) to train 
students in the skills needed for jobs in aircraft maintenance; 
(3) to provide knowledge needed for supervisory and technical 
jobs. 

A graduate of the Aviation Technology degree program should 
be able to: 

1. prepare F.A.A. maintenance forms accurately. 

2. locate specific information in various aviation publications 
and be able to interpret and apply the information. 

3. read and understand aircraft and powerplant service 
publications. 

4. recognize the need for accuracy and thoroughness — as 
defined by the F.A.A. — in work. 

5. demonstrate standard inspection procedures and 
maintenance and repair skills following F.A.A. guidelines. 

6. demonstrate and practice safety habits at all times. 

7. demonstrate correct use of basic hand tools, special tools, 
and required testing equipment. 

8. use mathematics, blueprints, diagrams, and theory in 
aviation maintenance work. 

9. list, define, and correctly use aviation maintenance 
terminology. 

10. maintain high professional standards — as established by 
the F.A.A., the aviation industry, and through program 
instruction — in aviation maintenance and in dealing with 
the public. 

11. demonstrate clear, concise writing ability in composing 
letters, shop orders, and technical reports. 

12. evaluate consumer needs and relate them to current 
business procedures in aviation maintenance. 

13. use current decision-making techniques and demonstrate 
the potential for managerial growth. 

14. identify the need for physical fitness and positive leisure 
activities. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



BROADCASTING (BR) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program prepares students for entry-level jobs in 
broadcasting, for work in related fields such as public 
relations. Practical courses in broadcasting and mass 
communications are combined with courses in the liberal arts 
to provide a well- rounded program. Courses include 
announcing, broadcast writing, radio station operation and 
management, law and ethics, public relations and media 
management. The program also provides essential related 
coursework in English, government, the social sciences, 
business, and math or science. 

Types of Jobs: Radio or television announcer, disc jockey, news 
commentator, public relations assistant, advertising copywriter. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

MCM 111 Introduction to Mass Communications 

BRC 114 Audio in Media 

JOU 1 1 1 Newswriting 

SEC 509 Typewriting 

or passing score on typing exam 

ENL 111 English Composition I 

ENL 202 Fundamentals of Speech 

SECOND SEMESTER 

BRC 126 Introduction to Radio Station Operation 

BRC 233 Announcing Techniques 

MCM 122 Media and the Law 

GOV 241 State and Local Government 

PSY 111 General Psychology 

or 
SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology 

or 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
1 

3 
J 

16 

Credits 
2 
3 
3 
3 



MGT 235 


Business Psychology 




ENL 121 


English Composition II 


3 


THIRD SEMESTER 


17 
Credits 


BRC 223 


Broadcast Writing 


3 


BRC 236 


Radio Station Operation and Management 


2 


ECO 201 


Principles of Economics - '" 






or 


3 


MGT 110 


Principles of Business 




GOV 231 


American Government-National 


3 


PED 


Fitness & Lifetime Sports 


1 




Elective - Math or Science* 


3 


FOURTH SEMESTER 


15 
Credits 


BRC 240 


Station Management Practicum"* 






or 


3 


MGT 247 


Small Business Management 




MCM 242 


Media Management & Community Responsibility 


3 


MCM 243 


Public Relations 


3 


ADV 101 


Advertising 


3 


PED 


Fitness & Lifetime Sports 


1 




Elective** * 


3 



16 
*100 or 200-level course in biology, chemistry, environmental 
science, geography, geology, mathematics or physics. 
"Cooperative Education experience approved by the Division Director 
may be substituted. 



•"Elective may be any 100 or 200-level course. 
Suggested Electives: 
-ENL 201 

-PSY 111, SOC 111, MGT 235, ECO 201, MGT 110, BRC 242, or 
MGT 247 if not used to meet specific requirements in the first and 
second semesters. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Broadcasting program is to 
prepare students for positions in small to medium-size 
operations in radio broadcasting and related mass 
communication industries. Students are also prepared for 
transfer to baccalaureate degree programs. 

Graduates of the Broadcasting program will be able to: 

1. evaluate their role as individual citizens in a community as 
well as their unique importance as trained mass media 
persons with the potential to influence the lives of others in 
the community. 

2. analyze the responsibilities of the mass media in the United 
States. 

3. state ethical canons and governmental regulations or laws 
which govern the production of mass media; correlate 
personal responsibility and those laws and canons. 

4. distinguish the philosophical and practical standards and 
goals of various forms of mass media. 

5. explain examples of the impact of mass media upon the 
history of the United States and upon society. 

6. interview, research, and otherwise gather information 
needed to write and produce specialized material — 
including news, features, reviews, interviews, commercial 
announcements, public service announcements, and public 
relations news releases and sound clips — for dissemination 
through electronic or print media. 

7. demonstrate proficiency in selecting and announcing music 
from recorded material and arrange musical selections in a 
logical program form using several types of recorded 
musical styles. 

8. demonstrate proficiency in the use of the tools of audio 
production, including control room boards, mixing boards, 
microphones, tape machines, turntables, telephone 
coupling equipment, editing equipment, and various types 
of tapes. 

9. demonstrate effective performance in various types of 
announcing for mass media, including news, interviews, 
features, sports, talk shows, commercial announcements 
and public service announcements. 

10. demonstrate mass media-related employee and 
management skills which reflect effective basic business 
principles. 

1 1 . demonstrate the ability to acquire and process 
demographic information on a small to medium-sized 
market, and design a mass media plan to serve the 
particular needs of that market. 

12. evaluate the nature of advertising in the United States as it 
relates to the national economy and create usable 
advertising for the mass media. 

13. interview community leaders on local community needs 
and prepare a community needs assessment study as 
outlined by FCC regulations. 

14. demonstrate proficiency in job seeking, including the 
preparation of effective letters of application, resumes and 
audition tapes. 

15. apply skills in writing, market analysis, communications, 
and in developing specified outcome plans to related fields 
such as public relations. 



® 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 
TECHNOLOGY (CB) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program covers the theoretical and practical aspects of 
light building construction. Students learn the principles and 
techniques of light-frame carpentry and masonry. The program 
emphasizes design, construction, cost estimation, and 
management. 

Types of Jobs: Positions leading to supervisor, contractor, 
construction technician, or construction superintendent. (In addition to 
the associate degree, these jobs require suitable job experience.) 
Recommended High School Subjects: Two years of algebra, one 
year of science. One year of geometry is desirable. 



Credits 
2 
5 
2 
3 
3 

16 

Credits 
2 
5 
3 
3 
3 
J 

17 

Credits 
2 
5 
3 
3 
_4 

17 



FIRST SEMESTER 


BCT 


110 


Site Preparation and Layout 


BCT 


114 


Wood Construction I 


BCT 


115 


Construction Materials 


ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


MTH 


103 


College Algebra & Trigonometry I 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 



BCT 

BCT 

ARC 

ENL 

MTH 

PED 



120 
125 
102 
201 
104 



Blueprints, Specifications and Codes 

Wood Construction II 

Basic Architectural Drafting 

Technical Writing 

College Algebra & Trigonometry II 

Fitness Et Lifetime Sports 



THIRD SEMESTER 



BCT 
BCT 
BCT 
ECO 
PHS 



230 
233 
238 
201 
100 



Commercial Construction I 
Masonry Construction I 
Concrete Construction 
Principles of Economics 
Physics-Mechanics 




FOURTH SEMESTER 

BCT 240 Commercial Construction II 

BCT 244 Construction Estimating and Management 

BCT 245 Practical Construction Experience 

BCT 246 Masonry Construction II 

CSC 102 Introduction to Microcomputers 



Credits 
2 
2 
3 
5 
J 

15 



Co-op Options: 

Alternating 

Parallel 

Summer 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objectives of this program are to prepare 
graduates for employment in the residential and commercial 
construction industry. 

A graduate of the Building Construction Technology program 
should be able to: 

1. write clear, concise, legible, and accurate technical reports 
and use verbal communication skills in job-related activities. 

2. demonstrate the basic manipulative skills needed to lay out 
and plan work. 

3. interpret and prepare plans, drawings, specifications, lines, 
symbols, and abbreviations on working drawings or 
blueprints. 

4. demonstrate the ability to lay out and erect residential and 
commercial structures. 

5. analyze specifications and contract drawings; make 
accurate quantity take-offs and labor estimations to 
develop an estimated construction cost for a building 
project. 

6. demonstrate basic knowledge and skills in masonry and 
concrete construction. 

7. describe various types of materials and methods used in 
the construction trade. 

8. describe the organization, financing, labor relations, selling, 
pricing, customer service, management, and other aspects 
of business. 

9. describe the complexity of the building construction 
industry, the relationships among the various trades; 
methods of communication and coordination among all 
trades and professions in the industry. 

10. solve building construction problems using algebra and 
trigonometry. 

11. apply scientific procedures learned in physics to 
construction problems. 

12. apply technical and basic skills on practical residential and 
commercial construction projects. 

13. demonstrate knowledge of a lifetime sport which will 
provide recreation and promote physical fitness. 



30 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



FIRST SEMESTER 


MGT 110 


Principles of Business* 


MGT 111 


Business Mathematics 


ACC 112 


Accounting 1* 


SEC 111 


Typewriting 1 


ENL 111 


English Composition 1 


PED 


Fitness Er Lifetime Sports 



BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (BM) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program provides basic business knowledge. It covers 
management theory and application, business concepts, and 
the effect of business on the economy. 

Types of Jobs: Junior-executive or management trainee positions in 
manufacturing, retailing, finance, banking, insurance, marketing, and 
government. 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_^ 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
J 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 

15 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 

15 



SECOND SEMESTER 



MGT 


230 


-Business Communications 


ACC 


122 


-Accounting II 


CSC 


118 


Fundamentals of Computer Science* 


ECO 


201 


Principles of Economics* 


PED 




Fitness Et Lifetime Sports 
Elective-Social Science/ Humanities 


THIRD SEMESTER 


MGT 


231 


Business Law I* v 


ACC 


230 


Managerial Accounting^ 


ENL 


202 


Fundamentals of Speech 



• Elective-Computer Science*)^ 
Elective* 



FOURTH SEMESTER 



MGT 125 

MGT 241 

MGT 248 

MKT 240 



Finance* •' 
" Business Law II "*■ 
Supervision and Human Relations 
Marketing "X 
Elective* 



"Equivalent AIB (American Institute of Banking) courses may be 
substituted with Division approval. 

Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 

EVENING PROGRAM 

Courses required for the associate degree in Business 
Management are also offered in the evenings and on 
weekends for the convenience of students who are unable to 
attend weekday classes. Students may complete all courses 
required for a degree in Business Management by enrolling in 
evening and weekend courses on a part-time basis. Part-time 
students may require more than two years to complete the 
program. 




PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of this program is to prepare the student 
for employment in business management. The program will 
also upgrade the skills of those now employed in this field. 

The graduate should be able to: 

1. demonstrate specialized knowledge and skills needed for 
employment in business management. 

2. demonstrate potential for managerial growth and the ability 
to use the tools of modern decision making. 

3. demonstrate knowledge of profit motives. 

4. apply generally accepted accounting principles. 

5. identify, compare, and use financial statements and 
management information systems. 

6. evaluate consumer needs, and relate them to current 
business procedures. 

7. relate in a positive manner to supervisors, peers, and 
subordinates. 

8. apply knowledge of computer technology systems in 
making managerial decisions. 

9. demonstrate skills in effective verbal and written 
communication. 

10. identify the laws affecting business. 

1 1 . identify the need for physical fitness and positive leisure 
activities. 



® 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (CT) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program trains students in the skills needed to assist civil 
engineers in planning, designing and building highways, 
railroads, bridges, airfields, buildings, and dams. Experience 
with modern equipment prepares students to meet the 
challenge of recent technical developments. 

Types of Jobs: Engineering technician, surveyor, inspector, 
draftsperson, cartographer, design technician, photogrammetrist, 
construction manager. 

Recommended High School Subjects: Two years of algebra, one 
year of science. 



Credits 
2 
3 
2 
3 

3/4 

1 
3 



FIRST SEMESTER 


CET 


111 


Materials of Construction 


CET 


112 


Engineering Drawing 


CET 


113 


Introductory Surveying 


ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


MTH 


103 


College Algebra & Trigonometry I 


MTH 


238 


Calculus I 


PED 




Fitness £t Lifetime Sports 
Elective-Humanities/ Social Science 



SECOND SEMESTER 



CET 


121 


Plane Surveying 


CET 


122 


Topographic Drawing & Cartography 


CET 


244 


Photogrammetry 


ENL 


121 


English Composition II 


ENL 


201 


Technical Writing 


MTH 


104 


College Algebra & Trigonometry II 


MTH 


248 


Calculus II 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 


THIRD SEMESTER 


CET 


231 


Route Surveying 


CET 


232 


Origin, Distribution & Behavior of Soils 


CET 


233 


Statics 


CET 


234 


Highway Engineering Technology 


PHS 


115 


College Physics I 


PSH 


116 


General Physics I 



17/18 

Credits 
4 
3 
3 



3/4 

1^ 

17/18 

Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 



17 



FOURTH SEMESTER 









Credits 


CET 


245 


Advanced Surveying 








or 


2 






Approved Co-op 




CET 


242 


Fluid Mechanics 


3 


CET 


243 


Strength of Materials 


3 


CSC 


103 


Introduction to Computers with FORTRAN 


3 


PHS 


125 


College Physics II 








or 


4 


PHS 


126 


General Physics II 




MTH 


201 


Elementary Statistics 1 








or 


3 


MTH 


107 


Applied Calculus* 





18 



•Students who have completed MTH 238 and MTH 248 may not 
schedule MTH 107. 

Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Civil Engineering Technology 
program is to prepare students for technical-level positions in 
the field of civil engineering. The program also provides an 
overview of the field and prepares students for advanced 
study. 

A graduate of the Civil Engineering Technology program 
should be able to: 

1. distinguish between various types of surveys and select and 
use the proper instruments and methods for each type of 
survey. These will include boundary, control, construction, 
topographic and geodetic surveys. 

2. construct a cartographic and topographic map using 
recognized mapping procedures. 

3. use aerial photographs in making engineering 
measurements and topographic maps. 

4. apply basic criteria used to design and locate highways and 
estimate earthwork quantities for highway construction. 

5. determine and use the engineering properties of the basic 
construction materials such as steel, concrete, wood, and 
soil. 

6. understand the functions of basic structural components 
and be able to design these components to resist applied 
loads. 

7. demonstrate a working knowledge of the mechanics of 
compressible and incompressible fluid flow and their 
applications in piping systems, pumps, open channels, and 
reservoirs. 

8. communicate effectively through the skills learned in 
English Composition and Engineering Drawing. 

9. use social science concepts for a better understanding of 
himself or herself and to relate more effectively to others. 

10. use algebra and trigonometry to solve problems related to 
civil engineering. 

11. apply scientific procedures learned in physics in solving 
engineering problems. 

12. recognize the need for physical fitness and lifelong 
recreational activities through physical education. 

13. prepare the computer programs needed to solve 
engineering problems. 

14. demonstrate fundamental skills and knowledge in the use 
of computer aided drafting (CAD) and perform basic 
drawing functions on computer aided equipment. 



32 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



CLERICAL STUDIES (BT) 

Certificate/ 1 year 

(Starts in January of each year) 



Clerical Studies emphasizes basic office skills. You will learn 
the fundamentals of typing, microcomputer operation, 
business machine calculation, and office procedures— filing, 
processing mail, reception work, and office communications. 
The program also gives students the chance to develop skills 
in word processing, machine transcription, microtranscription, 
and payroll procedures. 



Types of Jobs: Clerk-typist, receptionist, word processor, 
general clerical, payroll work, machine transcription. 



filing. 



FIRST SEMESTER 


SEC 111 


Typewriting I 


CLS 718 


Clerical Office Procedures 


CSC 104 


Microcomputer Fundamentals 


MGT 230 


Business Communications 


ENL 111 


English Composition I 



SECOND SEMESTER 



CLS 


726 


Microtranscription 


CLS 


729 


Clerical Office Workshon 


SEC 


121 


Typewriting II 


MGT 


111 


Business Mathematics 


WDP 


121 


Word Processing I 



Credits 
3 
5 
1 
3 
J 

15 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
J 

15 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Clerical Studies program is to 
prepare students for employment in entry-level office positions. 

The graduate should be able to: 

1 . demonstrate skills in performing routine office tasks. 

2. write and speak clearly and effectively. 

3. perform basic clerical office procedures. 

4. demonstrate basic knowledge of modern office equipment 
and office supplies. 

5. apply working knowledge of microcomputers. 

6. apply working knowledge of duplicating and other copying 
methods, word processing, and computational skills. 

7. assess and influence behavior among supervisors, peers, 
and subordinates. 

8. apply general knowledge of the social sciences, and 
understand their effect on our society. 



COMPUTER OPERATOR (CO) 
Certificate/1 year 



This program trains students in all aspects of data processing 
operations and the effective use of the equipment. The 
student is prepared for entry-level jobs in industry as a 
qualified computer operator. This program provides an option 
for those students who are interested in data processing 
careers, but who do not want to be programmers. 

Types of Jobs: Computer operator, peripheral data processing 
equipment operator, operations manager, data and job control 
managers and technical sales representatives. 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
1 
J 

16 

Credits 
4 
2 
3 
3 
3/4 

15/16 



FIRST SEMESTER 


COP 713 


Computer Operations I 


CSC 118 


Fundamentals of Computer Science 


ACC 112 


Accounting I 


SEC 509 


Typewriting 


ENL 111 


English Composition I 



SECOND SEMESTER 



COP 723 

COP 724 

CSC 120 

ENL 201 



Computer Operations II 
Computer Operations Internship 
Business Computer Applications 
Technical Writing 
Elective - Computer Science 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Computer Operator program is to 
prepare the student for jobs in computer operations in such 
positions as computer operator, peripheral equipment operator, 
data entry clerk, or data controller. 

The graduate should be able to: 

1. operate computer systems. 

2. demonstrate skills in technical writing. 

3. relate in a positive manner to supervisors, peers, and 
subordinates. 

4. use system utility programs. 

5. interpret and manage data controls from data entry to 
completed output. 

6. interpret and use written documentation for program 
execution. 

7. apply job control language to perform computer jobs. 

8. operate peripheral and other data processing equipment. 

9. maintain operation logs and libraries. 

10. perform routine housekeeping tasks in the computer area 
and general maintenance on the equipment. 

11. apply generally accepted accounting principles. 



® 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CS) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



Computer Information Systems offers students the background 
and skills needed to enter this fast-growing field. The program 
offers a strong background in commonly used programming 
languages, including PASCAL and COBOL. Students may also 
elect other languages — RPG, BASIC, Advanced Assembler 
and FORTRAN. The program includes a major emphasis in 
systems analysis, file processing, data structures and data base 
processing. 

Types of Jobs: Entry-level application programming. With experience 

graduates could advance to positions in systems analysis, systems 

design, programming and systems project leadership and management, 

data processing and information systems management, and general 

management. 

Recommended High School Subjects: Two units of math, including 

algebra. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

ACC 112 Accounting I 

CSC 112 Programming In PASCAL 

CSC 118 Fundamentals of Computer Science 

ENL 111 English Composition I 

MTH 101 Introduction to Mathematics I* 

or 

MTH 103 College Algebra & Trigonometry I 

SEC 509 Typewriting 

PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 

CSC 125 Data and Information Structures 

CSC 128 COBOL Programming I 

ENL English Requirement** 

MTH 102 Introduction to Mathematics II* 

or 
MTH 104 College Algebra & Trigonometry II 
PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 

Elective - Math/ Science/ Business 



THIRD SEMESTER 

CSC 230 Computer Systems with Assembler 
CSC 235 Systems Analysis and Design Methods 
CSC 238 COBOL Programming II 

Elective - Computer Science*** 
Elective - Math/ Science/ Business 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

CSC 240 File and Database Processing 
CSC 248 Applied Software Development 
Elective - Computer Science*** 
Elective - Math/ Science/ Business 
Elective - Social Science/ Humanities 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 



1 
17 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 



1 

3/4 

16/17 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3/4 

15/16 



Credits 

3 

3 

3 

3/4 

3 

15/16 



•Must complete MTH 101 - 102 or MTH 103 



•Either ENL 121 - English Composition II, ENL 201 
Writing, or ENL 202 - Fundamentals of Speech. 



104 sequence. 
Technical 



"'Computer Science Electives: 
CSC 231 Programming in RPG 
CSC 232 Programming in BASIC 
CSC 239 FORTRAN with Plotting 
CSC 244 Advanced Assembly Language 

EVENING PROGRAM 

Courses required for the associate degree in Computer 
Information Systems are also offered in the evenings and on 
weekends for the convenience of students who are unable to 
attend weekday classes. Students may complete all courses 
required for a degree in Computer Information Systems by 
enrolling in evening and weekend courses on a part-time basis. 
Part-time students may require more than two years to 
complete the program. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of Computer Information Systems is to 
prepare students for jobs as computer programmers or junior 
systems analysts. As an alternative, graduates may pursue 
advanced degrees. The program will also upgrade the skills of 
those employed in the field. 

The graduate should be able to: 

1. write effective, efficient computer programs in PASCAL, 
COBOL, BASIC and Assembler languages. 

2. demonstrate ability to reason logically, to analyze, to 
synthesize, and to evaluate technical information and to 
apply these processes. 

3. demonstrate skills in verbal and written communications. 

4. relate in a positive manner to supervisors, peers, and 
subordinates. 

5. use structured programming techniques. 

6. prepare written documentation of computer programs. 

7. assist in the design of business systems. 

8. use system software packages to execute computer jobs. 

9. identify the concepts and organization of various operating 
systems. 

10. design and incorporate data controls from data entry to 
completed output. 

11. use interactive programming techniques. 

12. perform basic operations on a computer system and related 
data processing equipment. 

13. apply generally accepted accounting and mathematical 
principles. 

14. apply general knowledge of the social sciences. 

15. identify the need for physical fitness and positive leisure 
activities. 



34 






ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



CONSTRUCTION CARPENTRY (CO 

Certificate/2 years 



This program provides training in carpentry and masonry skills. 
Students develop skills in the correct use of hand tools, 
portable power tools and portable power equipment — they 
also become licensed in the use of power activated tools. The 
program includes classroom instruction in construction 
methods, procedures and materials. Students gain experience 
through working on on and off-campus construction projects 
under the supervision of qualified instructors. Prior to 
beginning the third semester students will select either the 
carpentry or home remodeling option for specialization in 
advanced courses. 

Types of Jobs: Apprentice carpenters or masons, with advancement 
possibilities; employment in plants or factories where building units, 
components, or building materials are made or sold. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

BCT 110 Site Preparation and Layout 

BCT 114 Wood Construction I 

BCT 233 Masonry Construction I 

MTH 710 Technical Mathematics I 



SECOND SEMESTER 



BCT 


120 


Blueprints, Specifications and Codes 


BCT 


125 


Wood Construction II 


BCT 


246 


Masonry Construction II 


ARC 


102 


Basic Architectural Drafting 


ENL 


711 


Communications 



CARPENTRY OPTION 

THIRD SEMESTER 

BCT 230 Commercial Construction I 
BCT 235 Wood Construction III 
BCT 236 Interior Finish Materials 
BCT 238 Concrete Construction 
Elective 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

BCT 240 Commercial Construction II 
BCT 244 Construction Estimating 6- Management 
BCT 245 Practical Construction Experience 
BCT 247 Wood Construction IV 
Elective 



HOME REMODELING OPTION 

THIRD SEMESTER 

BCT 235 Wood Construction III 
BCT 236 Interior Finish Materials 
BCT 237 Home Remodeling I 
PLH 254 Plumbing for the Trades 
Elective 



Credits 

2 

5 

5 

_3 

15 

Credits 
2 
5 
5 
3 
_3 

18 



Credits 
2 
5 
4 
3 
_3 

17 

Credits 
2 
2 
3 
5 
J 

15 



Credits 
5 
4 
2 
2 
J 

16 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

BCT 244 Construction Estimating h Management 

BCT 245 Practical Construction Experience 

BCT 247 Wood Construction IV 

BCT 248 Home Remodeling II 

ELT 110 Electricity for the Trades 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 



Credits 
2 
3 
5 
4 
_3 
17 



The major emphasis of this program is to provide basic skills 
and knowledge in the building construction industry. 

A graduate of the Construction Carpentry program should be 
able to: 

1 . demonstrate basic knowledge and skills in the use of the 
builder's level-transit and other measuring devices for site 
preparation and building layout. 

2. demonstrate basic knowledge and skills in masonry and 
concrete construction. 

3. demonstrate basic knowledge and skills in the layout and 
construction of residential and commercial structures. 

4. demonstrate basic knowledge and skills in the installation 
of exterior siding, roofing, trim and millwork, and building 
insulation. 

5. demonstrate basic knowledge and skills in the installation 
of interior finish, floors, walls and ceilings. 

6. demonstrate basic knowledge and skills in the installation 
of doors and interior trim; build and/or install cabinet work 
and finish stairways. 

7. demonstrate basic knowledge of the trades related to the 
building industry — for example, ceramic tile and resilient 
floor installations. 

8. look for, secure, and keep a job; understand the factors 
involved in self-employment and the importance of 
customer service; develop and work toward personal goals. 

9. read and interpret blueprints and specifications. 

10. demonstrate and apply construction estimating and project 
management skills. 

11. apply carpentry and masonry skills to home remodeling 
projects. 

12. use the basic skills of verbal and written communication 
needed to understand instructions and present ideas and 
instructions in a clear and logical manner. 

13. use the basic math skills required on the job and needed to 
develop visualization skills and logical thought processes. 

14. practice safe work habits, demonstrate responsible 
attitudes, and produce high quality work. 



® 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



DAIRY HERD MANAGEMENT |DY) 
Certificate/1 year 



The Dairy Herd Management program provides training in the 
skills needed to successfully manage and operate a dairy farm. 
The program covers all aspects of dairy farm management — 
from soil preparation and feed crop production to milk 
processing. Dairy farm management — accounting and 
decision making — are included. Whether students plan to 
return to their family farms or to work as herd managers for 
large dairy operations, this program offers them the necessary 
skills. 

Types of Jobs: Dairy farm manager, dairy herds manager, farm 
manager (general), Dairy Herd Improvement Association field 
technician. 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
J 
15 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
J 
18 



FIRST SEMESTER 


DHM 711 


Soils & Soil Fertility 


DHM 712 


Forage Production 


DHM 713 


Dairy Feeding and Management 


DHM 714 


Dairy Herd Health 


MTH 710 


Technical Mathematics I 



SECOND SEMESTER 



DHM 


721 


DHM 


722 


DHM 


723 


DHM 


724 


DHM 


725 


ENL 


711 



Financing Dairy Enterprises 
Milking Management 
Farm Records and Analysis 
Animal Breeding and Reproduction 
Replacement Stock Management 
Communications 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 



The objective of this program is to train students in the skills 
needed to successfully manage and operate a dairy farm. The 
program emphasizes the practical aspects of dairy farm 
operation. 

A graduate of Dairy Herd Management should be able to: 

1. analyze and work with soils — check soil conditions, select 
and apply the correct fertilizer, cultivate soil, calculate 
fertilizer formulas — and plan crops for dairy forage 
production. 

2. understand financial institutions and programs as they 
relate to agriculture and apply the necessary financial 
principles. 

3. develop dairy herd feeding programs which meet nutritional 
requirements for milk production, herd reproduction, 
maintenance and growth — based on knowledge of forage 
analysis, feed handling, and feed storage facilities. 




4. apply health standards and sanitary milking procedures — 
with an emphasis on preventing herd health problems — 
and maintain milking equipment and facilities. 

5. design a breeding and reproduction program using 
knowledge of sire selection, physiology related to 
reproduction and artificial insemination. 

6. demonstrate skills in keeping farm accounts and interpret 
records related to the economic aspects of dairy 
production. 

7. identify health problems of the herd which require 
treatment or diagnosis in order to maintain a healthy, 
productive herd. 

8. demonstrate knowledge of the management techniques 
needed for success in the dairy industry. 

9. demonstrate a strong work ethic. 



36 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



DENTAL HYGIENE (DH) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



FIRST SEMESTER 


DHG 


100 


Introduction to Dental Hygiene 


DHG 


115 


Oral Anatomy & Histology 


BIO 


115 


Human Anatomy & Physiology I 


CHM 


100 


Fundamentals of Chemistry 


FHD 


112 


Nutrition 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



This program offers the theoretical and clinical training needed 
for a variety of dental hygiene careers. The program provides a 
diversified background — to prepare students for licensing 
exams, for additional education, for jobs. Students must earn 
a minimum grade of "C" in each aspect of their dental 
hygiene courses. Failure to do so will result in termination from 
the program. See page 5 for special admission requirements 
for this program. 

Types of Jobs: Hygienists are employed by dentists in private dental 
practices, research, government health agencies, school systems, 
hospital and industrial clinics, military services and in dental hygiene 
education programs. 

Required High School Courses: Because of the strong emphasis on 
science in the dental hygiene program, applicants must have 
successfully completed one year of high school biology and two years 
of high school algebra. It is also recommended that the applicant have 
an additional laboratory science (i.e., physics, chemistry). 



Credits 
4 
3 
4 
4 
3 
_^ 

19 



Credits 
2 
1 
4 
3 
4 
_4 

18 

Credits 
5 
1 
2 
3 
2 
_3 

16 

Credits 
2 
4 
2 
3 
3 
1 
J 

18 



SECOND SEMESTER 



DHG 

DHG 

DHG 

DHG 

BIO 

BIO 



121 
123 
124 
126 
125 
201 



Dental Materials 

Periodontics I 

Clinical Dental Hygiene I 

Dental Radiology 

Human Anatomy & Physiology II 

Microbiology 



THIRD SEMESTER 



DHG 
DHG 
DHG 
DHG 
DHG 
ENL 



230 
236 
239 
243 
245 
111 



Clinical Dental Hygiene II 

Periodontics II 

General & Oral Pathology 

Dental Specialties 

Pharmacology 

English Composition I 



FOURTH SEMESTER 



DHG 


241 


DHG 


242 


DHG 


244 


ENL 


202 


PSY 


111 


PED 





Community Dental Health 
Clinical Dental Hygiene III 
Dental Practice Orientation 
Fundamentals of Speech 
General Psychology 
Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-Social Science 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Dental Hygiene program is to 
prepare students to successfully pass the National Dental 
Hygiene Board examinations, the Northeast Regional Boards, 
the required examinations for selected states, and to qualify 
for employment as dental hygienists. 

The Dental Hygiene graduate should be able to: 

1. apply knowledge of the design, uses, and sharpening 
methods of dental hygiene instruments. 

2. identify anatomical landmarks of the head and neck and 
identify deviations from normal. 

3. use correct anatomical terminology in classifying all 
permanent and primary teeth on the basis of morphological 
and histological characteristics and occlusion. 

4. apply knowledge of microbiology in aseptic techniques 
while performing a complete and thorough prophylaxis. 

5. demonstrate appropriate preventive oral health procedures. 

6. develop, process, and evaluate all types of intra and extra 
oral radiographs. 

7. apply knowledge of interpersonal and motivational skills 
and communication techniques learned in English, speech, 
psychology, and social sciences when working with 
patients, other members of the dental health team, and 
community groups. 

8. operate all dental equipment safely, effectively, and 
efficiently. 

9. demonstrate a commitment to professional organizations 
through attending meetings, seminars, and continuing 
education programs. 

10. apply knowledge of dental hygiene skills in a variety of 
settings (e.g., private practice, specialty practice, public 
institutions, industry, public health, etc.). 

11. administer first aid and emergency treatment. 

12. explain properties, dosage, actions, and reactions of drugs 
used in dentistry. 

13. apply the concepts of anatomy, physiology, and nutrition in 
relating dental health to total health. 

14. record all vital signs accurately and maintain accurate 
health histories, patient records and forms; conform to 
legal guidelines related to these materials. 

15. develop sound ethical, philosophical, and moral 
professional characteristics. 

16. apply concepts of chemistry in analyzing dental materials 
and relate them to body processes. 

17. demonstrate knowledge of a lifetime sport which will 
provide recreation and promote physical fitness. 



® 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



DIESEL MECHANICS (DM) 
Certificate/2 years 



This program covers the theories and practical skills of diesel 
mechanics. Students develop the skills needed to work with 
diesel-powered highway vehicles, industrial and marine engines 
and commercial powerplants. Some specialization — in fuel 
injection service, engine repair and rebuilding, power train, 
brakes, steering, and chassis work — is available. Students may 
start this program in the fall, spring or summer semester. 
Students are required to enroll for at least one summer 
semester. 

Types of Jobs: Heavy duty truck mechanic tor truck dealership, 
independent garage, truck fleet, or contractor. Industrial engine 
mechanic in mining, quarrying, construction equipment, or marine 
waterways fleet. Field service representative for diesel engine 
manufacturer or distributor. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

DMC 513 Introduction to Diesel Mechanics (8 weeks) 
DMC 514 Internal Combustion Engines (8 weeks) 
MTH 710 Technical Mathematics I 



SECOND SEMESTER 

DMC 523 Four-Cycle Diesel Engines (8 weeks) 
DMC 524 Two-Cycle Diesel Engines (8 weeks) 
ENL 711 Communications 



THIRD SEMESTER 

DMC 533 Fuel Injection Systems I (8 weeks) 
DMC 534 Fuel Injection Systems II (8 weeks) 
Optional Elective 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

DMC 543 Truck Tractor Power Train (8 weeks) 
DMC 544 Truck Tractor Chassis (8 weeks) 
Optional Elective 



Credits 

7 

7 

_3 

17 

Credits 

7 

7 

J 

17 

Credits 

7 

7 

0/3 

14/17 

Credits 

7 

7 

0/3 

14/17 



Co-op Options: 

Alternating 

Parallel 

Summer 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The goal of this program is to prepare students for diesel 
mechanic careers in transportation, construction, marine, and 
related fields. The program also prepares students to take the 
Pennsylvania Vehicle Safety Inspection exam required for 
certification as a vehicle safety inspection mechanic. 

A graduate of Diesel Mechanics should be able to: 

1 . diagnose and repair common malfunctions of systems and 
components on popular makes of diesel engines. 



38^ 




2. demonstrate correct service of: 

a. diesel engines 

b. truck transmission and drive trains 

c. fuel systems, and other engine accessories 

3. perform state inspections. 

4. diagnose equipment failure, isolate faulty systems or 
components, and make necessary repairs. 

5. interpret wiring diagrams, test and make repairs to starting, 
charging, lighting, and accessory systems on vehicles. 

6. use basic math operations (addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, division) including decimals, fractions, and 
conversions in diesel mechanics work. 

7. write clear, concise, and accurate abstracts and reports. 

8. demonstrate safe work habits and describe their 
importance to the diesel industry and OSHA. 

9. demonstrate a responsible attitude toward diesel service, 
the diesel manufacturing industry and the world of work. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



DIESEL TECHNOLOGY (DD) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program covers both theory and practical skills in diesel 
mechanics. Hands-on work in diesel is a major component of 
the program. Classroom work provides a strong background in 
the theoretical aspects of diesel mechanics and prepares 
students to take the National Institute of Automotive Service 
Excellence Examinations (NIASE) and the Pennsylvania Vehicle 
Safety Inspection Certification Examination. The program 
prepares students for work in diesel mechanics and for 
additional education at the baccalaureate level. 

Types of Jobs: Immediate employment as maintenance technicians in 
the trucking industry. With several years of experience graduates may 
advance to such positions as shop supervisor, truck salesperson, 
manufacturer service representative or engineering assistant in research 
and development. 

Recommended High School Subjects: Three years of English and 
two years of algebra. A student cannot enter this program with any 
reading or math deficiencies. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

DMC 513 Introduction to Diesel Mechanics (8 weeks) 

DMC 514 Internal Combustion Engines (8 weeks) 

MTH 103 College Algebra & Trigonometry I 

PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 

DMC 523 Four-Cycle Diesel Engines (8 weeks) 
DMC 524 Two-Cycle Diesel Engines (8 weeks) 
MTH Elective* 



SUMMER SESSION 

ENL 111 English Composition I 
PHS 100 Physics-Mechanics 

Elective** 



THIRD SEMESTER 

DMC 533 Fuel Injection Systems I (8 weeks) 
DMC 534 Fuel Injection Systems II (8 weeks) 
ENL 201 Technical Writing 



FOURTH SEMESER 

DMC 543 Truck Tractor Powertrain (8 weeks) 

DMC 544 Truck Tractor Chassis (8 weeks) 

EDT 101 Mechanical Drawing 

PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



*MTH 104 College Algebra & Trigonometry II, or 
MTH 201 Elementary Statistics I 

"Mathematics, Science, or Business Management 



Credits 
7 
7 
3 

18 

Credits 

7 

7 

_3 

17 

Credits 

3 

4 

J 

10 

Credits 

7 

7 

J 

17 

Credits 

7 

7 

2 

J[ 

17 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The major objectives of the Diesel Technology program are: 1) 
to prepare students for such careers as maintenance 
technician, shop foreperson, service writer, service 
representative for a manufacturer or distributor; 2) to provide 
the background needed for additional education; 3) to prepare 
students to take the Pennsylvania Vehicle Safety Inspection 
Certification Examination and the National Institute of 
Automotive Service Excellence Examinations (NIASE) in heavy 
duty truck mechanics; 4) to prepare students for employment 
at the supervisory and technical level. 

A graduate of Diesel Technology should be able to: 

1. diagnose and repair common malfunctions of systems and 
components on popular makes of diesel engines. 

2. demonstrate correct service of: 

a. diesel engines 

b. truck transmissions and drive trains 

c. fuel systems and other engine accessories 

3. perform vehicle safety inspections as required by state and 
federal laws. 

4. diagnose equipment failure, isolate faulty systems or 
components and make necessary adjustments or repairs. 

5. interpret blueprints and wiring diagrams; test starting, 
charging, lighting and accessory systems; make 
adjustments and repairs to vehicles and engines; apply 
basic knowledge of air conditioning. 

6. use mathematics, blueprints, diagrams and theory in the 
diesel and trucking trade. 

7. write clear, concise and accurate abstracts and reports and 
converse intelligently with others. 

8. demonstrate and practice safety habits — as required by the 
trade and by OSHA — at all times. 

9. list, define and correctly use diesel technology terminology. 

10. demonstrate the correct use of basic hand tools, special 
tools and required testing equipment. 

1 1 . demonstrate clear, concise writing ability in composing 
letters, shop orders and technical reports. 

12. evaluate consumer needs and relate them to business 
procedures currently used in the trade. 

13. demonstrate the ability to apply modern decision making 
techniques and the potential for managerial growth. 

14. identify the need for physical fitness and positive leisure 
activities. 



® 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



DIETETIC TECHNICIAN (DT) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



The Dietetic Technician program emphasizes food production, 
patient nutritional care and dietary administration in health care 
and other institutions. Classroom work and practical 
experience stress the normal and therapeutic needs of 
humans, food production, planning and sanitation, 
management skills and accounting. This program includes 450 
hours of clinical experiences. (Students will need to plan for 
transportation to clinic sites during their second year in the 
program.) 

Types of Jobs: Directors of dietary departments for nursing homes or 
school cafeterias; middle managers in hospital dietary departments. 
Responsibilities include supervision of production and tray service to 
patients. Assist dietitians in patient contact, nutritional status and care 
data, as well as employee supervision and training. May also be 
employed in middle management in commercial quantity food 
production. 

Recommended High School Courses: One unit of high school 
biology or chemistry, and high school math. 



FIRST SEMESTER 










Credits 


FHD 


111 


Introductory Foods 


3 


FHD 


112 


Nutrition 


3 


FHD 


113 


Field Experience in 








Management Systems 1 (2nd 8 weeks) 


1 


FHD 


114 


Introduction to Food Service Administration and 








Medical Care Organization 


2 


FHD 


115 


Purchasing, Storage & Sanitation 


3 


BIO 


110 


Applied Human Physiology 


3 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 


1 



SECOND SEMESTER 

FHD 121 Quantity Food Preparation 

FHD 122 Diet Therapy with Dietetic Seminar 

FHD 123 Field Experience in Management Systems II 

FHD 125 Menu Planning and Cost Control 

ENL 111 English Composition I 

PSY Elective-Psychology 

SUMMER TERM 

FHD 250 Hospitality, Dietetic Work Experience 
(Management Systems III) 

THIRD SEMESTER 



FHD 231 

FHD 235 

FHD 245 

ACC 112 
PED 



Field Experience in Management Systems IV 

Personnel Management, Work Simplification 

Equipment and Layouts 

Accounting I 

Fitness & Lifetime Sports 

Elective* 



16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 

18 

Credits 
1 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
J 
16 



® 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

FHD 234 Health Care Delivery Systems 

FHD 242 Field Experience in Management Systems V 

FHD 246 Hospitality Merchandising 

or 
FHD 241 Beverage Management & Catering 
ENL 121 English Composition II 

or 
ENL 202 Fundamentals of Speech 
SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology 



Credits 
3 
3 



_3 

15 



'Suggested Electives: 
MTR 101 Medical Terminology I 
CSC 118 Fundamentals of Computer Science 
CHM 105 General Organic Chemistry 

Co-op: 

Summer (required) 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Dietetic Technician program is to 
prepare students for employment in medical care institutions in 
diet planning, kitchen supervision, and patient education. The 
program is designed to satisfy regulatory agency requirements 
for Dietetic Technicians. 

The Dietetic Technician graduate should be able to: 

1 . demonstrate proper techniques of food preparation and 
food handling sanitation. 

2. plan, develop and manage work schedules, job 
descriptions, menu planning, purchasing, portion control, 
and patient tray and cafeteria service. 

3. describe equipment available on the market, and plan its 
arrangement, operation, and maintenance for efficiency 
and safety. 

4. demonstrate creativity and sound thinking in personnel 
evaluations and in solving management problems. 

5. conform to professional standards in personal appearance 
and demonstrate appropriate attitudes. 

6. describe the physiological effects of food in the human 
body. 

7. demonstrate a responsible attitude toward the dietetic 
profession and the community. 

8. demonstrate ability to communicate clearly, both verbally 
and in writing, with co-workers and patients. 

9. understand financial and budgetary controls in health care 
institutions. 

10. assist in dietary record keeping. 

11. demonstrate knowledge of the responsibilities of a dietitian; 
identify areas in which he/she may be of help and areas in 
which he/she should ask for assistance. 

12. apply knowledge of physical activities and sports in 
maintaining good health. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



ELECTRICAL OCCUPATIONS (EO) 
Certificate/2 years 



This program offers the skills and theoretical background 
needed for a variety of careers. Graduates may work as 
electricians in electrical construction or in electrical 
maintenance — where they would work with electrical 
machinery. They will also be qualified to develop the circuitry 
used to install and troubleshoot electrical and electronic 
machine controlled equipment and systems. The program 
emphasizes electrical and electronic basics and the 
development of skills through laboratory practice. Courses in 
math, science and the humanities improve students' 
employment prospects. 

Types of Jobs: Industrial maintenance, electrical troubleshooter, 
power company employee, construction union apprentice, electrical 
tester or inspector; self-employment in residential and commercial 
wiring. 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
_3 

18 

Credits 
4 
6 
3 
2 
J 

18 

Credits 
3 
3 
6 
2 
2 
0/3 

16/19 

Credits 
3 
4 
4 
4 
_3 

18 



FIRST SEMESTER 


ELC 711 


Direct Current Fundamentals 


ELC 712 


Basic Wiring Lab 


ELC 715 


Motor Maintenance and Repair 


ENL 711 


Communications 


MTH 710 


Technical Mathematics I 



SECOND SEMESTER 

ELC 721 Basic Motor Control 

ELC 722 Alternating Current Fundamentals 

ELC 726 Residential Blueprints 

ELT 113 Accident Prevention 

MTH 500 Technical Mathematics II 



THIRD SEMESTER 

ELC 832 Advanced Motor Control 
ELC 833 Basic Electrical Construction Lab 
ELC 834 Basic Electronics for Industry 
ELC 835 Commercial, Industrial Blueprints and Equipment 
EDT 102 Engineering Drafting 
Optional Elective 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

ELC 845 Advanced Electrical Construction 

ELC 847 Programmable Control 

ELC 848 Electrical Machinery Analysis 

ELC 849 Industrial Control 

PHS 500 Physics Survey 



Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 




PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

This program prepares graduates for jobs in residential, 
commercial or industrial electrical construction and 
maintenance. 

A graduate of Electrical Occupations should be able to: 

1. demonstrate technical skills in a variety of electrical fields, 
apply accepted safety standards and meet work quality 
standards. 

2. demonstrate knowledge in electrical theory, mathematics 
and physics and apply this knowledge in the construction 
and operation of electrical systems. 

3. use and care for electrical tools and materials and 
demonstrate the ability to requisition these items from a 
stockroom or supplier. 

4. read and develop blueprints and use this information in 
performing installations which comply with the National 
Electrical Code. 

5. interpret ideas and develop plans through communicating 
with others. 

6. operate, maintain and repair rotating electrical machines. 

7. demonstrate working knowledge of electrical construction 
procedures in residential, commercial, and industrial 
installations. 

8. demonstrate the use of troubleshooting equipment and 
standard testing procedures. 

9. set up ladder relay logic systems and convert them to 
electronic programmable control systems. 

10. operate and maintain electrical and electronic 
programmable control systems. 



1 1 . demonstrate knowledge of basic electronic control 
circuitry, devices, and schematic diagrams. 



® 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY (EL) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program prepares students for entry-level jobs in industry 
as electrical technicians. Students develop the practical skills 
needed to work with electrical machinery, electric and 
electronic machine control devices and other electronic 
equipment. The program emphasizes electrical and electronic 
basics and includes theory and lab experience in circuitry, 
industrial electronics, electrical machinery and electrical 
construction practices. 

Types of Jobs: Electrical engineering technologist, electrical 

laboratory technician, industrial maintenance, electronic apparatus 

troubleshooter, field service technician. 

Recommended High School Subjects Two years of algebra, one 

year of science. It is strongly recommended that any mathematics 

deficiencies be corrected prior to entering the program. 

"GENERAL ELECTIVES are courses chosen from outside your program 

of concentration. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

ELT 111 Direct Current Fundamentals 

ELT 112 Basic Wiring Lab 

ELT 113 Accident Prevention 

ENL 111 English Composition I 

MTH 103 College Algebra & Trigonometry I 

PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 

ELT 122 Alternating Current Fundamentals 
ELT 124 Electrical Blueprint Reading/ 

National Electrical Code 
ELT 125 Basic Electrical Construction Lab 
ENL 121 English Composition II 
MTH 104 College Algebra &• Trigonometry II 



THIRD SEMESTER 

ELT 233 Basic Electronics 
ELT 234 Electrical Motor Control 
PHS 100 Physics-Mechanics 
PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 

Elective-General* 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

ELT 241 Electrical Systems Analysis 

ELT 244 Advanced Electrical Theory 

ELT 245 Introduction to Programmable Logic Control 

ECO 201 Principles of Economics 

PHS 101 Physics-Heat and Light 



Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 



Credits 
5 
3 
2 
3 
3 

17 

Credits 
5 

4 

3 

3 

_3 

18 

Credits 
6 

4 

4 

1 

3/4 

18/19 

Credits 
2 
3 
4 
3 
_4 

16 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

This program equips students with the skills needed to 
understand and apply electrical technology theory. The 
program includes practical skills and theoretical aspects of the 
trade. 

Upon completion of the program, the graduate should be able 
to: 

1 . demonstrate technical skills in a variety of electrical fields, 
apply skills related to recent developments in the field and 
apply accepted safety standards. 

2. demonstrate the ability to use algebra, trigonometry, and 
physics in the design, development, and analysis of 
electrical and electronic circuits and systems. 

3. complete parts lists and order forms which demonstrate 
knowledge of catalogs and of the coding and numbering of 
components, devices, hardware, and materials. 

4. interpret and develop blueprints, schematic diagrams, and 
wiring diagrams, and transform them into functioning 
systems that comply with the National Electrical Code 
and/or other specs. 

5. evaluate electrical and electronic circuits and systems, and 
communicate the results of the evaluation verbally and/or 
in writing to others in or out of the field. 

6. demonstrate basic knowledge of construction procedures 
and electrical wiring techniques. 

7. demonstrate knowledge of test equipment, 
instrumentation, and electrical/electronic theory, including 
complex numbers and the network theorems used to 
analyze, troubleshoot, repair, and operate 
electrical/electronic circuits, systems, and equipment. 

8. demonstrate knowledge of the theory and mechanics of 
rotating machinery, programmable logic control circuitry, 
transformer banks, and instrumentation. 

9. demonstrate the ability to make effective decisions and 
understand the functions of competition and the need for 
personal growth. 

10. describe United States business cycles, investments, and 
personnel policies and procedures and their relationship to 
the electrical industry. 

11. recognize the need for physical fitness and lifelong 
recreational activities. 



42 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY <ET) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program prepares students for technician level positions in 
a wide range of electronics based industries. Students learn to 
use "industry-standard" test equipment through practical 
laboratory work. The program gives students a broad 
theoretical and practical background in analog and digital 
electronic circuits and systems. 

Types of Jobs: Electronics engineering technician, electronic lab 

technician, instrumentation technician, field service technician, 

technical writer, bio-medical electronics, computer peripheral 

maintenance, communication service technician. 

Recommended High School Subjects: Two years of algebra, one 

year of science. We strongly recommend that any mathematics 

deficiencies be corrected prior to entering program. 

'GENERAL ELECTIVES are courses chosen from outside your program 

of concentration. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



ENT 


116 


ENT 


150 


ENT 


151 


ENT 


152 


ENT 


153 


ENT 


154 


ENL 


111 


MTH 


103 



Introduction to Solid State Devices 

DC for Electronics 

Direct Current Circuits Applications 

AC for Electronics 

AC Circuits Applications I 

Solid State Devices Applications 

English Composition I 

College Algebra & Trigonometry I 



Credits 
3 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
3 
_3 

18 



SECOND SEMESTER 



ENT 121 Intermediate Solid State Devices and Circuits 

ENT 127 Introduction to Digital Electronics 

ENT 161 Advanced Devices Applications 

ENT 162 Introduction to Communication Circuits and Systems 

ENT 163 Communication Circuits Applications I 

ENT 164 Digital Circuits Applications 

ENL 121 English Composition II 

or 

ENL 201 Technical Writing 

MTH 104 College Algebra & Trigonometry II 



Credits 
3 



_3 

18 



THIRD SEMESTER 

ENT 249 Introduction to Microprocessors 

ENT 250 Intermediate Communication Circuits and Systems 

ENT 251 Communication Circuits Applications II 

ENT 252 Linear Integrated Circuits 

ENT 253 Linear Circuits Applications 

ENT 254 Microprocessor Applications I 

PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 

Elective-Math/ Science or Computer Science 



Credits 
3 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3/4 

16/17 



FOURTH SEMESTER 



ENT 


260 


ENT 


261 


ENT 


262 


ENT 


263 


PED 





Software for Microprocessors 
Microprocessor Applications II 
Microprocessor Interfacing 
Microprocessor Applications III 
Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-Math/ Science or Electronics* 
Elective - General* 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
3/4 
3/4 

15/17 

"Electives: Electronics electives include ENT 248, Advanced Circuit 
Analysis and ENT 241, Calibration and Standardization. Only one of 
these two may be offered in any given year. For Transfer Students: 
The optional Math/Science or Electronics Elective is to provide 
options to meet requirements of the transfer institution. 

Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The overall goal of the Electronics Technology program is to 
prepare students for employment as electronic technicians in a 
wide variety of electronic industries or in other industries that 
use electronic systems. The program also prepares students to 
transfer to a four-year college and complete the work needed 
to earn a baccalaureate degree. (If the student plans to 
transfer, electives should be selected to meet the requirements 
of a four-year college.) 

A graduate should be able to: 

1. apply working knowledge of AC and DC circuits. 

2. demonstrate knowledge of the theory and operation of 
solid state devices. 

3. describe the theory of various electronic communication 
circuits and systems. 

4. analyze circuits containing various types of electronic 
devices. 

5. demonstrate knowledge of the theory and operation of 
logic circuits, microprocessors and digital systems. 

6. solve mathematical problems relating to circuit analysis, 
digital electronics and other systems. 

7. read and interpret a wide variety of technical literature. 

8. communicate verbally with others and write presentable 
technical reports. 

9. perform accurate and valid parameter measurements with 
laboratory test instruments. 

10. demonstrate knowledge of the theory and operation of 
linear integrated circuits. 

11. program microprocessor based systems and interface 
peripheral devices. 

12. establish good working relationships with fellow workers 
and society. 

13. apply knowledge of physical activities for the maintenance 
of good health. 

14. practice standard safety procedures. 



® 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



ENGINEERING DRAFTING 
TECHNOLOGY (ED) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program trains students to make a variety of engineering 
drawings and calculations. It provides a broad knowledge of 
mechanical drafting and engineering procedures, and 
background skills in mathematics, science and communication. 

Types of Jobs: Mechanical detail and layout drafting, engineering 

assistant or aide, checker, field department supervisor, or jobs in 

related areas such as planning, traffic safety, maintenance, and 

purchasing. 

Recommended High School Subjects: Two years of algebra, one 

year of science. 



FIRST SEMESTER 


EDT 


108 


Manufacturing Processes 


EDT 


111 


Basic Drafting I (8 weeks) 


EDT 


112 


Basic Drafting II (8 weeks) 


ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


MTH 


103 


College Algebra & Trigonometry I 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 



EDT 


121 


Power Transmission (8 weeks) 


EDT 


122 


Mechanisms (8 weeks) 


ENL 


121 


English Composition II 


MTH 


104 


College Algebra & Trigonometry II 


PED 




Fitness 8- Lifetime Sports 


THIR 


3 SEMESTER 


EDT 


231 


Detail & Assembly Drawings (8 weeks) 


EDT 


232 


Applied Drafting Techniques (8 weeks) 


PHS 


100 


Physics-Mechanics 
Elective 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

EDT 241 Advanced Detail I (8 weeks) 
EDT 242 Advanced Detail II (8 weeks) 
PHS 106 Introduction to Metallurgy 
Elective 



Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 



Credits 
3 
4 
4 
3 
3 
J 

18 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
3 
_^ 

15 

Credits 

4 

4 

4 

3/4 

15/16 

Credits 

4 

4 

4 

3/4 

15/16 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the program is to train students in the 
skills needed for a variety of entry-level jobs in engineering 
drafting. 

A graduate of this program should be able to: 

1. apply the basic elements of drafting. 

2. analyze and design simple power transmission installations. 

3. make detail and assembly drawings. 

4. detail casting drawings from sketches and models. 

5. redesign castings into weldment drawings. 

6. draw the various methods of piping. 

7. detail assembly and sub-assembly drawings from layouts. 

8. describe and apply various methods of manufacturing 
related to engineering drafting. 

9. describe and apply principles of physics and metallurgy to 
engineering drafting. 

10. use the mathematical skills needed to solve applied 
problems in engineering drafting. 

11. communicate effectively in small group and interpersonal 
situations that may occur in industry. 

12. participate as an informed citizen in a democratic society 
based on values acquired through exposure to the 
humanities and social sciences. 

13. develop fundamental skills in a lifetime sport. 

14. demonstrate fundamental skills and knowledge in the use 
of computer aided drafting (CAD). 

15. perform basic drawing functions on computer aided 
drafting equipment. 




44 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



FLORICULTURE (FL) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program prepares graduates for exciting jobs in the 
rapidly expanding industry of growing and marketing floral 
products. Production of greenhouse crops, designing and 
merchandising flower shop arrangements and interior 
plantscaping are covered in detail. 

Types of Jobs: Greenhouse plant production; floral design; flower 
sales; flower shop management; interior plantscaping; starling your 
own business. 

'GENERAL ELECTIVES are courses chosen from outside your program 
of concentration. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



OHT 


114 


Horticulture Soils 


OHT 


115 


Woody Plants 1 


OHT 


116 


Herbaceous Plants 


BIO 


111 


Basic Botany 


ENL 


111 


English Composition 1 


MTH 


500 


Technical Mathematics II 



SECOND SEMESTER 



FLR 


121 


FLR 


122 


CHM 


100 


CHM 


105 


ENL 


121 


PED 





Greenhouse Crop Production I 
Floral Design I 
Fundamentals of Chemistry 

or 
General Organic Chemistry 
English Composition II 
Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



THIRD SEMESTER 

FLR 232 Greenhouse Crop Production 
FLR 233 Floral Design II 
OHT 234 Plant Propagation 
OHT 239 Plant Insects and Diseases 
PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 

Elective-General* 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

FLR 243 Greenhouse Crop Production III 
FLR 244 Flower Shop Operation 
FLR 245 House & Conservatory Plants 
OHT 246 Horticulture Mechanics 
Elective-General* 



Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
_3 

17 

Credits 
3 
3 



3 
J 

14 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3/4 

16/17 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3/4 

15/16 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The goal of the Floriculture program is to prepare students for 
employment or self-employment in the retail florist and 
greenhouse industry or related businesses. 

A graduate of Floriculture should be able to: 

1. relate basic knowledge of botany, chemistry, and 
horticulture soils to plant growth and culture. 

2. identify the skills needed to organize thoughts and ideas 
and demonstrate the ability to communicate, verbally and 
in writing, in a manner that can be easily understood. 

3. solve math problems related to the use of soil 
amendments, fertilizers, and plant growth control 
chemicals, and apply effective cost estimating, pricing, and 
record keeping techniques. 

4. identify common trees and shrubs, ground covers, various 
annuals, biennials, and perennials by botanical and 
common names and describe the outstanding 
characteristics of each; summarize landscape, garden 
center, and greenhouse uses and cultural requirements of 
these plants. 

5. select the proper procedures, define the physiological basis, 
and describe practical applications of the reproduction of 
plants by asexual and sexual methods. 

6. describe proper design and operation of greenhouse 
environmental systems, and evaluate their advantages and 
disadvantages in commercial production. 

7. summarize and assess plant growth requirements for 
commercial production of greenhouse crops, and 
economically produce a crop from seed or cutting to 
harvest and sales. 

8. prepare salable floral designs of fresh, dried, and silk 
flowers using design guidelines, working within the time 
and cost requirements of the retail florist industry. 

9. outline the management requirements of a flower shop — 
including record keeping and employee/employer relations 
— and demonstrate skills in designing and selling the types 
of arrangements and accessories used for special 
occasions. 

10. identify and describe the effect of insects, disease, and 
physiological problems on plants, develop plans to control 
these problems, and obtain the Pennsylvania Private 
Applicator's License. 

11. demonstrate knowledge of the operation and repair of 
equipment and mechanical systems used in the floriculture 
industry. 

12. demonstrate a responsible attitude in relationships with 
employers, fellow employees, and toward the world of 
work. 

13. identify foliage plants commonly used indoors by botanical 
and common names, state distinguishing characteristics of 
each, and describe their use and culture in various indoor 
landscape areas. 

14. demonstrate an appreciation of physical fitness and lifelong 
recreational activities. 



45 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



FOOD & HOSPITALITY 
MANAGEMENT (FH) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program includes academic classroom study and practical 
laboratory work in business and personnel management, food 
preparation and supervision, and related subjects. Guest 
speakers, field trips, and directed community field work 
experiences expand students' learning experiences. 

Types of Jobs: Food service supervisory positions in restaurants, 
clubs, hospitals, nursing homes, child care centers, schools, and 
colleges; front office or housekeeping manager in hotels and motels. 
"GENERAL ELECTIVES are courses chosen from outside your program 
of concentration. 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
J[ 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
J 

16 

Credits 

1 

Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 



FIRST SEMESTER 


FHD 


111 


Introductory Foods 


FHD 


112 


Nutrition 


FHD 


115 


Purchasing, Storage, and Sanitation 


MGT 


230 


Business Communications 


MGT 


247 


Small Business Management 


1*D 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 



FHD 


121 


Quantity Food Preparation 


FHD 


125 


Menu Planning and Cost Control 


ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


PSY 


111 


General Psychology 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-General* 



PRACTICUM-SUMMER TERM 



FHD 250 



Hospitality, Dietetic Work Experience 
(Management Systems III) 



THIRD SEMESTER 



MGT 248 

FHD 236 

FHD 245 

ACC 112 

BIO 110 



Supervision and Human Relations 
Hospitality Management and Theory 
Equipment and Layouts 
Accounting I 
Human Physiology 

or 
Elective-Science 



14 



FOURTH SEMESTER 









Credits 


FHD 


126 


Front Office Management and Housekeeping** 


3 


FHD 


241 


Beverage Management and Catering 


3 


RH© 


246 


Hospitality Merchandising 


3 


ENL 


121 


English Composition II 


3 


ENL 


201 


Technical Writing 






Elective-General* 


3 

15 



"Students may take FHD 122, Diet Therapy, or FHD 201, Advanced 
Quantity Foods, in place of FHD 126, Front Office Management and 
Housekeeping. 

Co-op: 

Summer (required) 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Food and Hospitality Management 
program is to prepare students for food service management 
jobs in restaurants, schools, institutions, and catering 
operations. Options within the program allow students to 
prepare for employment in front office and housekeeping 
positions in hotels and motels. 

Upon completion of the program, the student should be able 
to: 

1. demonstrate proper techniques of food preparation and 
food handling sanitation. 

2. plan, develop and manage work schedules, job 
descriptions, menu planning, purchasing, portion control, 
and dining room and cafeteria service. 

3. describe the equipment available on the market and plan its 
arrangement, operation, and maintenance for efficiency 
and safety. 

4. demonstrate creativity and sound thinking in solving 
management problems and in merchandising techniques. 

5. conform to professional standards in personal appearance 
and demonstrate appropriate attitudes. 

6. describe the physiological effects of food in the human 
body. 

7. demonstrate a responsible attitude toward the dietetic 
profession and the community. 

8. communicate clearly, both verbally and in writing. 

9. demonstrate the ability to keep accurate food business 
records and understand the relationship between financial 
profits and good business ethics. 

10. plan and cater events; apply knowledge of all types of 
beverages. 

1 1 . demonstrate working knowledge of the factors involved in 
establishing and operating a small business in the United 
States. , 

12. demonstrate working knowledge of front office practice 
and housekeeping procedures (students who select the 
lodging option). 

13. apply knowledge of physical activities and sports in 
maintaining good health. 



46 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



FOREST TECHNOLOGY (FR) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program covers basic forestry techniques with an 
emphasis on outdoor learning and practical hands-on 
experiences. It includes both academic and specialized forestry 
courses to prepare students for a variety of jobs in industry. 

Types of Jobs: In public agencies- Forest fire control; wildlife habitat 

improvement; maintenance of forest roads, structures, and recreation 

areas; timber estimation; timber marking; stand improvement. 

In private employment - Pulpwood procurement; timber estimating; 

planning and construction of forest roads; supervision of logging 

operations; location and survey of forest property lines. 

Recommended High School Subjects: Two years of algebra, one 

year of science. 

"GENERAL ELECTIVES are courses chosen from outside your program 

of concentration. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



FOR 


111 


Dendrology 


FOR 


113 


Forest Mensuration 


FOR 


115 


Forest Botany 


ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


MTH 


103 


College Algebra & Trigonometry I 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 



FOR 


121 


FOR 


124 


FOR 


126 


ENL 


121 


MTH 


104 


PED 





Photogrammetry & Forest Surveying I 
Advanced Forest Mensuration 
Forest Ecology/Wildlife Management 
English Composition II 
College Algebra & Trigonometry II 
Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



THIRD SEMESTER 



FOR 


232 


Forest Surveying II 


FOR 


233 


Equipment and Machinery 


FOR 


234 


Timber Harvesting 


FOR 


236 


Silviculture 


MGT 


110 


Principles of Business 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

FOR 242 Forest Products 

FOR 247 Forest Land Management & Recreation 
FOR 248 Forest Protection 
ECO 201 Principles of Economics 
Elective-General* 



Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
J 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_1 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
J 

15 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3/4 

15/16 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Forest Technology program is to 
prepare students for jobs as forest technicians in public and 
private sectors of forestry and in related fields. 

The graduate of the Forest Technology program should be 
able to: 

1. write clear, grammatically correct and accurate technical 
reports and demonstrate skills in verbal communication. 

2. identify selected species of trees and shrubs by their 
scientific and common names, general uses, site 
characteristics and geographic distribution. 

3. apply the fundamentals of plane surveying — including the 
use and care of surveying equipment, maps and map 
making, and the theory of measurements. 

4. measure the volume of standing timber and the volume of 
products removed from the forest. 

5. prepare a forest land management plan for a property using 
the concepts of multiple use and sustained yield forest 
management. 

6. demonstrate knowledge of the silvicultural treatments used 
to regulate stand composition, regenerate stands, increase 
growth rates and improve timber quality. 

7. apply the basic theories, principles, and techniques used in 
timber harvesting and demonstrate skills in the operation 
and maintenance of tools and equipment used to harvest a 
forest crop. 

8. analyze the relationship between humans, other organisms, 
and the forest environment. 

9. describe the life history, food requirements, and distribution 
of the major game and non-game birds and mammals of 
Pennsylvania. 

10. identify and describe the function of tree parts and of 
selected plants and describe their relation to soil. 

11. describe the processing operations related to various forest 
products and the properties and uses of these products; 
identify and describe the characteristics and structure of 
wood. 

12. describe the characteristics and control of various forest 
pests, diseases, and fire problems. 

13. use the appropriate math skills to solve applied problems in 
the field of forestry. 

14. develop fundamental skills in lifetime sports. 

15. demonstrate responsible attitudes needed for successful 
relationships with employers, fellow employees, and the 
world of work. 



® 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



GRAPHIC ARTS (GA) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program provides practical skills in the graphic arts 
together with management, marketing, and supervisory 
training. Laboratory and shop work on modern graphic arts 
equipment develops students' skills in typesetting, pasting up 
mechanicals, and in camera, press and bindery operations. 

Types of Jobs: Graphic arts executive training, in-plant supervisors, 
self-employed printer, marketing and technical sales service. 
Recommended High School Subjects: Two years of algebra, one 
year of science. 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
1 
3 
_1 

16 

Credits 
4 
4 



FIRST SEMESTER 


GCO 511 


Layout and Design 


GCO 512 


Typographic Composition 


ENL 111 


English Composition I 


SEC 509 


Typewriting 


MTH 


Elective-Math' 


PED 


Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 



GCO 
GCO 
ENL 


521 
522 
121 


Process Camera 

Film Assembly &■ Imposition 

English Composition II 


ENL 

MGT 

PED 


201 
247 


Technical Writing 

Small Business Management 

Fitness 8- Lifetime Sports 


THIRD SEMESTER 


GCO 
GCO 
GCO 

CHM 


631 
632 
635 
109 


Platemaking, Substrates & Finishing 

Press Operations 

Printing Estimating Practices 

Chemistry for Graphic Arts 

Elective 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

GCO 641 Advanced Typographic Composition 
GCO 642 Advanced Process Camera and Stripping 
GCO 645 Printing Processes 
CSC 118 Fundamentals of Computer Science 
Elective 



3 
_1 

15 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
3 
J 

17 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 

15 



ELECTIVES should be selected from 100 and 200-level courses outside 
the program of study. 

*MTH 101 Introduction to Mathematics I, MTH 102 Introduction to 
Mathematics II, MTH 103 College Algebra & Trigonometry I, MTH 
104 College Algebra & Trigonometry II 

Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of this program is to prepare students 
for employment in the graphic arts and printing industry. 
Related courses and electives improve students' advancement 
potential and prepare graduates for additional education 
leading to a baccalaureate degree. 

A graduate of the Graphic Arts program should be able to: 

1. recognize the major printing processes, their products, and 
the advantages of each process. 

2. demonstrate the skills needed for entry level jobs (as 
advanced trainees) in the following areas: layout and 
design, copy preparation and typesetting, stripping (setting 
up camera negatives for printing), platemaking (transferring 
the copy to be printed onto a metal plate for use on a 
printing press), presswork and finishing operations 
(collating, binding, cutting, etc.). 

3. use technical knowledge of the above processes to make 
effective job-related decisions. 

4. evaluate his/her abilities and limitations in various areas of 
the graphic arts. 

5. demonstrate good work habits: promptness, willingness to 
work, and the ability to accept supervision. 

6. demonstrate knowledge of graphic arts equipment and use 
appropriate safety precautions when working around such 
equipment. 

7. compare production departments (typesetting and layout, 
camera, press and bindery) and the contributions each 
makes to the printed product. 

8. identify the problems of owning and operating a business. 

9. describe basic chemistry principles and apply them to 
graphic arts. 

10. solve basic mathematical problems related to graphic arts. 

11. write clear, concise, legible, and accurate technical reports 
using standard English. 

12. demonstrate skills in verbal communication and speak 
logically using various types of verbal communication 
techniques. 

13. demonstrate knowledge of the rules and techniques of a 
lifetime sport which will provide recreation and promote 
physical fitness. 



48 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



HUMAN SERVICE (HS) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



The Human Service program trains students to provide general 
helping, supportive and preventive services for people with 
emotional, developmental, social or physical problems. 
Students develop skills in counseling, crisis intervention, group 
work and case management. Students apply these general 
skills in analyzing specific types of agencies and through 
internships in the field. 

Types of Jobs: Entry-level positions in youth and aging programs, 
senior citizen centers, drug and alcohol counseling programs, child 
care development agencies, correctional facilities and other agencies. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

HSR 111 Introduction to Human Service 

PSY 1 1 1 General Psychology 

SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology 

ENL 111 English Composition I 

BIO 110 Applied Human Physiology 



SECOND SEMESTER 

HSR 121 Helping Process and Crisis Intervention 

HSR Human Service Seminar I* 

PSY 201 Abnormal Psychology 

ENL 121 English Composition II 

or 

ENL 201 Technical Writing 

GOV 241 State and Local Government 

PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



THIRD SEMESTER 



Fundamentals of Counseling 
Human Service Practicum I" 
Human Service Seminar II* 
Marriage and the Family 
Introduction to Mathematics I 



FOURTH SEMESTER 



HSR 


125 


HSR 


251 


HSR 




SOC 


231 


MTH 


101 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
J 

15 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 



3 
_2 

17 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
J 

15 



Credits 



HSR 240 Management and Administration in Human Services 
HSR 252 Human Service Practicum II** 
PSY 203 Developmental Psychology 
MTH 102 Introduction to Mathematics II 

or 
MTH 201 Elementary Statistics I 
Elective 



_3 

15 



'Seminar courses will include courses numbered HSR 260 - HSR 279. 

"Cooperative Education Practicum credits may be scheduled over the 
summer, reducing the course load during the third and fourth 
semesters. 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Human Service program is to 
train students as generalists in the helping professions. 
Graduates are also prepared for advanced study in social and 
human service fields. 

Graduates of the Human Service program will be able to: 

1. provide generic therapeutic, supportive and preventive 
services for people with emotional, developmental, social 
or physical problems in a variety of social or human service 
settings. 

2. demonstrate knowledge of social and human service 
delivery systems and their role within the local and national 
community. 

3. identify and link clients with resources and services 
provided by local human service agencies. 

4. apply systematic procedures to identify problems. 

5. provide basic individual and group counseling techniques to 
address identified problems. 

6. serve as a client advocate, facilitating movement of clients 
through social service systems, within a variety of agency 
settings. 

7. contribute to developing systematic programs for personal 
change. 

8. maintain progress and case notes and write objective, 
accurate reports. 

9. communicate effectively in both writing and speech. 

10. listen actively to clients, colleagues and the community. 

11. apply mathematical skills to reports, agency budgets, and 
statistical interpretations. 

12. apply principles of psychology, sociology and biology to 
human issues. 

13. understand and respect cultural differences which affect 
behavior and beliefs. 

14. contribute to effective agency planning, budgeting and 
management. 

15. understand the interrelation of physical, social and mental 
well being, and apply this knowledge. 



® 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



FIRST SEMESTER 


IND 714 


Basic Drafting (8 weeks) 


IND 715 


Machine Drafting (8 weeks) 


ENL 711 


Communications 


MTH 710 


Technical Mathematics I 



INDUSTRIAL DRAFTING (ID) 
Certificate/2 years 



This program emphasizes the development of drafting skills to 
prepare students for entry-level jobs in industry. Students will 
also study related manufacturing processes to improve their 
understanding of the industrial process and the need for 
accuracy in drafting. 

Types of Jobs: Mechanical, sheet metal, piping, civil, structural, 
architectural or electrical drafting; possible advancement opportunities 
include related jobs such as estimator or field erection supervisor. 



Credits 

5 

5 

3 

_3 

16 

Credits 

5 

5 

3 

_3 

16 

Credits 

5 

5 

3 

_3 

16 

Credits 

5 

5 

_3 

13 



SECOND SEMESTER 



IND 
IND 
EDT 
MTH 



724 
725 
108 
500 



Gears, Cams, Mechanisms (8 weeks) 
Sheet Metal and Piping 18 weeks) 
Manufacturing Processes 
Technical Mathematics II 



THIRD SEMESTER 



IND 834 
IND 835 
PHS 500 



Civil Drafting (8 weeks) 
Structural Drafting (8 weeks) 
Physics Survey 
Elective 



FOURTH SEMESTER 



IND 
IND 



844 Architectural Drafting (8 weeks) 
345 Electrical and Electronic Drafting (8 weeks) 
Elective 



Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of this program is to prepare students 
for drafting jobs in industry. Students develop skills in a variety 
of drafting techniques and take basic academic courses to 
prepare them for entry-level jobs and for advancement in their 
field. 

A graduate from this program should be able to: 

1. draw designs and details using drawing instruments. 

2. draft detailed working drawings of machinery and 
mechanical devices. 

3. indicate dimensions and tolerances, fasteners and joining 
requirements. 



® 




4. draw multiple-view assembly drawings required for the 
manufacture and repair of mechanisms. 

a. make detail drawings of gears and cams. 

b. select power transmission parts from manufacturer's 
catalogs. 

5. draw plans and details for structures using structural 
reinforcing steel, concrete, masonry, and other structural 
materials. 

6. prepare plans and details of foundations, building frames, 
floor and roof framing and other structural elements. 

7. draw electrical equipment, working drawings and wiring 
diagrams used by construction crews and repairpersons 
who install electrical equipment and wiring in power plants, 
communications centers, industrial establishments, stores, 
homes, and electrical distribution centers. 

8. draw architectural and structural features of buildings and 
other structures. 

9. calculate quality, quantity, strength, and total cost of 
materials; assure that the planned structure will meet 
building codes. 

10. prepare complete, accurate scale drawings of sheet metal 
parts and equipment used in the construction and repair of 
material conveyance equipment. 

11. draw piping plans and elevations with ability to estimate 
and draw "takeoffs" from setting plans of boilers and 
processing plants. 

12. use civil engineer's field notes showing metes and bounds, 
cross sections, and cuts and fills to prepare drawings. 

13. apply engineering data to drawings using mathematical 
calculations and basic laws of physics. 

14. write accurate technical reports using standard English. 

15. demonstrate a responsible attitude toward mechanical 
drafting and a cooperative spirit toward each person 
associated with this work. 

16. demonstrate fundamental skills and knowledge in the use 
of computer aided drafting (CAD). 

17. perform basic drawing functions on computer aided 
drafting equipment. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



JOURNALISM (JO) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



Practical courses in news and feature article writing, public 
relations, law and the mass media, copy editing, media 
photography, media management and community 
responsibility offer students a well-rounded foundation in 
journalism. Essential related studies in government, economics, 
sociology, psychology and specific areas of English are 
included. The program prepares students for a variety of entry- 
level jobs in journalism and related fields. 

Types of Jobs: Newspaper reporter, newspaper research assistant, 
news photographer, editorial assistant, advertising copywriter, 
advertising photographer, advertising layout assistant, public relations 
assistant, public relations photographer, magazine researcher, 
production person. 

Recommended High School Subjects: To succeed in this program, 
students should have completed the following sequences in high 
school: English, including grammar, composition, and literature; social 
studies and/or history, and basic mathematics. Successful completion 
of high school journalism or participation in the production of a high 
school publication will contribute to the student's success at the 
college level. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

JOU 111 News Writing 

JOU 114 Mass Media Photography 

MCM 111 Introduction to Mass Communications 

ENL 111 English Composition I 

SEC 509 Typewriting 

or passing score on typing test 

GOV 231 American Government - National 

SECOND SEMESTER 

JOU 121 Reporting Public Affairs 

JOU 122 Introduction to Newspaper Production 

MCM 122 Media and the Law 

ENL 121 English Composition II 

GOV 241 State and Local Government 

PED Fitness &• Lifetime Sports 

THIRD SEMESTER 

JOU 231 Feature Writing 

JOU 232 Copyreading and Editing 

JOU 233 Newspaper Management and Production 

ECO 201 Principles of Economics 

ENL 202 Fundamentals of Speech 

PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 

FOURTH SEMESTER 

JOU 244 Publication Management* 

MCM 242 Media Management & Community Responsibility 

MCM 243 Public Relations 

ADV 101 Advertising 

PSY 111 General Psychology 

or 
SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology 
Elective-Math or Science" 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 

J 

16 

Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
_1 

15 

Credits 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 

15 

Credits 
2 
3 
3 
3 



17 



•Cooperative Education experience approved by the Division Director 
may be substituted. 

"100 or 200-level course in biology, chemistry, environmental science, 
geography, geology, mathematics, or physics. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Journalism program is to prepare 
students for employment in small or mid-size organizations in 
journalism and related fields. 

Graduates of the Journalism program will be able to: 

1. evaluate their role as individual citizens in a community as 
well as their unique importance as trained mass media 
persons with the potential to influence the lives of others in 
the community. 

2. analyze the responsibilities of the mass media in the United 
States. 

3. state ethical canons and governmental regulations or laws 
which govern the production of mass media; correlate 
personal responsibility and those laws and canons. 

4. distinguish the philosophical and practical standards and 
goals of various forms of mass media. 

5. explain examples of the impact of mass media upon the 
history of the United States and upon society. 

6. use modern mass media copy production systems such as 
video display terminals. 

7. interview, research, and otherwise gather information 
needed to write specialized material — including basic news 
stories, feature stories, in-depth reports, reviews, public 
relations news releases and comprehensive reports, such as 
annual reports— for mass media publication. 

8. list the interrelationships between mass media and various 
types of communities, i.e., geographic, company, etc. 

9. produce basic photographic assignments for use in various 
forms of mass media, as well as in public relations media. 

10. differentiate, by statement or example, among the types of 
photographs used for news, advertising, internal public 
relations, external public relations, and formal reports. 

11. list differences in objectives and techniques of writing for 
various forms of mass media, including newspapers, 
magazines, annual reports, trade journals, house organs, 
etc. 

12. coordinate, organize and produce examples of club 
bulletins, house organs, employee newsletters and similar 
small publications. 

13. produce preliminary advertising copy and layouts for small 
publications or a small advertising agency. 

14. list individual goals of and delineate differences among 
various forms of writing — including the objective, the 
subjective, biased, persuasive and propagandized. 

15. explain the relationship among various forms of mass 
media in terms of philosophical goals balanced by 
consideration of business practices. 

16. delineate the roles of individuals in the organizational 
structure of various forms of mass media; provide 
examples demonstrating the interrelationships of those 
individuals. 

17. state and provide examples of effective management 
practices peculiar to various forms of mass media. 



51 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



MACHINE TOOL TECHNOLOGY (TT) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program prepares students to work with engineers and 
shop superintendents. Students develop skills in machine 
operation and theory, blueprint reading and mechanical 
drawing in the program's labs and shops. Training in job 
routing and the order in which operations are performed is 
included. In the third semester the emphasis is on CNC — 
computer numerical control — systems and computer part 
programming capabilities. The program includes discussions of 
such topics as robotics, graphics, group technology, future 
trends, and numerical control terms, definitions and standards. 
Related courses in mathematics, science and physics improve 
students' advancement potential. 

Types of Jobs: Toolmaker; experimental numerical controller; 
production technician; administrative assistant. 
Recommended High School Subjects: Two years of algebra, one 
year of science. 



Credits 
5 
5 
3 
3 
_J 

17 

Credits 

5 

5 

3 

_3 

16 

Credits 

5 

5 

4 

_2 

16 

Credits 
5 
5 
4 

_2 

15 



FIRST SEMESTER 


MTT 


511 


Machining I (8 weeks) 


MTT 


512 


Machining II (8 weeks) 


ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


MTH 


103 


College Algebra & Trigonometry I 


PED 




Fitness it Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 



MTT 
MTT 
ENL 
MTH 



521 
522 
121 

104 



Automatic Machines (8 weeks) 
Industrial Metrology (8 weeks) 
English Composition II 
College Algebra & Trigonometry 



THIRD SEMESTER 



MTT 
MTT 
PHS 
EDT 



631 
632 
100 
101 



Tooling Technology I (8 weeks) 
Tooling Technology II (8 weeks) 
Physics-Mechanics 
Mechanical Drawing 



FOURTH SEMESTER 



MTT 641 

MTT 642 

PHS 106 
PED 



Abrasive Machining (8 weeks) 

Heat Treatment and Cutter Grinding (8 weeks) 

Introduction to Metallurgy 

Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



Co-op Options: 

Alternating 

Parallel 

Summer 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The overall objective is to prepare students for jobs in the 
machine tool industry. 




A graduate of the Machine Tool Technology program should 
be able to: 

1 . demonstrate safe work habits and be conscious of safety 
when working with machinery. 

2. read blueprints, interpret drawings, understand 
specifications, and establish tolerances. 

3. apply mathematics in the machine tool trade (speeds, 
feeds, thread measurement, sinebar, etc.). 

4. apply the principles of physics and metallurgy to the 
science of heat treatment operations including: 

a. hardening of steel 

b. carburizing 

c. case hardening 

d. tempering 

e. annealing 

5. operate basic machine tools and demonstrate knowledge of 
their construction in relation to the metal industry. 

6. describe the construction and operation of production 
machinery, including turret lathes, screw machines, 
automatic tappers, etc. 

7. demonstrate skills on numerical control machine, electrical 
discharge machine, electrical chemical grinder, digital 
readout, diemaking, jig grinding, jigs and fixtures. 

8. operate abrasive cutting machinery and select and plan 
machining operations on this equipment. 

9. demonstrate skills in quality control, inspection, gaging 
methods, and production control as they relate to 
manufacturing design and production. 

10. demonstrate basic verbal communication skills, speak 
logically, and use various types of verbal and written 
communication techniques to promote good business 
relationships, to develop leadership, and to establish good 
employer-employee-customer relationships. 

11. demonstrate knowledge of a lifetime sport which will 
provide recreation and promote physical fitness. 



52 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



MACHINIST GENERAL (MG) 
Certificate/2 years 



This program offers training on machine tools commonly used 
in most shops. It emphasizes practical machine skills. 
Classroom analysis of various jobs and machine operations 
increases the student's capabilities as a machinist. General 
mathematics, science, and communications skills are included 
to prepare students to work with technical advances in the 
machining industry. 

Types of Jobs: Machinist, machine repair mechanic, setup person for 
production line work, skilled toolroom mechanic, technical sales, 
manufacturing supervision, or machine shop ownership. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

MTT 511 Machining I (8 weeks) 
MTT 512 Machining II (8 weeks) 
MTH 710 Technical Mathematics I 



SECOND SEMESTER 

MTT 521 Automatic Machines (8 weeks) 
MTT 522 Industrial Metrology (8 weeks) 
MTH 500 Technical Mathematics II 
Elective 



THIRD SEMESTER 

MTT 631 Tooling Technology I (8 weeks) 

MTT 632 Tooling Technology II (8 weeks) 

PHS 500 Physics Survey 

ENL 711 Communications 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

MTT 641 Abrasive Machining (8 weeks) 

MTT 642 Heat Treatment and Cutter Grinding (8 weeks) 

EDT 101 Mechanical Drawing 

Elective or Approved Co-op 



Co-op Options: 

Alternating 

Parallel 

Summer 



Credits 

5 

5 

_3 

13 

Credits 

5 

5 

3 

_3 

16 

Credits 

5 

5 

3 

J 

16 

Credits 

5 

5 

2 

_3 

15 




PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The overall objective of this program is to prepare students for 
jobs in the machining industry. 

A graduate of the Machinist General program should be able 
to: 

1 . demonstrate safe work habits and be conscious of safety 
when operating machine tools and equipment. 

2. demonstrate working knowledge of blueprint reading; work 
from sketches of parts. 

3. develop and use mathematical formulas to compute 
coordinates and solve gearing and threading problems. 

4. apply basic knowledge of physics-mechanics to machine 
tool problems such as power transmission, machining, etc. 

5. operate and set up basic machine tools. 

6. operate machine tools to produce gears, threads, and 
gages. 

7. operate and set up numerically controlled machines, 
electrical discharge, and electrical chemical machines. 

8. operate various types of abrasive cutting machines and 
practice heat treating of metals, for example, hardening, 
annealing, and carburizing. 

9. prepare and revise technical papers used in operating 
machine tools and machining procedure. 



53 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



MATHEMATICAL COMPUTER 
SCIENCE (MC) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program is designed to prepare students for transfer to 
four-year institutions as well as for entry-level positions in 
programming. Mathematical Computer Science emphasizes 
mathematics, problem solving skills, the theory of computing, 
how a computer works, and the structure of programming 
languages like Pascal, BASIC, FORTRAN and machine 
languages. See page 5 for special admission requirements for 
this program. 

Types of Jobs: Systems programmer trainees or programmer 
trainees. Students who transfer and complete a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Computer Science would be qualified for positions as 
systems programmers and application programmers in engineering, 
science or mathematics. 

Required High School Courses: Two years of algebra, one year of 
trigonometry, one year of a laboratory science, and three years of 
English. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

ENL 111 English Composition I 
MTH 238 Calculus I 
MCS 111 Theory of Programming I 
ECO 201 Principles of Economics 
Elective - General Core* 



SECOND SEMESTER 



ENL 201 
MTH 248 
MCS 121 



PED 



Technical Writing 

Calculus II 

Theory of Programming II 

Elective** 

Elective - Social Science/ Humanities 

Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



THIRD SEMESTER 

MTH 203 Statistics with Computer Methods 
MTH 237 Discrete Mathematics 
MCS 201 Data Structures 
PHS 116 General Physics I 

or 
CHM 111 General Chemistry I 

Elective - General Core* 



FOURTH SEMESTER 


MTH 249 
MCS 202 
PHS 126 


Linear Algebra 

Machine Language Programming 

General Physics II 


CHM 121 
PED 


General Chemistry II 

Elective** 

Fitness 8- Lifetime Sports 



Credits 
3 
4 
4 
3 

17 

Credits 
3 
4 
4 
3 
3 
_1 

18 

Credits 
3 
3 
4 



_3 

17 

Credits 
3 

4 



3 
15 



•See page 73 for a list of General Core subjects. 



54 



**lt is recommended that these be used to develop depth in a 
technical area related to computer science or to facilitate transfer to 
a four-year institution. All electives must be approved by student's 
advisor. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

This program is designed to prepare students to successfully 
transfer— with full junior status — to computer science 
programs at four-year institutions. 

A graduate of Mathematical Computer Science should be able 
to: 

1 . demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical concepts 
of discrete and continuous mathematics. 

2. demonstrate the use of mathematical principles to solve 
problems through modeling and programming. 

3. demonstrate an understanding of the structure of a 
computer system and the interaction of hardware and 
software. 

4. demonstrate an understanding of structured programming. 

5. demonstrate the ability to use step-wise refinement to 
analyze a problem and determine a computer solution that 
is logical, well-structured, and easy to understand and use. 

6. demonstrate an understanding of the organization and 
structure of data. 

7. demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between 
mathematics and computer science. 

8. use the computer to solve a wide variety of problems taken 
from the realms of mathematics, science and business. 

9. demonstrate the ability to apply the scientific method 
through experimentation in the natural sciences. 

10. communicate clearly and concisely and use and produce 
written technical materials. 

1 1 . demonstrate a responsible attitude toward personal 
organization of time, work habits, and the creation of 
quality products. 

12. appreciate sports and other leisure activities. 

13. apply general knowledge of the social and natural sciences 
and understand their effect on our environment. 

14. demonstrate the academic background necessary to 
transfer to a baccalaureate program in computer science. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



NURSERY MANAGEMENT (NM) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



Nursery management offers rewarding careers to those who 
enjoy working in the outdoors. This program prepares students 
for the job opportunities available to college graduates in this 
growing industry. Students study nursery production, garden 
center sales, and landscape design, installation and 
maintenance. The operation of landscape and nursery 
equipment, and the construction of landscape features- 
including walks, walls and patios — are covered in labs. 

Types of Jobs: Propagation and production of trees and shrubs in 
field or container nurseries; nursery stock buyer; agent or salesperson; 
garden center sales; horticulturist with a government agency (city, 
state, federal!, landscaping, turfgrass installation and maintenance; 
starting your own business. 

'GENERAL ELECTIVES are courses chosen from outside your program 
of concentration. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



OHT 


114 


Horticulture Soils 


OHT 


115 


Woody Plants 1 


OHT 


116 


Herbaceous Plants 


BIO 


111 


Basic Botany 


ENL 


111 


English Composition 1 


MTH 


500 


Technical Mathematics II 



SECOND SEMESTER 

NMG 121 Nursery Production I 

NMG 126 Woody Plants II 

CHM 100 Fundamentals of Chemistry 

or 

CHM 105 General Organic Chemistry 

ENL 121 English Composition II 

PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



THIRD SEMESTER 



NMG 


232 


Nursery Production II 


NMG 


237 


Woody Plants III 


OHT 


234 


Plant Propagation 


OHT 


239 


Plant Insects and Diseases 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-General" 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

NMG 245 Landscape Construction 
NMG 248 Landscape Maintenance 
NMG 249 Landscape Design 
OHT 246 Horticulture Mechanics 
Elective-General* 



Co-op Options; 
Parallel 
Summer 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
_3 

17 

Credits 
3 
3 



3 

_2 

14 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3/4 

16/17 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3/4 

15/16 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The goal of Nursery Management is to prepare students for 
employment or self-employment in such jobs as growing 
nursery crops, retail and garden center sales, and landscape 
work. 

A graduate of Nursery Management should be able to: 

1. apply basic knowledge of botany, chemistry, and 
horticulture soils to plant growth and culture. 

2. identify the skills needed to organize thoughts and ideas 
and communicate, verbally and in writing, in a manner that 
can be easily understood. 

3. solve math problems related to the use of soil 
amendments, fertilizers, and plant growth control 
chemicals, and apply cost estimating, pricing, and record 
keeping techniques. 

4. identify deciduous trees and shrubs, narrow and broad- 
leaved evergreens, cultivars, and varieties by botanical and 
common name and point out their distinguishing 
characteristics, landscape uses and applications. 

5. identify various annuals, biennials, and perennial 
herbaceous plants, and summarize landscape, garden 
center, and greenhouse use and the growth requirements 
of these plants. 

6. describe the various types of nurseries, nursery growing 
structures, related facilities, equipment, and handtools and 
define the proper location for and the design factors of 
nursery facilities. 

7. demonstrate the ability to grow commercial plants in field 
and container operations on a scheduled production basis. 

8. identify and describe the effect of insects, diseases, and 
physiological problems on plants, plan for proper control of 
these problems, and obtain the Pennsylvania Private 
Applicator's License. 

9. select the proper procedures, define the physiological basis, 
and describe practical applications of the reproduction of 
plants by sexual and asexual methods. 

10. explain the proper and effective use of woody and 
herbaceous plant materials in developing public and 
domestic landscape areas. 

11. create landscape features such as waterfalls, pools, steps, 
walks, walls, and patios using materials like flagstone, 
brick, railroad ties and mountain stone. 

12. identify turfgrass varieties and uses, and demonstrate an 
understanding of the establishment and maintenance of 
turf areas. 

13. apply skills in pruning, fertilizing, and spraying in 
maintaining existing landscapes, fruit trees and other fruit- 
bearing plants. 

14. demonstrate knowledge of the operation and repair of 
equipment and mechanical systems used in the nursery 
industry. 

15. demonstrate a responsible attitude in relationships with 
employers, fellow employees, and the world of work. 

16. demonstrate an appreciation of physical fitness and lifelong 
recreational activities. 



55 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



OUTDOOR POWER EQUIPMENT (SM) 
Certificate/1 year 



Outdoor Power Equipment prepares students to troubleshoot, 
service and repair power systems used in small engines and 
recreational vehicles. The program covers two and four-stroke 
cycle gasoline and small diesel engines. Students also learn to 
repair transmissions and drive systems commonly used in 
outdoor power equipment and recreational vehicles. 

Types of Jobs: Motorcycle repairer (mechanic), motorcycle tester, 
engine repairer, gas engine repairer, power saw mechanic, small 
engine mechanic, outboard motor mechanic, outboard motor tester, 
lawnmower mechanic, factory service technician. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

OPE 710 Small Engine Fundamentals (8 weeks) 

OPE 711 Drive Units and Systems (8 weeks) 

MTH 710 Technical Mathematics I 

WEL 100 Introduction to Welding Processes 



Credits 

5 

5 

3 

_3 

16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Credits 

OPE 721 Operation, Repair and Maintenance (8 weeks) 5 

OPE 722 Shop Operation and Customer Relations (8 weeks) 5 

ENL 711 Communications 3 

Elective 3/4 

16/17 





PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The objective of this program is to prepare students for 
employment in the field of outdoor power equipment. 

Graduates of Outdoor Power Equipment should be able to: 

1. safely and correctly use and care for the tools of the trade. 

2. explain the principles of operation of two and four-stroke 
cycle engines. 

3. troubleshoot, repair and service most types of small 
engines. 

4. repair and service most types of transmissions and drive 
systems common to outdoor power equipment and 
recreational vehicles. 

5. operate and repair most types of outdoor power equipment 
and recreational vehicles. 

6. read and use parts books and service manuals and 
understand their contents. 

7. look and conduct themselves in a manner leading to 
positive employee-employer and employee-customer 
relations. 

8. demonstrate the ability to manage or operate a repair shop 
using correct bookkeeping, inventory control and warranty 
procedures. 

9. perform basic welding, cutting and brazing tasks using 
electric arc and oxyacetylene equipment. 

10. write clear, concise, legible and accurate technical reports, 
warranty forms, shop repair orders, etc. 

11. solve basic mathematical problems. 



56 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



PLUMBING & HEATING (PL) 
Certificate/2 years 



This program includes the basic theories of plumbing and 
heating, soil waste and vent layout, household and industrial 
maintenance, sewage systems, and the use of hand and power 
tools. Students develop skills in all types of plumbing and 
heating repair work used in residential, institutional, and 
commercial applications. The program also provides training in 
the fundamentals of communication and mathematics. 

Types of Jobs: Plumbing and heating installation, industrial 
maintenance, public utilities service, machine work and shipbuilding 
industries. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

PLH 711 Basic Plumbing (First 8 weeks) 

PLH 712 Advanced Plumbing Skills (Second 8 weeks) 

BCT 254 Carpentry for the Trades 

MTH 710 Technical Mathematics I 



SECOND SEMESTER 



Credits 

6 

6 

2 

_3 

17 
Credits 



PLH 721 Plumbing Systems and Blueprints (First 8 weeks) 

PLH 722 Advanced Systems and Codes (Second 8 weeks) 

WEL 703 Electric Welding 

ENL 711 Communications 



6 

6 

2 

_3 

17 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Credits 

PLH 833 Heat Loss Calculations - Pipe Welding (First 8 weeks) 7 

PLH 832 Hot Water Heat - Heat Conservation (Second 8 weeks) 6 

ELT 110 Electricity for the Trades 3 

Optional Elective 0/3 

167l9 

FOURTH SEMESTER 

Credits 

PLH 841 Steam Heat and Pipefitting (First 8 weeks) 6 

PLH 842 Field Work and Advanced Skills (Second 8 weeks) 6 

Optional Elective 0/3 

12/15 

Co-op Options: 

Alternating 

Parallel 

Summer 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The goal of the Plumbing and Heating program is to prepare 
students for entry-level jobs in plumbing and heating. 

A graduate of the Plumbing and Heating program should be 
able to: 

1 . demonstrate good work habits and meet accepted safety 
standards. 

2. use hand and power tools of the trade. 

3. identify piping materials and install them using proper 
connections. 

4. use and apply trade terms and technical data. 

5. read and interpret blueprints, specifications, and codes as 
they apply to the trade. 

6. lay out, estimate, calculate, and use mathematical skills 
required in the trade. 

7. install, maintain, and repair plumbing and heating 
mechanical systems and equipment and keep up with new 
developments in the field. 

8. demonstrate the ability to write letters of application, 
memos, work orders, and reports, and apply 
communication skills on the job. 

9. demonstrate welding skills required in plumbing and 
heating. 

10. apply basic knowledge and skills of electrical work to 
install, repair, maintain, and troubleshoot electrical controls 
used in plumbing and heating. 

11. identify the principles involved in the collection, storage 
and use of solar energy for space and domestic water 
heating. 

12. apply energy conservation measures to plumbing and 
heating installations. 




® 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



PRACTICAL NURSING (NU) 
Certificate/3 semesters 



This three-semester program is designed to prepare students 
to enter the field of practical nursing, or to continue their 
education at the baccalaureate level. Classroom instruction in 
theory and basic skills is given on campus; practical experience 
in actual client-care settings is obtained at local hospitals and 
nursing homes. Students enrolling at the Williamsport campus 
gain practical experience at the Williamsport Hospital, Divine 
Providence Hospital, and at the Lysock View Home and 
Hospital. Wellsboro students acquire experience at Soldiers 
and Sailors Memorial Hospital and the Green Home. Under the 
guidance of college instructors at the the cooperating 
agencies, students gain experience in the care of clients of all 
ages. 

Students enrolled in this program must earn a minimum final 
grade of "C" in each of their nursing courses. Failure to do so 
will result in termination from the program. Students interested 
in continuing their education at the baccalaureate level are 
advised to complete a fourth semester at the College. Fourth 
semester courses should be selected based on the 
requirements of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program 
they plan to pursue, and might include chemistry, 
microbiology, sociology, statistics, English Composition II, 
psychology, and fitness and lifetime sports. Students 
interested in the Practical Nursing program must also meet 
special admission requirements described on page 5 in this 
Catalog. 

Types of Jobs: Employment in hospitals, convalescent homes, visiting 
nurses associations, home health care, doctor's and dentist's offices 
and private care. 

Recommended High School Subjects: Four units of high school 
English, three units of social studies, two units of mathematics (one of 
which is algebra), and two units of science with a related laboratory. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

NUR 101 Fundamentals of Nursing 

BIO 115 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 

ENL 111 English Composition I 

SECOND SEMESTER 

NUR 201 Nursing Care of Adult & Child I 
BIO 125 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 
PSY 1 1 1 General Psychology 

THIRD SEMESTER 

NUR 301 Nursing Care of Adult & Child II 
Elective* 



•Recommended Elective: Introduction to Microcomputers or 
Developmental Psychology. 

Theory-624 Hours, 2/5 Ratio 
Practicum-912 Hours, 3/5 Ratio 
Total- 1536 Hours 



Credits 

12 

4 

_3 

19 

Credits 

14 

4 

J 

21 

Credits 
16 
J 

19 



® 




PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

A graduate of the Practical Nursing program will be able to 
share in the care of the sick, in rehabilitation, and in the 
prevention of illness — always under the direction of a 
licensed physician and/or registered professional nurse. The 
fundamental aim of the program is to prepare a graduate who 
is eligible for licensure as a practical nurse. The secondary 
purpose is to prepare the graduate to transfer into an associate 
degree or baccalaureate nursing program or other health 
related field of study. 

At the completion of the Practical Nursing program, the 
graduate should be able to: 

1 . use — under supervision — scientific knowledge and skills 
necessary to plan and provide safe and comprehensive 
client-centered nursing care in all settings where practical 
nursing takes place. 

2. provide nursing care that reflects accurate assessments of 
the client's growth and development. 

3. use problem-solving approaches in administering nursing 
care. 

4. use effective communication skills. 

5. assist the registered nurse in the care of the acutely ill 
client. 

6. demonstrate knowledge of the role of community health 
agencies in meeting health needs of society. 

7. demonstrate an acceptable code of legal/ethical behavior 
according to standards set by health care delivery agencies. 

8. recognize and accept responsibility for continuing 
education. 

9. meet eligibility requirements needed to take the state Board 
of Nursing Examination necessary for licensure. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



PRINTING (GP) 
Certificate/2 years 



This program provides practical skills training in all printing 
operations. Students learn to set type, to paste up type, to 
operate cameras and printing presses. Finishing operations - 
collating, binding and cutting — are also covered. 

Types of Jobs: Camera work, stripper, layout work, compositor, 
platemaker, and press work. 



FIRST SEMESTER 


GCO 


511 


Layout and Design 


GCO 


512 


Typographic Composition 


ENL 


711 


Communications 


MTH 


710 


Technical Mathematics I 


SEC 


509 


Typewriting 



SECOND SEMESTER 

GCO 521 Process Camera 
GCO 522 Film Assembly and Imposition 
MGT 247 Small Business Management 
MTH 500 Technical Mathematics II 
Elective 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
3 
_^ 

15 

Credits 
4 
4 
3 
3 
_3 

17 




THIRD SEMESTER 

GCO 631 Platemaking, Substrates 8- Finishing 
GCO 632 Press Operations 
GCO 635 Printing Estimating Practices 
CHM 109 Chemistry for Graphic Arts 
Elective 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

GCO 641 Advanced Typographic Composition 

GCO 642 Advanced Process Camera and Stripping 

GCO 645 Printing Processes 

CSC 118 Fundamentals of Computer Science 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
3 
J 

17 

Credits 

3 

3 

3 

J 

12 



Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Printing program is to prepare 
students for employment in the printing industry. 

A graduate of the Printing program should be able to: 

1. recognize the major printing processes, their products, and 
the advantages of each process. 

2. demonstrate the skills needed for entry-level jobs (as 
advanced trainees) in the following areas: layout and 
design, copy preparation and typesetting, stripping (setting 
up camera negatives for printing), platemaking (transferring 
copy to be printed onto a metal plate for use on a printing 
press), presswork and finishing operations (collating, 
binding, cutting, etc.). 

3. evaluate his/her abilities and limitations in various areas of 
the graphic arts. 

4. demonstrate good work habits: promptness, willingness to 
work, and the ability to accept supervision. 

5. demonstrate knowledge of equipment and use appropriate 
safety precautions when working around such equipment. 

6. compare production departments (typesetting and layout, 
camera, press and bindery) and the contributions each 
makes to the final product. 

7. write clear, concise, legible, and accurate technical reports 
using standard English. 

8. demonstrate skill in basic verbal communications. 

9. solve basic math problems related to printing operations. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



QUANTITY FOOD PRODUCTION AND 
SERVICE (QF) 

Certificate/1 year 



Quantity Foods is designed to prepare students for a variety of 
careers in the food industry. The program covers the essentials 
of food preparation with the emphasis on theoretical 
preparation, basic skills and hands-on experience. 

Types of Jobs: Short order cook, sous chef, kitchen worker, salad 
preparation and cold buffet cook, waiter, waitress, bus person, 
hostess, cashier. 

Recommended High School Subjects: High school courses in home 
economics with an emphasis on food preparation would be helpful, but 
are not required. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



QFP 510 Introduction to Food Service (8 weeks) 

QFP 511 Salads, Soups and Sandwich Preparation (8 weeks) 

QFP 520 Management and Production Techniques (8 weeks) 

QFP 521 Desserts, Sauces and Meat Preparation (8 weeks) 

MTH 710 Technical Mathematics I 



Credits 
3 



4 

3 

4 

_3 

17 



SECOND SEMESTER 

QFP 530 Techniques of Food Production (8 weeks) 
QFP 531 Starches and Entree Production (8 weeks) 
QFP 540 Advanced Techniques of Food Production and 

Services (8 weeks) 
QFP 541 Short Order Preparation (8 weeks) 
ENL 711 Communications 



Credits 
3 

4 

3 

4 

J 

17 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 



The general objective of the Quantity Foods program is to 
prepare students for jobs in the quantity foods industry and to 
provide the background needed for advanced training — either 
on-the-job or at the college level. 

Graduates should be able to: 

1. understand and practice high levels of sanitation and 
safety. 

2. use small equipment safely and quickly. 

3. read recipes, measure and portion correctly. 

4. operate and clean large equipment typical of a commercial 
kitchen. 

5. practice methods of work simplification and accurately time 
food preparation. 

6. purchase, store and handle foods correctly. 

7. prepare and artfully present a variety of foods typical of 
restaurant and institutional food service. 




8. work cooperatively with kitchen personnel. 

9. perform front-of-the-house duties with ease. 

10. demonstrate awareness of job opportunities in the food 
service industry. 

1 1 . demonstrate awareness of good nutritional guidelines and 
practices for conserving nutrition. 

12. apply knowledge of mathematics in determining recipe 
adjustments, in food cost accounting, and in front-of-the- 
house accounting. 

13. demonstrate the ability to write letters of application, 
memos, purchase orders and reports, and apply 
communication skills on the job. 



60 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



RADIOGRAPHY (RT) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



FIRST SEMESTER 


RAD 


110 


Radiologic Technology I 


BIO 


115 


Human Anatomy and Physiology I 


MTR 


101 


Medical Terminology I 


ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


MTH 


103 


College Algebra & Trigonometry I 



This program includes courses in anatomy, physiology, 
physics, medical terminology and professional ethics, in 
radiologic equipment and safety, and in English and 
mathematics. Practical experience with sick and injured 
patients — under qualified technical supervision in cooperating 
local hospitals — is an important aspect of the program. 
Internships in affiliated hospitals — required to meet eligibility 
requirements for registry exams — are scheduled during the 
summer. 

This program must be completed within 24 consecutive 
months. Approximately 2300 practicum hours are included to 
qualify students to take the registry examination. See page 5 
for special admission requirements for this program. 

Types of Jobs: Hospital facilities, doctors and radiologists in private 
practice, civilian and military government agencies, industry. 
Recommended High School Subjects: Two years of algebra. 



Credits 
5 
4 
3 
3 
_3 

18 

Credits 

7 

4 

4 

J 

18 

Credits 
1 

Credits 

10 

3 

_3 

16 

Credits 

10 

3 

16 

Credits 
1 



SECOND SEMESTER 



RAD 


120 


BIO 


125 


PHS 


112 


MTH 


104 


SUMMER 



Radiologic Technology II 
Human Anatomy and Physiology 
Introductory Physics 
College Algebra & Trigonometry I 



RAD 201 Summer Internship 
THIRD SEMESTER 

RAD 230 Radiologic Technology III 
PHS 122 Radiation Physics 

Elective-Psychology* 

FOURTH SEMESTER 

RAD 240 Radiologic Technology IV 
ENL 121 English Composition II 
SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology 

SUMMER 

RAD 202 Summer Internship 

"Psychology Electives: 
PSY 111 General Psychology 
PSY 201 Abnormal Psychology 
PSY 241 Social Psychology 



NOTE: Radiography students are exempted from the College's required 
Fitness &■ Lifetime Sports courses. 




PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general program objective is to provide students with 
academic and practical experiences to prepare them to pass 
the National Radiological Technology Registry Examination and 
to qualify for employment as registered radiographers. 

Upon completion of the two-year Radiography program 
students should be able to: 

1 . apply knowledge acquired in radiation protection courses in 
the clinic — as it applies to patients, him or herself, and 
others. 

2. use knowledge of anatomy, positioning, and radiographic 
techniques to accurately show anatomical structures on a 
radiograph. 

3. determine exposure factors needed to produce the best 
radiographs possible with minimum radiation exposure to 
the patient. 

4. recognize differences between diagnostic quality and 
inferior radiographs. 

5. exercise discretion and good judgment in all aspects of 
work. 

6. provide for the physical and emotional needs of the patient. 

7. recognize patient emergencies and initiate lifesaving first 
aid. 

8. apply knowledge of mathematics in determining exposure 
factors. 

9. use effective communication skills. 

10. use correct medical and anatomical terminology in 
radiography work. 

11. apply the necessary knowledge of basic electronics and 
physics to radiographic work. 



® 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



RETAIL MANAGEMENT (RM) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program provides a strong background in marketing, 
merchandising, retailing, and related business fields. 

Types of Jobs: Retailers, buyers, wholesalers, purchasing agents, 
sales managers, salespersons, salesworkers, marketing managers, 
distribution managers. 

FIRST SEMESTER 







Credits 


ACC 112 


Accounting 1 


3 


MGT 110 


Principles of Business ' 


3 


MGT 111 


Business Mathematics 


3 


SEC 111 


Typewriting 1 


3 


ENL 111 


English Composition 1 


3 


PED 


Fitness & Lifetime Sports 


1 
16 


SECOND SEMESTER 








Credits 


ECO 201 


Principles of Economics 


3 


MGT 230 


Business Communications 


3 


MGT 231 


Business Law 1 


3 


MKT 233 


Retail Principles 


3 


ENL 202 


Fundamentals of Speech 


3 


PED 


Fitness & Lifetime Sports 


1 
16 


THIRD SEMESTER 








Credits 


MKT 243 


Sales 


3 


MKT 247 


Retail Management 


3 


CSC 118 


Fundamentals of Computer Science ^ 


3 


MKT 240 


Marketing 


3 




Elective or Approved Co-op 


3 
15 


FOURTH SEMESTER 








Credits 


ADV 101 


Advertising 


3 


MGT 248 


Supervision & Human Relations 


3 


MKT 245 


Fashion Merchandising and Display 


4 




Elective-Social Science/ Humanities 


3 




Elective 


3 

16 


Co-op Options: 




Parallel 




Summer 





EVENING PROGRAM 

Courses required for the associate degree in Retail 
Management are also offered in the evenings for the 
convenience of students who are unable to attend classes 
during the day. Students may complete all courses required for 
a degree in Retail Management by enrolling in evening courses 
on a part-time basis. Part-time students may require more than 
two years to complete the program. 



® 




PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general goal of the Retail Management program is to 
prepare graduates for middle management level jobs in the 
private sector of the retail and/or wholesale field. The program 
will also upgrade the skills of those now employed in the field. 

The graduate should be able to: 

1. review and evaluate the administrative processes and 
policies for marketing and retail merchandising. 

2. evaluate customer behavior and motivation as it applies to 
a profitable enterprise. 

3. develop advertising campaigns using the media that is most 
effective in terms of cost, consumer appeal, and desired 
results. 

4. explain the steps involved in identifying and segmenting a 
market. 

5. relate in a positive manner to supervisors, peers, and 
subordinates. 

6. demonstrate skills in effective verbal and written 
communications. 

7. apply analytical techniques in preparing financial 
statements and inventory systems. 

8. demonstrate general knowledge of electronic data 
processing, point of sale equipment and microcomputer 
applications. 

9. identify the laws affecting business. 

10. identify the need for physical fitness and positive leisure 
activities. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



SECRETARIAL OFFICE 

ADMINISTRATION (SA) 

(Executive) 

Associate Degree/2 years 



FIRST SEMESTER 


MGT 


230 


Business Communications 


MGT 


111 


Business Mathematics 


SEC 


111 


Typewriting I 


SEC 


114 


Shorthand I 


ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 



This program provides skills in typing, shorthand, word 
processing, and general office practices. Courses in 
accounting, business, microcomputers and liberal studies are 
included in the program. 

Types of Jobs: Business, commerce, government, industry, or the 
professions. 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
J[ 

16 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
J 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
_3 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
2 
3 
1 
_3 
15 



ACC 
SEC 
SEC 
SEC 

PED 



112 Accounting I 
121 Typewriting II 

124 Shorthand II 

125 Secretarial and Administrative Procedures 
Elective-Social Science/ Humanities 
Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



THIRD SEMESTER 

SEC 231 Typewriting III 

SEC 236 Specialized Terminology and Transcription 

MGT 110 Principles of Business 

WDP 121 Word Processing I 

CSC 104 Microcomputer Fundamentals 

ENL 202 Fundamentals of Speech 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

SEC 246 Secretarial Microtranscription 
SEC 247 Secretarial Office Simulation 
SEC 242 Professional Internship 
MGT 248 Supervision and Human Relations 
CSC Microcomputer Elective* 

Elective 



"CSC 105 is not acceptable. 

Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 



SECRETARIAL OFFICE 

ADMINISTRATION (SA) 

(Legal) 

Associate Degree/2 years 



MGT 


230 


Business Communications 


MGT 


111 


Business Mathematics 


SEC 


111 


Typewriting 1 


SEC 


114 


Shorthand 1 


ENL 


111 


English Composition 1 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 



This program provides skills in typing, shorthand, word 
processing and general office practices. Courses in business 
law, microcomputers and liberal studies are included in the 
program. 

Types of Jobs: Business, commerce, and law. 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
2 
3 
1 
J 

15 



ACC 
SEC 
SEC 
SEC 

PED 



112 Accounting I 
121 Typewriting II 

124 Shorthand II 

125 Secretarial and Administrative Procedures 
Elective-Social Science/ Humanities 
Fitness 8- Lifetime Sports 



THIRD SEMESTER 

SEC 231 Typewriting III 

SEC 236 Specialized Terminology and Transcription 

ENL 202 Fundamentals of Speech 

MGT 231 Business Law I 

WDP 121 Word Processing I 

CSC 104 Microcomputer Fundamentals 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

SEC 246 Secretarial Microtranscription 
SEC 247 Secretarial Office Simulation 
SEC 242 Professional Internship 
MGT 241 Business Law II 
CSC Microcomputer Elective* 

Elective 



*CSC 105 is not acceptable. 

Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 



63 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



SECRETARIAL OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION (SA) 

(Medical) 

Associate Degree/2 years 



FIRST SEMESTER 


MGT 230 


Business Communications 


MGT 111 


Business Mathematics 


SEC 111 


Typewriting I 


SEC 114 


Shorthand I 


ENL 111 


English Composition I 


PED 


Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



This program provides skills in typing, shorthand, word 
processing and general office practices. Courses in biology, 
medical terminology, microcomputers and liberal studies are 
included in the program. 

Types of Jobs: Doctors, dentists, hospitals, and various health 
occupation offices. 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_1 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
J3 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
2 
3 
1 
_3 

15 



SECOND SEMESTER 

ACC 112 Accounting I 

SEC 121 Typewriting II 

SEC 124 Shorthand II 

SEC 125 Secretarial and Administrative Procedures 

BIO 121 Basic Anatomy & Physiology 

PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



THIRD SEMESTER 

SEC 231 Typewriting III 

SEC 236 Specialized Terminology and Transcription 

MTR 101 Medical Terminology I 

WDP 121 Word Processing I 

CSC 104 Microcomputer Fundamentals 

ENL 202 Fundamentals of Speech 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

SEC 246 Secretarial Microtranscription 
SEC 247 Secretarial Office Simulation 
SEC 242 Professional Internship 
MTR 102 Medical Terminology II 
CSC Microcomputer Elective* 

Elective-Social Science/ Humanities 



*CSC 105 is not acceptable. 

Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 



® 





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r I 


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PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Secretarial Office Administration 
program is to prepare the student for employment in one of 
three secretarial fields: executive, legal, or medical. Skills 
related to each field are stressed. Courses in general secretarial 
skills are included and there is an emphasis on the use of 
microcomputers and word processors for transcription. The 
program prepares graduates to enter and advance in the 
secretarial profession. 

The graduate should be able to: 

1 . demonstrate proficiency in administrative secretarial skills. 

2. demonstrate a working knowledge of word processing 
equipment and microcomputers. 

3. apply correct terminology, use forms, and demonstrate 
skills in the area of specialization -executive, legal, or 
medical. 

4. speak and write clearly and effectively. 

5. use skills in specialized secretarial office procedures. 

6. demonstrate extensive knowledge of modern office 
equipment and office supplies. 

7. apply working knowledge of advanced duplicating and 
other copying methods, word and information processing, 
and computation skills. 

8. assess and influence behavior among supervisors, peers, 
and subordinates. 

9. apply general knowledge of the social sciences and 
understand their effect on our society. 

10. identify the need for physical fitness and positive leisure 
activities. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



SERVICE AND OPERATION OF HEAVY 
CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT (SO) 
Certificate/2 years 



This program trains students to maintain, repair and operate 
many types of construction equipment. It covers the rebuilding 
of gasoline and diesel engines; power trains; hydraulic and 
hydrostatic systems; surveying, estimating; and complete 
mechanical safety measures. 

Types of Jobs: Operation, mechanical repair, sales and service of 
heavy equipment, including work in parts department. Self-employed 
or employed by contractors, mines, quarries, farm equipment dealers, 
forestry equipment dealers and construction equipment dealers. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

SOE 713 Service and Operation I (8 weeks) 
SOE 714 Service and Operation II (8 weeks) 
MTH 710 Technical Mathematics I 



SECOND SEMESTER 

SOE 725 Service and Operation III (8 weeks) 
SOE 726 Service and Operation IV (8 weeks) 
ENL 711 Communications 



THIRD SEMESTER 

SOE 837 Service and Operation V (8 weeks) 
SOE 838 Service and Operation VI (8 weeks) 
Optional Elective 



Credits 

7 

7 

J 

17 

Credits 

7 

7 

_3 

17 

Credits 

7 

7 

0/3 

14/17 




FOURTH SEMESTER 

SOE 847 Service and Operation VII (8 weeks) 
SOE 848 Service and Operation VIII (8 weeks) 
Optional Elective 



Credits 
6 
6 

0/3 

12/15 



Co-op Options: 
Alternating 
Parallel 
Summer 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Service and Operation of Heavy 
Equipment program is to prepare students for jobs in the 
construction equipment industry. 

A graduate of Service and Operation should be able to: 

1 . practice approved safety procedures in various work 
situations. 

2. read and interpret equipment manuals and issue clear, 
legible, and complete service reports. 

3. identify and manipulate tools of the trade. 

4. describe the operation of internal combustion engines and 
demonstrate skills in troubleshooting, maintaining and 
repairing such engines. 

5. troubleshoot, maintain, and repair the complete power train 
and related components such as brake systems. 

6. demonstrate skills in oxyacetylene welding, cutting, 
brazing, and electric welding applications. 

7. distinguish the various types of hydraulic systems, power 
shift transmissions, torque converters, fuel systems, and 
heavy duty electrical systems found on construction 
equipment; maintain, troubleshoot, and repair these 
systems. 

8. demonstrate the use of transits and hand levels in 
construction layouts. 

9. perform preventive maintenance on all heavy equipment 
systems. 

10. demonstrate the use of various pieces of heavy equipment 
and use earth-moving techniques accepted by industry. 

11. use appropriate math skills to solve applied problems in 
the field of heavy equipment. 

12. identify the personal attributes required for successful 
relationships with employers, customers, and fellow 
employees. 



65 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY (ST) 
Certificate/1 year 



Surgical Technology prepares students to take the National 
Certification exam — given by the Association of Surgical 
Technologists and required for employment in this field. 
Students develop skills in operating room procedures in area 
hospitals. The program includes classroom instruction in 
anatomy, physiology and surgical technology. This 
combination of clinical training and classroom work prepares 
students to work with surgeons and nurses in hospital 
operating rooms. Students must earn a minimum grade of "C" 
in each aspect of their Surgical Technology courses. Failure to 
do so will result in termination from the program. 

Types of Jobs: Member of a surgical team in a hospital operating 
room and other related areas where surgical techniques are used. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

BIO 110 Anatomy & Physiology I 

MTR 101 Medical Terminology I 

SRT 110 Principles of Surgical Technology I 

SECOND SEMESTER 

SRT 120 Principles of Surgical Technology II 
SRT 121 Clinical Surgical Technology 
Optional Elective* 



Credits 

3 

3 

12 

18 

Credits 

4 

10 

0/3 

14/17 



*SRT 122, Department Operating Techniques is strongly 
recommended. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective is to prepare students to take the 
National Certification exam required for employment as a 
certified operating room technician. 

The Surgical Technology graduate should be able to: 

1. apply background knowledge of the basic sciences, 
surgical anatomy, and aseptic technique in surgical 
procedures. 

2. describe operating room techniques and their relation to 
patient care in order to perform tasks assigned by 
professional nursing personnel. 

3. practice good personal hygiene habits and state their effect 
in reducing infection. 

4. describe the interdepartmental relationships between the 
operating room and other hospital services. 

5. identify the need for adhering to hospital policies and 
procedures, ethics, and medical, moral, and legal codes. 

6. describe the development of a rigid surgical conscience, its 
application in the operating room and its relationship to an 
uncomplicated post-operative recovery for the patient. 

7. apply and, when necessary, modify aseptic principles when 
encountering unexpected emergency situations. 



66 



8. demonstrate knowledge and understanding of all surgical 
procedures in order to function as a member of the surgical 
team; give appropriate assistance to the surgeon and meet 
the needs of the patient. 

9. identify and describe the cost, preparation, use, care and 
after-care of equipment, instruments and supplies, and 
their importance in the safe and effective performance of 
surgical procedures. 

10. demonstrate awareness of the responsibilities and 
limitations of the role of the operating room technician and 
work within these limits. 

11. state the extent of liability of operating room technicians 
and the importance of correct, adequate, direct 
supervision. 

12. describe the organization of the hospital, its physical plant, 
and personnel requirements, practices and policies. 

13. work quickly; use operating room materials economically; 
demonstrate accuracy, speed, physical stamina and the 
ability to respond appropriately to emergency situations. 

14. demonstrate knowledge of the holistic approach to patient 




i nyp ■ MW ME ifr 




ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



TECHNICAL ILLUSTRATION (Tl) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program trains students for jobs in industry as technical 
illustrators. Students learn to convert engineering drawings 
into three dimensional illustrations used by engineers and in 
publications — parts catalogs, sales materials, repair manuals 
and others. The program includes training in drawing and 
other art skills. Courses in the humanities, mathematics and 
communications improve students' potential for advancement. 

Types of Jobs: Technical illustrator for industry, either in an 
engineering or publications department. In the engineering field you 
would produce clear, accurate pictures drawn from blueprints for 
engineers; in publications, you would produce illustrations for company 
literature; parts and sales catalogs; maintenance, repair, and assembly 
manuals, charts, and handbooks. 

Recommended High School Subjects: Two years of algebra, one 
year of science. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



EDT 


111 


EDT 


112 


ART 


111 


ENL 


111 


MTH 


103 



Basic Drafting I (8 weeks) 

Basic Drafting II (8 weeks) 

Basic Drawing 

English Composition I 

College Algebra & Trigonometry I 



SECOND SEMESTER 

EDT 121 Power Transmission (8 weeks) 
EDT 122 Mechanisms (8 weeks) 
MTH 104 College Algebra & Trigonometry II 
PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 

Elective* 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
3 
J 

17 

Credits 
4 
4 
3 
1 
_3 

15 




THIRD SEMESTER 



EDT 


108 


Manufacturing Processes 


ART 


121 


Basic Painting 


ART 


232 


Lettering and Layout 


GCO 


515 


Layout and Design 


GCO 


516 


Typographic Composition 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective* 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

ART 241 Media and Techniques 
GCO 525 Process Camera 
GCO 526 Film Assembly and Imposition 
ENL 121 English Composition II 
Elective-General* 



Electives 

Principles of Business 
Fundamentals of Speech 
American Government-National 
State and Local Government 
Western Civilization I 
Western Civilization II 
U.S. -Survey I 
Copyreading and Editing 
General Psychology 
Introduction to Sociology 
Principles of Economics 
Environmental Science 
Physical Geology 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
J 

19 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3/4 

15/16 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 



"Suggested 

MGT 110 

ENL 202 

GOV 231 

GOV 241 

HIS 111 

HIS 121 

HIS 231 

JOU 232 

PSY 111 

SOC 111 

ECO 201 

ESC 100 

GEL 105 

Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Technical Illustration program is to 
prepare students for jobs as technical illustrators in industry, or 
for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program. 

A graduate of the Technical Illustration program should be 
able to: 

1. convert engineering drawings into three-dimensional 
illustrations. 

2. letter and lay out materials using a variety of mediums — 
black and white and color — both in line and continuous 
tone (refers to use of shading or color in illustration). 

3. relate technical knowledge to the areas above in order to 
make effective decisions. 

4. follow written and verbal directions. 

5. demonstrate respect for equipment and use appropriate 
safety precautions when working around equipment. 

6. demonstrate good work habits: promptness, willingness to 
work, and receptivity to supervision. 

7. use mathematical skills for effective job performance and 
as required for the development of visualization skills and 
logical thought processes. 

8. communicate clearly, both verbally and in writing. 

9. demonstrate knowledge of a lifetime sport whi will 
provide recreation and promote physical fitness. 



67 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



TECHNOLOGY STUDIES (TS) 
Associate Degree 



Technology Studies is a flexible program — designed 
especially for, but not limited to — people currently employed 
in industry or business. Course selection is based almost 
entirely upon the goals of the individual student. As many as 
30 credits may be awarded through advanced placement, 
credit by examination, or credit for work/life experience, thus 
reducing the number of courses to be completed on campus. 
Most students will complete this program on a part-time basis; 
therefore, a number of specialized courses will be offered in a 
rotating sequence to provide increased scheduling 
opportunities. 

The minimum requirements for the Associate Degree in 
Technology Studies are: 

1. Successfully complete a minimum of 60 credit hours of 
associate degree level courses (see page 82 for definition) 
in a planned program of study. 

2. The 60 credit hours must include at least 18 credits of 
general education core courses selected from the following: 

Credits 
Communications 6 

Mathematics 6 

Natural Sciences 3/4 

Social Sciences and Humanities 3 

18/19 

3. Forty-two credits must be taken as electives. Of these, 30 
elective credits must be taken in technical career or 
vocational courses which are applicable to the Associate of 
Applied Science degree. Elective courses should be 
selected primarily on the basis of the student's vocational 
goals. The electives enable the student to select those 
vocational and/or general education courses which best 
meet his/her career, professional, and personal objectives. 

4. Students must complete a planned educational program of 
studies. This plan should be developed in conjunction with 
an advisor and be filed with the appropriate division 
director prior to the completion of the first 18 hours of 
credit. 

INDIVIDUAL CURRICULUM POSSIBILITIES 

In consultation with an advisor, students may select precisely 
those courses which best meet their needs and prepare them 
to reach their goals. Examples of groups of courses which a 
student might select in designing his/her program are shown 
below. 

Industrial Emphasis— Courses selected may include: 

Courses in specialized fields, such as Machine Tool 
Technology, Electronics, Automotive Technology (based on 
student interest and course availability) 

Industrial and Organizational Psychology 

Supervision and Human Relations 

Quality Control 

Motion and Time Study 

Specialized mathematics, such as statistics, applied calculus 

Technical Writing 



Engineering Emphasis — A student taking the Engineer in 
Training (EIT) courses (see page 80) may use completed EIT 
courses to fulfill requirements for the Technology Studies 
Degree. These courses are offered on a rotating, part-time 
basis and include: 

Statics 

Strength of Materials I 

Dynamics 

Fluid Mechanics 

Strength of Materials II 

Engineering Economics 

Engineering Chemistry 

Thermodynamics 

Engineering Physics 

Engineering Electronics 

Management and Supervision Emphasis — Courses selected 
may include: 

Principles of Business 
Business Communications 
Economics 
Accounting 

Supervision and Human Relations 
Small Business Management 
Psychology 
Business Law 
Specialized Mathematics 
Computer Science 

Specialized technical courses directed toward the student's 
vocational objectives 

EVENING PROGRAM 

Courses required for the associate degree in Technology 
Studies are also offered in the evenings for the convenience of 
students who are unable to attend classes during the day. 
Students may complete all courses required for a degree in 
Technology Studies by enrolling in evening courses on a part- 
time basis. Part-time students may require more than two 
years to complete the program. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of the Technology Studies program is to 
enable the employed person to upgrade his/her skills and 
knowledge, whether for personal or professional reasons. 

The graduate should be able to: 

1. demonstrate potential for growth and apply the skills and 
competencies acquired. 

2. formulate ideas logically and organize them into a 
productive plan to accomplish a chosen goal. 

3. demonstrate increased vocational knowledge and skills. 

4. illustrate an attitude of responsibility to self, employer, and 
community. 

5. communicate effectively in personal and job related 
activities. 

6. demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of communication 
and mathematical skills. 

7. apply general knowledge of the social and natural sciences 
and understand their effect on our environment. 



68 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



TOOL DESIGN TECHNOLOGY (TD) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



This program provides instruction in drafting, tool production 
techniques and tool drawings. It emphasizes planning and 
making drawings of special mechanical devices (dies, gages, 
cutting tools, jigs, fixtures) ranging from simple hand tools to 
complex progressive dies (a type of machine tool). The student 
is taught to write programs for production jobs on computer 
controlled machines. 

Types of Jobs: Tool, machine, and product designer; numerical 
programmer, design drafting, estimator, and systems program 
designer, processor. 

Recommended High School Subjects: Two years of algebra. 
•GENERAL ELECTIVES are courses chosen from outside your program 
of concentration. 



Credits 
3 
4 
4 
3 
3 
_^ 

18 

Credits 
4 
4 
3 
3 
_1 

15 

Credits 

4 

4 

4 

3/4 



FIRST SEMESTER 


EDT 


108 


Manufacturing Processes 


EDT 


111 


Basic Drafting I (8 weeks) 


EDT 


112 


Basic Drafting II (8 weeks) 


ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


MTH 


103 


College Algebra Et Trigonometry I 


PED 




Fitness &■ Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 



EDT 121 

EDT 122 

ENL 121 

MTH 104 
PED 



Power Transmission (8 weeks) 
Mechanisms (8 weeks) 
English Composition II 
College Algebra & Trigonometry 
Fitness it Lifetime Sports 



THIRD SEMESTER 



TDT 231 
TDT 232 

PHS 100 



Tool Drafting (8 weeks) 
Fixture Design (8 weeks) 
Physics-Mechanics 
Elective-General* 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

TDT 241 Gage Design and Programming (8 weeks) 
TDT 242 Die Design (8 weeks) 
PHS 106 Introduction to Metallurgy 
Elective-General* 



15/16 

Credits 

4 

4 

4 

3/4 

15/16 



Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of this program is to train students in the 
skills needed for jobs in tool design. 

A graduate of the Tool Design Technology program should be 
able to: 

1. describe and apply the various manufacturing methods 
related to tool design. 

2. select cutting tool materials to satisfy various metal 
removal operations. 




3. apply tolerance limits and fits to meet manufacturing 
requirements. 

4. apply calculations to determine cutting speeds and feeds 
for various metal removal applications. 

5. design jigs and fixtures to hold tools and workpieces for 
the various metal removal applications. 

6. design various kinds of gages and gaging setups to insure 
quality control. 

7. write numerical control programs. 

8. design piercing, stamping, and forming dies. 

9. apply the basic principles of physics and metallurgy to the 
tool design process. 

10. use mathematical skills to solve design problems. 

11. communicate effectively in small group and interpersonal 
situations that may occur in industry. 

12. participate as an informed citizen in a democratic society 
based on values acquired in humanities and social science 
courses. 

13. develop and use the fundamental skills provided through 
exposure to lifetime sports. 

14. demonstrate fundamental skills and knowledge in the use 
of computer aided drafting (CAD) and computer aided 
manufacturing (CAM). 

15. perform basic drawing functions on computer aided 
drafting equipment. 



69 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



WELDING (WE) 
Certificate/2 years 



This program offers practical skills training in welding and a 
background in welding theory. It emphasizes electric, 
oxyacetylene, and inert gas shielded methods of welding. 

Types of Jobs: Welder, welder operator, fitter, specialist, supervisor, 
and inspector. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



WEL 712 
MTH 710 



Acetylene Welding 
Technical Mathematics I 



SECOND SEMESTER 



WEL 722 
ENL 711 



Electric Welding 
Communications 



THIRD SEMESTER 

WEL 832 Inert Gas Welding 
EDT 107 Blueprint Reading 
Optional Elective 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

WEL 842 Welding (Advanced) 
Optional Elective 



Credits 
13 
_3 

16 

Credits 
13 
_3 

16 

Credits 

13 

2 

0/3 

15/18 

Credits 

13 

0/3 

13/16 



Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The general objective of this program is to prepare the student 
for jobs in welding. 

A graduate of the Welding program should be able to: 

1. demonstrate skills in oxyacetylene, shielded metal arc, gas 
tungsten arc, and gas metallic arc welding processes. 

2. operate welding equipment. 

3. use safe welding techniques in shop and field operations. 

4. distinguish the types of welding power sources (electric, 
gas, etc.), their characteristics, uses, and limitations. 

5. inspect welding jobs using visual, destructive, and non- 
destructive testing methods. 

6. construct weldments (objects made by welding metal) from 
sketches, blueprints or verbal instructions; understand 
welding symbols. 

7. select the proper welding process, welding procedures, 
supplies, etc., based on cost limitations. 



8. use simple shop methods for determining types of metals 
(ferrous and non-ferrous). 

9. apply knowledge of the physical and mechanical properties 
of metals, as related to weldability, during the welding 
process. 

10. duplicate welding qualification tests according to 
specifications of the American Welding Society, the 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the 
American Petroleum Institute Codes. 

11. develop positive social attitudes and good work habits. 

12. use the appropriate mathematical skills and competencies 
in solving applied problems in the field of welding. 

13. demonstrate basic skills in speech and technical writing. 




70 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



WOOD PRODUCTS TECHNOLOGY (WD) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



Wood Products Technology prepares students for mid- 
management and management positions in the wood 
processing and manufacturing industries. This program will 
also improve the management capabilities of people presently 
employed in the wood industry. The program combines 
courses in wood processing with courses in business to 
prepare students for various types of jobs. Students gain 
practical experience at the College's sawmill and through a co- 
op or internship experience. 

Types of Jobs: Lumber inspector, dry kiln operator, sawyer, trimmer, 
edger, lumber yard supervisor, quality control technician, log and 
lumber buyer or seller, wood products sales, mill manager, planer mill 
manager, equipment sales. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



WPT 


111 


FOR 


111 


FOR 


113 


MTH 


500 


ENL 


111 


PED 





Wood Properties and Utilization 
Dendrology (Tree it Shrub Identification) 
Forest Mensuration 
Technical Mathematics II 
English Composition I 
Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 



WPT 


121 


Lumber and Log Grading 


WPT 


122 


Sawmilling I 


WPT 


123 


Lumber Drying 


MGT 


110 


Principles of Business 


ENL 


201 


Technical Writing 


PED 




Fitness &• Lifetime Sports 



THIRD SEMESTER 

WPT 231 Wood Industry Co-op/Internship 

WPT 232 Sawmilling II 

FOR 242 Forest Products 

ACC 112 Accounting I 

MKT 240 Marketing 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

WPT 233 Quality Control 
WPT 243 Production Management 
WPT 244 Equipment and Machinery 
MGT 248 Supervision and Human Relations 
Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_1 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 

15 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
J 

15 



Co-op Options: 
Parallel 
Summer 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The objective of Wood Products Technology is to prepare 
students for employment in the wood industry and related 
businesses and to improve the management capabilities of 
those presently employed in this industry. 

A graduate should be able to: 

1. identify the important commercial wood species and relate 
their characteristics to their potential uses. 

2. identify selected species of trees and shrubs by their 
scientific and common names, general uses, site 
characteristics and geographic distribution. 

3. describe the processes involved in converting logs into 
various wood products. 

4. grade hardwood and softwood logs and lumber based on 
industry standards. 

5. make recommendations concerning replacement, addition, 
and upgrading of machinery and personnel. 

6. describe the process of finding markets, methods of 
merchandising, distribution from manufacturer to 
consumer, and mark-up procedures. 

7. evaluate the quality of wood products at various stages of 
manufacturing. 

8. apply skills in buying logs, processing wood, or marketing 
wood products. 

9. demonstrate familiarity with the types, operation, and basic 
maintenance of the more important machines used in wood 
processing. 

10. demonstrate familiarity with the principles of cutting lumber 
to obtain the best grade. 

11. demonstrate basic skills in maintaining sawmills. 

12. demonstrate basic skills in handling, stacking, and kiln and 
air drying of lumber. 

13. apply knowledge of business organization and skills — 
planning, economics, financing, business law, worker's 
compensation, overhead determination, and profit and loss 
statements. 

14. demonstrate leadership techniques and skills in 
interpersonal relationships needed to supervise others. 

15. understand the basic concepts, techniques, procedures, 
and principles of accounting and bookkeeping. 

16. write accurate, grammatically correct technical reports and 
demonstrate skill in verbal communication. 

17. solve basic problems in arithmetic, algebra and 
trigonometry and apply math skills in solving practical 
problems related to the wood products industry. 

18. demonstrate fundamental skills in lifetime sports. 



71 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 



WORD PROCESSING (WP) 
Associate Degree/2 years 



FIRST SEMESTER 


CSC 


118 


Fundamentals of Computer Science 


ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


MGT 


110 


Principles of Business 


MGT 


230 


Business Communications 


SEC 


111 


Typewriting I 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



SECOND SEMESTER 



Students acquire a background in business and learn the 
specialized skills used in word processing operations. 
Graduates are qualified for jobs as word processing equipment 
operators and as first-line supervisors in word processing 
centers. 

Types of Jobs: Word processing equipment operator and word 
processing center supervisor. 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_1 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_1 
16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
J3 
15 



CSC 
ENL 

MGT 111 
SEC 121 
WDP 121 
PED 



Computer Science Elective 
English Elective 
Business Mathematics 
Typewriting II 
Word Processing I 
Fitness & Lifetime Sports 



THIRD SEMESTER 



ACC 112 
WDP 231 
WDP 232 



Accounting I 

Machine Transcription and Office Procedures 

Word Processing II 

Business/Computer Science Elective 

Elective 



FOURTH SEMESTER 



MGT 
WDP 
WDP 



248 
241 
242 



Supervision and Human Relations 

Word Processing III 

Word Processing Internship* 

Elective 

Social Science/ Humanities Elective 



*A cooperative education experience may be substituted for Word 
Processing Internship. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The primary objective of the Word Processing program is to 
prepare students for positions as word processing operators 
and first-line supervisors of word processing centers. 

The graduate should be able to: 

1 . operate various types of word processing equipment. 

2. select the best machine and methods to handle a given 
word processing task. 

3. communicate effectively in writing. 




4. edit materials, applying the rules of business writing, 
grammar, punctuation and transcription. 

5. produce final copy from various forms of input: 
handwritten copy, machine dictation, etc. 

6. demonstrate extensive knowledge and skill in using 
transcription equipment. 

7. operate various types of advanced word processing printing 
devices. 

8. handle communications between an information processor 
and a document printer. 

9. design and prepare an effective procedures manual. 

10. manage work flow by prioritizing work. 

11. understand the role of management in word processing: 
personnel selection, training, and motivation. 

12. demonstrate extensive knowledge of modern office 
equipment and office supplies. 

13. demonstrate ability to reason logically, to analyze, and to 
evaluate information and to apply these processes to word 
processing problems. 

14. relate in a positive manner to supervisors, peers and 
subordinates. 

15. apply general knowledge of the social sciences. 

16. identify the need for physical fitness and positive leisure 
activities. 



72 



COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY TRANSFER PROGRAMS 



General Studies 

This program offers the equivalent of the first two years in a 
four-year Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science program. 
The program is flexible — students select courses based on 
the requirements of the four-year college to which they plan to 
transfer. (We recommend that students identify the college to 
which they plan to transfer as soon as possible.) A faculty 
advisor works with each student to design a program that best 
meets the student's future plans. Cooperative education 
options are available to students in General Studies. 

OBJECTIVES 

Upon completion of the General Studies Program the student 
will: 

1. have general knowledge in each of the following areas: 
Communications, Mathematics and/or Statistics, 
Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, and the 
development and maintenance of good health. 

2. have comprehensive knowledge in one or more of the 
following areas: Communications, Mathematics and/or 
Statistics, Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences. 

3. have the academic background needed to transfer into 
related baccalaureate degree programs. 

4. demonstrate the ability to reason logically, to analyze, 
synthesize, and evaluate information, and to apply 
mathematical reasoning processes and/ or the scientific 
method. 

5. have an open mind and the willingness to modify 
performance or attitudes when faced with sufficient reason 
to do so. 

6. produce work that demonstrates the ability to integrate 
various academic and practical experiences. 

7. display an awareness of our cultural traditions and a 
sensitivity toward the traditions of other cultures. 

8. display acceptable social values and attitudes in day-to-day 
activity, including productive citizenship and responsibility 
toward self and others. 

9. experience greater joy in living because of an increased 
awareness of the social, cultural, and natural environments. 




GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

1. Successfully complete the College's graduation 
requirements for all Associate Degree Programs. (See pg. 
125.) 

2. Successfully complete a minimum of 60 credits of 
Associate Degree level course work (courses numbered 100 
- 299) selected from the General Education Core areas (as 
defined below) plus four credits in health and fitness and 
lifetime sports. 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE 

Communications 

English 

Languages 

Speech 

Quantitative Concepts & Skills 

Mathematics 
Statistics 

Humanities 

Philosophy 

History 

Government 

Social Sciences 

Economics 
Psychology 
Sociology 

Natural Sciences 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Environmental Science 

Geology 

Geography 

Appropriate associate degree courses in other subject areas 
may be substituted for the General Education Core courses 
with the prior written approval of the student's advisor and 
Division Director. 

3. Successfully complete 25/26 credits of Associate Degree 
level General Education Core courses which must include: 



Communications 


6 credits 


Quantitative Concepts and Skills 


6 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Natural Science (to include at least 




3 hours of laboratory) 


7-8 credits 



. Successfully complete 2 credits in health and 2 credits in 
fitness and lifetime sports OR 4 credits in fitness and 
lifetime sports. Part-time students may be exempt from this 
requirement. 

. Complete all placement testing required by the College. 
Students must demonstrate basic mastery of English, 
reading, and mathematics through placement testing or 
through successful completion of appropriate courses 
(Developmental Studies courses) designed to provide basic 
skills and competencies in these areas. 



73 



COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY TRANSFER PROGRAMS 



The General Studies Program Curriculum (GS) 

To meet their individual needs, students may schedule courses 
other than those listed below (upon the recommendation of 
the student's academic advisor and approval by the 
appropriate Division Director). It is strongly recommended that 
as early as possible the student review the requirements of the 
particular program and the institution he/she plans to attend 
upon completing the General Studies program. Elective credits 
can then be selected to meet these requirements. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


MTH 


101 


Introduction to Mathematics I 


MTH 


103 


College Algebra & Trigonometry I 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-Humanities 
Elective-Natural Science* 
Elective-General Core 



Credits 
3 



1 

3 

3-4 

3 







16-17 


SECOND SEMESTER 








Credits 


ENL 121 


English Composition II 


3 


MTH 102 


Introduction to Mathematics II 






or 


3 


MTH 104 


College Algebra & Trigonometry II 




PED 


Fitness Er Lifetime Sports 


1 




Elective-Social Science 


3 




Elective-Natural Science* 


3-4 




Elective-General Core 


3 



THIRD SEMESTER 

"An elective program based on the student's major 
educational and vocational interests. Completion of 
Fitness & Lifetime Sports requirement. 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

"An elective program based on the student's major 
educational and vocational interests. 



16-17 



Credits 



16-18 Credits 



Credits 



16-18 Credits 



*To include at least one course with a three-hour laboratory. 

'Elective credits may come from any 100 or 200 level associate degree 
courses offered by the College. We recommend that most of these 
credits be taken in the General Education Core discipline areas, 
especially if students plan to transfer to four-year degree programs. 

Courses in other subject areas must be approved by the student's 
advisor and Division Director. 



Curriculum Guides 

Students who plan professional or semi-professional 
preparation in the arts and sciences may begin their 
undergraduate studies at The Williamsport Area Community 
College. Students who plan to transfer to four-year institutions 
to complete the requirements for the baccalaureate degree 
should schedule courses that meet the requirements of the 
institution to which they plan to transfer. The students' 
success in transferring to a particular college will largely 



depend on the quality of academic achievement at The 
Williamsport Area Community College. 

Curriculum guides for professional careers requiring education 
beyond an associate degree are shown below. 

1. Business Administration Emphasis 

2. Communications Emphasis 

3. Education Emphasis 

4. Math-Science Emphasis 

5. Pre-Law Emphasis 

6. Pre-Medical Emphasis 

7. Pre-Theological Emphasis 

The curriculum guides which follow are recommended (not 
required) programs. 

Business Administration Emphasis 

This program is designed for students who plan to transfer to 
a four-year college or university to earn a baccalaureate degree 
in Business Administration. Career possibilities for students 
who complete a four-year program include accounting, 
economics, finance, foreign commerce, economic geography, 
industrial management, personnel management, insurance, 
marketing, and real estate. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


MTH 


103 


College Algebra & Trigonometry I 


HIS 


111 


Western Civilization I 


HIS 


231 


United States-Survey I 


MGT 


110 


Principles of Business 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-General Core 



SECOND SEMESTER 



ENL 121 



English Composition II 
or 



ENL 


201 


Technical Writing 


MTH 


201 


Elementary Statistics 


HIS 


121 


Western Civilization II 


HIS 


241 


United States-Survey II 


ECO 


201 


Principles of Economics 


PED 




Fitness Et Lifetime Sports 
Elective-General Core 



THIRD SEMESTER 

ENL 202 Fundamentals of Speech 
ACC 112 Accounting I 
MGT 231 Business Law I 
PSY 111 General Psychology 
PED Fitness &■ Lifetime Sports 

Elective-Natural Science 



Credits 
3 
3 



3 

1 
_3 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 

3 

1 
J 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3-4 

16-17 



74 



COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY TRANSFER PROGRAMS 



FOURTH SEMESTER 









Credits 


ACC 


122 


Accounting II 


3 


MGT 


241 


Business Law II 


3 


CSC 


118 


Fundamentals of Computer Science 


3 


PED 




Fitness £f Lifetime Sports 


1 






Elective-General Core 


3 






Elective-Natural Science 


3-4 



16-17 



Communications Emphasis 

The program is designed for students planning careers in the 
field of communications. Career possibilities include: 
advertising, broadcasting, freelance writing, journalism and 
public relations. The intent of this program is not to prepare 
students for immediate employment upon graduation. It offers 
students opportunities to explore various careers in mass 
communications while completing course work designed to 
transfer to a four-year college or university. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


JOU 


111 


News Writing 


JOU 


114 


Mass Media Photography 


MCM 


111 


Introduction to Mass Communications 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Math elective' 



SECOND SEMESTER 



ENL 


121 


English Composition II 


MCM 


122 


Media and the Law 


PSY 


111 


General Psychology 


HIS 


111 


Western Civilization I 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Math elective* 



THIRD SEMESTER 



ENL 


235 


Creative Writing 


JOU 


231 


Feature Writing 


BRC 


233 


Broadcast Writing 


SOC 


111 


Introduction to Sociology 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-General Core 
Elective-Natural Science 



FOURTH SEMESTER 



ENL 


201 


Technical Writing 


ENL 


202 


Fundamentals of Speech 


MCM 


243 


Public Relations 


ADV 


101 


Principles of Advertising 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-General Core 
Elective-Natural Science 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
J 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
J 

16 

Credits 
3 



3 

1 

3 

3/4 

16/17 



Credits 
3 
3 



1 
3 

3/4 

16/17 



'Mathematics Electives: 
MTH 101/102 or MTH 103/104 sequence 



Education Emphasis 

The Education Emphasis is modeled on the first two.years of a 
four-year professional education curriculum. Students have the 
opportunity to complete much of their general academic 
course work and to become familiar with education as a 
career. Students who enroll in this program usually go on to 
earn a baccalaureate degree. Graduates who choose not to 
continue their education may find jobs as teachers' aides, 
classroom assistants or in other paraprofessional areas. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


EDU 


111 


Introduction to Education 


PSY 


111 


General Psychology 


MTH 


101 


Introduction to Mathematics I 


MTH 


103 


College Algebra & Trigonometry I 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-General Core 



SECOND SEMESTER 

ENL 121 English Composition II 
ECO 201 Principles of Economics 
MTH 102 Introduction to Mathematics II 

or 
MTH 104 College Algebra & Trigonometry II 
PED Fitness 8- Lifetime Sports 

Elective-General Core 



THIRD SEMESTER 



MTH 


201 


Elementary Statistics 


EDU 


121 


Children's Et Young Adult Literature 


HIS 


111 


Western Civilization I 


PED 




Fitness &■ Lifetime Sports 
Elective-General Core 
Elective-Natural Science 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

ENL 202 Fundamentals of Speech 
PSY 231 Educational Psychology 
HIS 121 Western Civilization II 
PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 

Elective-General Core 
Elective-Natural Science 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 



1 
J 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 



1 
_6 

16 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3-4 

16-17 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
1 

3 
3-4 

16-17 



© 



COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY TRANSFER PROGRAMS 



Math-Science Emphasis 

Students with a strong background in mathematics and 
science will find many opportunities in such fields as 
education, engineering, research, actuarial science, time-study 
analysis, and economics. They may also find careers as 
mathematical or scientific technicians in business, industry, 
and government. 

FIRST SEMESTER 









Credits 


ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


3 


MTH 


103 


College Algebra & Trigonometry I 








or 


3-4 


MTH 


238 


Calculus I 




HIS 


111 


Western Civilization I 








or 


3 


HIS 


231 


United States-Survey I 

Laboratory Science (Biology, Chemistry, 








Physics, or Geologyl 


4 


ECO 


201 


Principles of Economics 


3 


PED 




Fitness & Lifetime Sports 


1 



SECOND SEMESTER 



ENL 
MTH 


121 
104 


English Composition II 

College Algebra & Trigonometry II 


MTH 
HIS 


248 

121 


Calculus II 

Western Civilization II 



17-18 

Credits 
3 



HIS 241 



PED 



United States-Survey II 

Laboratory Science (Biology, Chemistry, 

Physics, or Geology) 
Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-General Core 



3-4 



THIRD SEMESTER 



MTH 201 



PED 



Literature or Sociology 

Elementary Statistics 

Laboratory Science (Biology, Chemistry, 

Physics, or Geology) 
Computer Science 
Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-General Core 



FOURTH SEMESTER 



MTH 204 



PED 



Literature or Sociology 

Matrix Algebra 

Laboratory Science (Biology, Chemistry, 

Physics, or Geology) 
Computer Science 
Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-General Core 



17-18 

Credits 
3 
3 

4 

3 

1 

_3 

17 

Credits 
3 

3 

4 

3 

1 

_3 

17 



Pre-Law Emphasis 

The student who plans to enter law school should develop a 
program which includes a broad base of liberal studies. The 
Association of American Law Schools recommends that 
programs emphasize the following: 

1. Comprehension and expression in words 

2. Critical understanding of human institutions and values 

3. Creative power in thinking 



(S) 



The program below is based on these recommendations. 
Modifications in this program should be planned in conjunction 
with the pre-law advisor. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



ENL 


111 


English Composition I 


MTH 


103 


College Algebra £f Trigonometry I 


MTH 


238 


Calculus I 


HIS 


111 


Western Civilization I 


PSY 


111 


General Psychology 


PED 




Fitness £t Lifetime Sports 
Elective-General Core 



SECOND SEMESTER 



ENL 


121 


English Composition II 


MTH 


104 


College Algebra & Trigonometry II 


MTH 


248 


Calculus II 


HIS 


121 


Western Civilization II 


SOC 


111 


Introduction to Sociology 


PED 




Fitness £t Lifetime Sports 
Elective-General Core 



THIRD SEMESTER 



ENL 


202 


ACC 


112 


PHL 


111 


GOV 


231 


PED 





Fundamentals of Speech 
Principles of Accounting I 
Introduction to Philosophical Analysis 
American Government-National 
Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-Natural Science 



FOURTH SEMESTER 



ECO 


201 


ACC 


122 


PHL 


121 


GOV 


241 


PED 





Principles of Economics 
Principles of Accounting II 
Ethics and Political Analysis 
State and Local Government 
Fitness & Lifetime Sports 
Elective-Natural Science 



Credits 
3 

3-4 

3 

3 

1 

3 

16-17 

Credits 
3 

3-4 

3 
3 

1 
3 

16-17 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3-4 

16-17 

Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3-4 

16-17 



Pre-Medical Emphasis 

The Pre-Medical Emphasis offers preparation for careers in 
medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, optometry, veterinary 
medicine, chiropractic, other health professions, and scientific 
research. The program also meets the needs of students 
interested in fields like chemistry, physics and biology. 
Because of the rigorous and time-consuming nature of the 
medical programs — which include much training in clinical 
laboratories and patient-related experiences — students should 
have aptitudes in mathematics and science. Laboratory 
experience and manual dexterity are also important. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



ENL 
MTH 


111 
103 


English Composition I 

College Algebra & Trigonometry I 


MTH 
HIS 


238 

111 


Calculus I 

Western Civilization I 


HIS 
BIO 

CHM 


231 
113 
111 


United States-Survey I 
General Biology I 
General Chemistry I 



Credits 
3 

3-4 



4 
4 

17-18 



COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY TRANSFER PROGRAMS 



SECOND SEMESTER 



ENL 


121 


English Composition II 


MTH 


104 


College Algebra Et Trigonometry II 


MTH 


248 


Calculus II 


PSY 


111 


General Psychology 


BIO 


123 


General Biology II 


CHM 


121 


General Chemistry II 


PED 




Fitness £t Lifetime Sports 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Literature or Sociology 
PHS 116 General Physics I 
BIO 115 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 
PED Fitness & Lifetime Sports 

Elective-General Core 

FOURTH SEMESTER 

Literature or Sociology 
PHS 126 General Physics II 
BIO 125 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 
BIO 201 Microbiology 
PED 201 Personal £t Community Health 



Credits 
3 

3-4 

3 
4 
4 
1 

18-19 

Credits 
3 
4 
4 
1 
3-6 

15-18 

Credits 
3 
4 
4 
4 
_2 

17 



Pre-Theological Emphasis 

This program is designed for students planning careers in 
religious education, the missionary field, or the ministry. It is 
based on recommendations set forth by the Association of 
Theological Schools. They advise that students acquire a 
background in the liberal arts, complemented by a major in 
either the humanities or the social sciences. Following 
graduation, students should plan to complete their education 
at a four-year college or university. 

FIRST SEMESTER 



ENL 111 


English Composition 1 


Credits 
3 


MTH 101 


Introduction to Mathematics 1 


3 


MTH 103 


or 

College Algebra & Trigonometry 1 


PSY 1 1 1 


General Psychology 


3 


HIS 111 


Western Civilization 1 


3 


PED 


Fitness &• Lifetime Sports 


1 




Elective-General Core 


3 


SECOND SEMESTER 


16 






Credits 


ENL 121 


English Composition II 


3 


MTH 102 


Introduction to Mathematics II 






or 


3 


MTH 104 


College Algebra Et Trigonometry II 




SOC 111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 


HIS 111 


Western Civilization II 


3 


PED 


Fitness & Lifetime Sports 


1 




Elective-General Core 


_3 


THIRD SEMESTER 


16 






Credits 


ENL 202 


Fundamentals of Speech 


3 


PHL 111 


Introduction to Philosophical Analysis 


3 


SOC 231 


Marriage and the Family 


3 


PED 


Fitness it Lifetime Sports 


1 




Elective-Social Science 


3 




Elective-Natural Science 


3-4 



16-17 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

ECO 201 Principles of Economics 
PHL 121 Ethics and Political Philosophy 
PSY 203 Developmental Psychology 
PED Fitness Et Lifetime Sports 

Elective-Social Science 
Elective-Natural Science 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3-4 

16-17 



INDIVIDUAL STUDIES PROGRAM 

Individual Studies is the most flexible program offered by the 
College. It is designed for the student who wants to explore a 
number of careers — people interested in personal enrichment 

— someone who wants to prepare for a very specialized career 

— anyone whose educational goals are not met by the 
College's other programs. Cooperative education options are 
available to students enrolled in Individual Studies. 

OBJECTIVES 

Upon completion of the Individual Studies Program the 
student will have developed one or more of the following: 

1. awareness of his/her academic and manual abilities and 
careers in which they can be applied. 

2. extensive knowledge of one or more subjects. 

3. technical skills in one or more areas and general knowledge 
in desired academic subjects. 

4. entry-level job skills in a paraprofessional or technical field. 

5. completion of courses required for the four-year program 
into which he/she intends to transfer. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 
1, 



(See pg. 



6 credits 
3 credits 

3-4 credits 



Successfully complete the College's graduation 
requirements for all Associate Degree Programs. 
125.) 

. Successfully complete a minimum of sixty (60) credits of 
Associate Degree level course work: 

a. The 60 credit hours must include 12 credits of General 
Education Core courses (see page 75 for a list of 
General Education Core course subjects) as specified 
below: 

Communications 
Mathematics or Statistics 
Humanities OR Social Sciences OR 
Natural Sciences 

b. Full-time students must complete four additional credits 
of Fitness &■ Lifetime Sports, bringing the total number 
of required credits to 64; part-time students may be 
exempted from this requirement. 

. Complete all placement testing required by the College. 
Students must demonstrate basic mastery of English, 
reading, and mathematics through placement testing or 
through successful completion of appropriate courses 
(Developmental Studies courses) designed to provide basic 
skills and competencies in these areas. 

. The student must complete a planned educational program 
of studies. 

This plan should be developed by the student and his or her 
advisor and be filed with the appropriate Division Director 
prior to the completion of eighteen (18) semester hours of 
credit. 



77 



...TRANSFER PROGRAMS 



CURRICULUM POSSIBILITIES 

Students in Individual Studies select courses based almost 
entirely on their goals. Advisors work with students in 
designing programs and selecting the courses which will best 
meet their needs. It may take longer than two years to 
complete courses desired because of scheduling conflicts. This 
is particularly true for students who schedule laboratory or 
shop courses which require large blocks of time. 

AN EXAMPLE OF A PLANNED INDIVIDUAL STUDIES 
PROGRAM 

A person may wish to enroll in the Individual Studies program 
to prepare for a particular occupational specialty. For example, 
someone who enjoys flower arranging and cooking might want 
to prepare to own and run a catering business. Courses could 
be selected from Food and Hospitality Management, 
Floriculture, Business, and related areas. One possible 
selection of 64 credits of course work follows: 

Food and Hospitality Management 

Quantity Food Preparation 

Menu Planning &• Cost Control 

Purchasing, Storage & Sanitation 

Hospitality Merchandising 

Equipment &• Layouts 

Personnel Management, Work Simplification 

Floriculture 

Floral Design I 
Floral Design II 
Flower Shop Operation 

Business 

Principles of Business 

Business Communications 

Accounting I 

Accounting II 

Small Business Management 

Business Mathematics 

Related 

Introduction to Mathematics I 
English Composition I 
English Composition II 
Fundamentals of Chemistry 
Fitness Et Lifetime Sports 

Another student with this same career goal might choose to 
emphasize another area depending on interest and prior 
experience. For example, someone who had prepared food for 
many large parties in their own home might feel quite 
competent in the food aree and wish to emphasize business 
courses. The exact combination of courses in the individual 
studies program is decided entirely by the individual, with the 
help of an advisor. 



EXAM PREPARATION 



Engineer In Training (EIT) 
Exam Preparation 

The Engineer In Training (EIT) courses prepare students to 
take the EIT examination. The EIT exam is one of the 
requirements for becoming a registered professional engineer 
in the State of Pennsylvania. These courses are open to 
anyone who wants to prepare for the examination. Courses 
offered are: 



Course Title 

STATICS 

STRENGTH OF MATERIALS I 

DYNAMICS 

FLUID MECHANICS 

STRENGTH OF MATERIALS II 

ENGINEERING ECONOMICS 

ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY 

THERMODYNAMICS 

ENGINEERING PHYSICS 

ENGINEERING ELECTRONICS 



Course 



Number 

EIT 201 
EIT 202 
EIT 203 
EIT 204 
EIT 205 
EIT 206 
EIT 207 
EIT 208 
EIT 209 
EIT 210 



The Engineer In Training courses may also be used to meet 
requirements for the Technology Studies degree (see page 70 for more 
information on Technology Studies). 



Real Estate 

All real estate courses offered by the Business and Computer 
Technologies Division are listed below. The list also shows the 
courses which can be applied to the State Real Estate 
Commission's requirements for a salesperson's license or a 
broker's license. 



Broker 









License for 




Course Title 


Course No. 


Cr. 


Salesperson 


B 


Real Estate Fundamentals 


RES 112 


3 


X 


X 


Real Estate Law 


RES 113 


3 




X 


Real Estate Appraisal 


RES 114 


3 




X 


Real Estate Practice 


RES 115 


3 


X 


X 


Real Estate Financing 


RES 116 


3 




X 


Real Estate Management 


RES 117 


3 




X 


Real Estate Principles 


RES 212 


3 




X 


Real Estate Math 


RES 119 


3 




X 


Real Estate Taxes 


RES 120 


3 




X 



All prospective real estate salespersons are required to take 
two (2) standardized real estate courses to qualify for the 
salesperson's examination. These courses are "Real Estate 
Fundamentals" and "Real Estate Practice". 

To qualify to take the test for a broker's license students need 
16 credits in real estate. 



78 



COURSES 




COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Courses are listed alphabetically under the name of the 
subject- Accounting, Advertising, Advertising Art, 
Agribusiness, Architectural Technology, Automotive, Aviation, 
Biology, etc. 

The letters and numbers preceding the names of the courses 
are an identification code for recording purposes. Courses are 
designated by numbers as follows: 

Courses 
Numbered Description 

001 - 099 Developmental courses which may be required 

of students on the basis of placement tests. 
The College awards institutional credit for these 
courses. This credit will appear on the student's 
transcript and count in the Cumulative Grade 
Point Average. However, credits earned in 
courses numbered 001-099 may not replace any 
courses or electives required in a given 
program. 

100 - 301 College-level courses applicable to Associate 

Degree and Certificate programs. 

500 - 699 Courses are applicable to Associate Degree and 

Certificate programs, with the exception of the 
General Studies program. 

700 - 899 Courses applicable to Certificate programs. 

Credits 

The number given after the course description shows the 
number of credits awarded for the course. The first number in 
parentheses shows the number of lecture hours per week. The 
second number, which appears after the dash, shows the 
number of laboratory or shop hours per week. 



® 



Prerequisite and Corequisite Courses 

Prerequisite and corequisite courses are listed in italics at the 
end of the course description. Prerequisites are courses which 
must be completed before the student enrolls in the course for 
which they are listed as prerequisites. Corequisites are courses 
which the student must take prior to or at the same time as 
the course for which they are listed as corequisites. 



SPECIAL TOPICS COURSES: (1-5 credits) 

Any course with the number "299" (for example BCS 299) is a 
Special Topics Course. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

Special attention to particular abilities, interests of students, 
and particular topics. Individual guidance in advanced studies. 
Admission by permission of the instructor, Division Director, 
and Dean of Academic Affairs. 




ACCOUNTING (ACC) 



ACC112 
ACCOUNTING I 

Introduction to elementary accounting principles. Includes the pro- 
cedures, terms, theories, and practical applications of proprietorship ac- 
counting. Develops the foundation of accounting principles necessary for 
success in advanced courses and helps prepare the student for employ- 
ment in business. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

ACC 122 
ACCOUNTING II 

Continues the development of accounting principles as applied to the dif- 
ferent forms of business organization. Emphasizes corporate and partner- 
ship accounting. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: ACC 1 1 2 or Division permission. 

ACC 125 

INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING 

Familiarizes students with the different rules and regulations regarding 
Federal and Pennsylvania state income taxes. Tax deductions, credits, 
exemptions, rates, computation of all types of taxes, and the various 
forms students should be familiar with are stressed. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

ACC 230 

MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 

Presents the analytic skills needed to make decisions based on financial 
information. Emphasizes the organization of data for decisions, develop- 
ment of sound measurements, and the use of accounting for control and 
evaluation of economic activity. De-emphasizes the use of financial ac- 
counting using the transaction recording process. Course assumes the 
student has a thorough knowledge of accounting principles and is 
prepared to analyze the financial summarizations. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: 
ACC 122 or Division permission. 



ACC 231 

COST ACCOUNTING 

Includes transactions of a manufacturing business, finding unit costs, fin- 
ding total cost after processing, and profit through distribution. Three 
types of cost accounting systems will be discussed in detail: Job Cost, 
Process Cost, and Standard Cost. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: ACC 122 or 
Division permission. 

ACC 232 

INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I 

Detailed in-depth study of financial statements and the fundamental ac- 
counting processes. Includes an examination of working capital. 
3Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: ACC 122 or Division permission. 

ACC 244 

INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II 

Deals with noncurrent assets, liabilities, stockholders' equity, and various 
analytical accounting processes. Includes an in-depth study of funds 
statement. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: ACC 232 or Division permission. 

ACC 246 
AUDITING 

Offers a thorough knowledge of auditing through the application of prin- 
ciples and stresses adherence to auditing standards. Internal controls, the 
field of auditing and public accounting, audit techniques, audit work 
papers, verification of accounts, reporting the audit and internal auditing 
are discussed. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisites: ACC 1 12, ACC 122. 



ADVERTISING (ADV) 



ADV 101 

PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING 

Survey of the history of American advertising and advertising in relation 
to the economy. Organization and management of advertising; its place 
in total marketing as well as retail and national advertising; sociological 
aspects; creative production. 3 Cr. (3-0). 



ADVERTISING ART (ART) 



ART 111 

BASIC DRAWING 

The basics of observing and perceiving objects in space. Drawing objects 
in various ways using a variety of techniques. 3 Cr. (1-6). 

ART 121 

BASIC PAINTING 

An introduction to painting. Emphasizes color, value, form, texture. Em- 
phasizes representational painting but experimentation is encouraged. 3 
Cr. ( 1 -6) . Prerequisites: ART 111, ART 231 or permission of the instructor. 

ART 231 

COLOR AND DESIGN 

Introduction to two dimensional design and color. Studies from nature — 
and the properties of color, shape, form and space — lead to the 
discovery of individual solutions to problems in two dimensional design. 3 
Cr. (1-6). 

ART 232 

LETTERING AND LAYOUT 

A study of the elements and design of layouts for advertising art. The 
history, anatomy and design of letters. Emphasizes the proper use of let- 
tering in advertising. 3 Cr. (1-6). 



80' 



ART 233 
INTRODUCTION TO ART 

A basic course. Emphasizes the study and understanding of the visual 
forms of art, painting, sculpture and architecture. Includes functions of 
design, techniques of execution, and basic principles concerning the 
visual arts. Also covers the study of major periods of art: Egyptian, 
Greco-Roman, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque, nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

ART 241 

MEDIA AND TECHNIQUES 

Lecture and demonstrations are used to present the various media and 
techniques used in advertising art, including gouache, watercolor, wash, 
pastel, pen and ink, scratchboard, airbrush and art aids. 3 Cr. (1-6). Prere- 
quisite: Permission of instructor. 

ART 242 
ADVERTISING DESIGN 

Projects in poster design, brochures, illustration and other forms of 
advertising and editorial media. Includes basic techniques and processes 
used in preparation of advertising and graphic art for the printer. The 
following skills are involved: illustration, paste-up, specifying type, 
overlays, lettering, and layout. 3 Cr. (1-6). Prerequisite: ART 232, Permis- 
sion of instructor. 



AGRIBUSINESS (AGB) 



AGB 111 

INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS 

An overview of the broad field of agribusiness and specialized aspects of 
the field. Field trips to different types of agribusinesses and farms give 
students a first-hand view of the industry to help them clarify their career 
goals. In addition, the student will develop a planned agribusiness 
internship/co-op experience. 4 Cr. (3-3). 

AGB 112 

SOILS, FERTILIZER, AND AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS 

The formation of and the physical and biological properties of soil. Em- 
phasizes soil conditions that affect crop production. Composition of fer- 
tilizer, its manufacture and use. Includes soil sampling, test report 
analysis, plant deficiencies, and the reactions of nutrients within plants. 
Types of chemicals and how to use and apply them properly. 4 Cr. (3-3). 

AGB 123 

FIELD AND FORAGE CROP PRODUCTION 

A study of basic principles related to the culture and production of grain 
crops and forage. 3 Cr. (2-3) . 

AGB 124 

AGRICULTURAL FINANCING 

The principles of financing as applied to agribusiness. A look at the many 
sources of credit — private and governmental. Obtaining credit and its 
use.3Cr. (3-0). 

AGB 125 

DAIRY PRODUCTION 

The feeding, management, breeding, milking, disease control, and hous- 
ing of dairy canle. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

AGB 236 

ANIMAL PRODUCTION 

The basic practical aspects of managing livestock production. Includes 
beef, swine, sheep, and poultry. 4 Cr. (3-3). 

AGB 237 

SPECIAL TOPICS IN AGRIBUSINESS 

Investigation and study — individually and by the class — in special 
topics related to the objectives of the Agribusiness program. Examples of 
topics: Conservation, Horticulture, and Forestry. 3 Cr. (2-3). 



AGB 240 
INTERNSHIP/CO-OP 

Practical experience in a planned, supervised program of work with an 
agricultural business or farming enterprise. 3 Cr. 200 Hrs. 

AGB 248 

FARM MANAGEMENT 

The fundamental principles of management and economics with the 
emphasis on farm applications. Farm records, their analysis and use in 
determining progress and farm planning. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

AGB 249 

AGRICULTURAL SALES AND SERVICE 

An introduction to the factors involved in marketing. Includes the 
psychology of selling, pricing, and presenting the product. Supply and 
demand, new concepts in marketing, the relationship of customer service 
to growth. 3 Cr. (3-0). 



AIR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION (ACR) 



ACR231 

THEORY AND OPERATION OF AIR CONDITIONING AND 

HEATING SYSTEMS 

Advanced course in the design of all air systems, air and water systems, 
all water systems, central and room air conditioners and heat pumps. 
Schematic drawings of these systems, operating conditions, pressure, 
temperature, etc. Instruction in the sizing of duct and correct duct design 
(as recommended by ASHRA). 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisites: ACR 52 1, ACR 
522. 

ACR 232 

INSTALLATION AND SERVICE PROBLEMS-AIR CONDITIONING 

Correct methods of installing air conditioning equipment; duct design and 
sizing to assure proper air flow; installation of duct systems. Electrical and 
electrical component failure, including refrigeration breakdowns. 5 Cr. 
(3-6). Prerequisites: ACR 521, ACR 522. Corequisite: ACR231. 

ACR 241 

AIR MOVEMENT AND VENTILATION 

Identification and normal applications of various types of air conditioning 
equipment. Methods used to take apart and reassemble evaporative 
coolers; exhaust fans; insulation as a thermal blanket and as soundproof- 
ing. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisite: PHS 500. 

ACR 242 

SOLAR HEAT/ENERGY CONSERVATION 

Methods of delivering heat to an area, primarily with solar heat collector 
panels. Methods of heat transfer in space heating and heating domestic 
hot water. Includes the latest scientific and research data on energy con- 
servation. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

ACR 511 

INTRODUCTION TO REFRIGERATION 

Lectures, demonstrations, and lab assignments introduce concepts of 
basic refrigeration. Emphasizes the mechanical refrigeration system — in- 
cluding condenser, evaporators, compressor, refrigerant control devices, 
refrigerants, test equipment and service techniques. 5Cr. (3-6). 

ACR 521 

COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS 

Various types of installations — includes characteristics of items to be 
cooled in relationship to temperature, humidity, and air circulation. In- 
cludes techniques for balancing systems, system capacity, and use of 
heat load charts. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisites: ACR 51 1 , ELT531. Corequisite: 
ELT541. 



® 



ACR522 

INSTALLATION AND SERVICE PROBLEMS-COMMERCIAL 

REFRIGERATION 

Various types of installation procedures and service techniques used in 
commercial refrigeration. Includes piping design, codes, preventive 
maintenance, and system accessories. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisite: ACR 51 "I '. 
Corequisites: ELT541,ACR 521. 



ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY (ARC) 



ARC 102 

BASIC ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING 

Fundamentals of architectural drawing for woodworking technology. Use 
and care of drawing instruments and media. Lettering, orthographic pro- 
jection principles, preliminary drawing and sketching, preparation of 
working drawings, exterior and interior finish work, detailing cabinet and 
mill work. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

ARC 111 
STATICS 

The study of forces and equilibrium as related to building support 
columns and beams. Algebraic and graphic determination of loads, reac- 
tions, shear and moment, deflection, loading and buckling, truss design, 
properties of areas. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

ARC 112 

ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS I 

Basic architectural graphic media; projection drawings, axonometricsand 
perspective; color and texture; introduction to the architectural model; 
basic vocabulary of architectural drawings; composition, space, form, 
value, texture, shades, shadows. 4 Cr. (1-9). 

ARC 115 

WORKING DRAWINGS- RESIDENTIAL 

Laboratory practice and theory in producing residential architectural 
working drawings; emphasis on preparation, technique, content, 
thoroughness, continuity, lettering, presentation, quality. 3Cr. (1-6). 

ARC 116 

BUILDING MATERIALS I 

A study of the typical materials of building construction, their production, 
properties, use and performance in various combinations and methods of 
construction. 2 Cr. (2-0). 

ARC 121 
STRUCTURES -WOOD 

Theory and design of wood and timber structures. Identification, 
characteristics and classifications of wood. Working stresses; design and 
beams, columns, joints, rafters, planks, laminated sections; timber con- 
nections, fastenings and their working properties; laminated lumber 
shapes. 2Cr. (2-0). 

ARC 122 

ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS II 

Architectural rendering in various media; black and white and color pro- 
blems. Emphasis on developing techniques, style, presentation. 3 Cr. 
(1-6). 

ARC 125 

WORKING DRAWINGS - COMMERCIAL 

Laboratory practice and theory in producing non-residential architectural 
working drawings. Emphasizes technique in preparing drawings, content, 
lettering, line quality, and presentation quality. 3 Cr. (1-6). 



® 



ARC 232 

BUILDING MATERIALS II 

Subsurface exploration and foundations. Water and damp-proofing; 
methods and materials for masonry construction, concrete walls, slabs. 
Wall, floor, and roof systems; the curtain wall; fireproofing; building 
codes; architectural hardware. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: ARC 116. 

ARC 233 

BUILDING EQUIPMENT I 

Theory and design of plumbing, heating, air conditioning, and control 
systems. Sources and design of water supply systems; sanitary and 
storm systems. Computation of plumbing, heating, and cooling loads. 3 
Cr. (3-0). 

ARC 236 

DESIGN STUDIO I 

Introduction to the relation of space and function to the environmental 
needs of people. Application of principles and methods in solving design 
problems. Includes identification of function, data collection, site 
analysis, and programming. Development of visual and graphic skills and 
techniques. 5Cr. (2-9). 

ARC 237 

SEMINAR IN ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY 

An overview of Western art emphasizing architecture from Egypt to con- 
temporary international styles. The course emphasizes nineteenth and 
twentieth century architects and their work. 5Cr. (5-0). 

ARC 238 
STRUCTURES -STEEL 

The theory and design of structural components in steel: beams, col- 
umns, connections, joists, and trusses. A study of the factors involved in 
selecting a structural framing system in architecture and the use of the 
AISC Manual. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

ARC 242 

BUILDING EQUIPMENT II 

Theory and design of electrical service distribution systems. Selection of 
electrical equipment, and fixtures. Electrical heating design. Theory and 
measurement of light and sound; vertical transportation systems; sound 
systems. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

ARC 244 

PROFESSIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND CONTRACT 

DOCUMENTS 

Architectural registration, professional organization, ethics; types of ar- 
chitectural service. Contract law; bonds, liens; codes; insurance; bidding 
procedures; estimating; specification writing. Supervision and ad- 
ministration of construction. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

ARC 246 

DESIGN STUDIO II 

Environmental systems (ventilation, etc.), their analysis and integration in 
the design process. The application of design theory and methods in a 
creative design project. The project will also involve site analysis and 
planning, programming and program analysis of more complex problems. 
6Cr. (2-12). 

ARC 247 

STRUCTURES - CONCRETE 

The theory and design of reinforced concrete: beams, columns, slabs, 
footings, retaining walls. A study of structural framing systems used in 
reinforced concrete buildings. 3 Cr. (3-0). 



AUTO BODY REPAIR (ABC) 



ABC 713 

BASIC AUTO BODY (8 weeks) 

Basic theory and practice in trade fundamentals; body and chassis com- 
ponents; sanding; masking. 7 Cr. (8-16). 



ABC 714 

METAL WORK (8 weeks) 

Metal work; gas welding; metal stretching and shrinking; fasteners; 
riveting. 7 Cr. (8-16). 

ABC 723 

AUTO BODY MAINTENANCE (8 weeks) 

Exterior and interior cleaning, water and air leaks, rattles, trim work. 
7 Cr. (8-16). Prerequisites: ABC 713, ABC 714. 

ABC 724 

PANEL ALIGNMENT (8 weeks) 

Panel alignment; front and rear suspension alignment, frame alignment. 

7 Cr. (8-16). Prerequisite: ABC 723. 

ABC 833 

METAL WORK AND FILLING (8 weeks) 

Straightening metal, panel fabrication, panel replacement; use of fillers. 

7 Cr. (8-16). Prerequisites: ABC 713, ABC 714, ABC 723, ABC 724. 

ABC 834 

PAINTING (8 weeks) 

Surface preparation, paint application, paint problems, paint equipment. 
7Cr. (8-16). Prerequisite: ABC 833. 

ABC 843 

TOOLS, EQUIPMENT AND COLLISION REPAIRS (8 weeks) 

Frame gauges, frame clamps, hydraulic equipment, hand tools and 
power tools. 7 Cr. (8-16). Prerequisites: ABC 713, ABC 714, ABC 723, ABC 
724, ABC 833, ABC 834. 

ABC 844 

PAINTING AND ESTIMATING (8 weeks) 

Collision damage, damage appraisal, repair procedures and techniques. 
7 Cr. (8-16). Prerequisite: ABC 843. 



AUTOMOTIVE (AMT) 



AMT510 

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINE SYSTEMS 1 18 weeks) 

Operating principles of internal combustion engines. Two and four stroke 
cycle. Mechanical components. Precision measuring tools. Engine 
systems, including induction, valve, fuel, emission control, lubrication 
and cooling. Fundamentals of fuel metering units. Introduction to ignition 
systems. Emphasis on operating principles and basic trouble analysis. 6 
Cr. (7-15). 

AMT 511 

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINE SYSTEMS II (8 weeks) 
Fundamentals of electricity, magnetism, and electronics. Overview of 
vehicular electrical systems. Ohm's Law and electron theory. Emphasis 
on engine related circuits, including charging, cranking, ignition, com- 
puter controls, and electronic fuel injection. Use of test meters and 
oscilloscope for troubleshooting. 6 Cr. (7-15). 

AMT 520 

PRINCIPLES OF CHASSIS SYSTEMS (8 weeks) 

Fundamentals of automotive hydraulics. Theory and basic service techni- 
ques in brake systems, steering, suspension, and chassis electrical 
systems. Wheel balancing, use of brake lathe, tire service methods, in- 
troduction to wheel alignment. 6 Cr. (7-15). 

AMT 521 

PRINCIPLES OF POWER TRAIN AND ACCESSORIES (8 weeks) 

Theory and basic service techniques in standard transmissions, clutches, 
U-joints, C-V joints, drive shafts, axles, transaxles, and differentials. In- 
troduction to air conditioning, heating and selected accessory systems. 
Overview of automatic transmission operation. 6 Cr. (7-15). 



AMT 630 

POWER TRAIN AND ACCESSORY SERVICE (8 weeks) 

Procedures, techniques and special tools for service and repair of com- 
mon standard transmissions, transaxles, differentials, U-joints and other 
selected power train components. Repair of air conditioners, window 
regulators, and other selected accessories. Introduction to Automatic 
Transmission Service. 6 Cr. (6-18). Prerequisite: AMT 521 . 

AMT 631 

ENGINE SYSTEM SERVICE (8 weeks) 

Procedures, techniques and test instruments used for tune-up, minor 

engine repairs, servicing emission controls, engine electrical repairs, and 

general under the hood service. Use of oscilloscope, electrical meters, 

and chassis dynamometer for problem diagnosis. 6 Cr. (6-18). 

Prerequisites: AMT 5 10 and AMT 511. 

AMT 640 

CHASSIS SYSTEMS SERVICE (8 weeks) 

Procedures, techniques, and special tools used for common repairs of 
brakes, suspension, exhaust and chassis electrical systems. Wheel 
balancing and tire service. Steering repairs. Introduction to Wheel Align- 
ment Service. Study of State Inspection Safety Code. Emphasis on State 
Inspection Repairs. 6 Cr. (6-18). Prerequisite: AMT 520. 

AMT 641 

AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION AND AIR CONDITIONING 

SERVICE (8 weeks) 

Diagnosing transmission problems. Procedures, techniques and special 
tools used to overhaul transmissions and transaxles. Emphasis on 
automatic transmissions. Operating principles of automatic transmis- 
sions, including planetary gearing and hydraulics. Transmissions selected 
for overhaul will be common applications. 6 Cr. (6-18). 
Prerequisite: AMT 630 or Division permission. 

AMT 642 

ENGINE AND ELECTRICAL OVERHAUL (8 weeks) 

Diagnosing the need for engine overhaul. Procedures, techniques, and 
special tools used to overhaul the engine, except for major machining 
operations. Emphasis on common operations and types of engines. 
Repair of selected electrical components as appropriate. 6 Cr. (6-18). 
Prerequisite: AMT 51 1 or Division permission. 

AMT 643 

WHEEL ALIGNMENT AND ADVANCED CHASSIS SERVICE 

(8 weeks) 

Methods of wheel alignment and balance. Use of various types of 
alignment racks and instruments. Experience in diagnosing steering, 
alignment, and suspension problems. Procedures for overhauling power 
steering units. Repair or replacement of selected special steering and 
suspension components. 6 Cr. (6-18). Prerequisite: AMT 520 or Division 
permission. 



AVIATION (APC) 



Lecture and lab hours shown are for an entire semester. 

APC 513 

BASIC ELECTRICITY 

Basic electrical theory as it applies to Ohm's Law. Application of AC-DC 
circuits. Use of electrical measuring instruments and diagrams. Principles 
of aircraft electrical components and power systems. 3 Cr. (45-33). 

APC 514 

FEDERAL AIR REGULATIONS, RECORDS, AND PUBLICATIONS 
Federal aviation regulations under parts 43, 65, and 145 as they apply to 
the privileges and limitations of the mechanic. The use of aircraft 
maintenance publications, records, and forms. 2 Cr. (24-17). 



83 



APC515 

MATERIAL AND PROCESSES 

An introduction to precision measurement equipment. Identification and 
selection of aircraft hardware and materials. The process of heat treating 
and inspecting materials by visual and non-destructive test methods. 3 
Cr. (38-38). 

APC516 

AIRCRAFT SERVICING/FLUIDLINERS AND FITTINGS 

Identification of aircraft fuel and lubricants, ground operations move- 
ment, security and safety precautions necessary with aircraft. Includes 
the secretion and use of cleaning materials, and procedures for corrosion 
control. The fabrication and installation of rigid and flexible fluid liners 
and fittings. 3 Cr. (31-56). 

APC517 

WEIGHT AND BALANCE/PHYSICS 

The procedure for weighing aircraft, computing the various weights for 
proper balance and recording this data. Physics topics include the prin- 
ciples of simple machines, fluid and heat. 2Cr. (21-25). 

APC518 

TURBINE ENGINES 

Theory and operating principles of aircraft gas turbine engines and the 
functions of the engine components. 3 Cr. (35-45). Prerequisites: APC 

513, APC 514, APC 515, APC 516. Corequisites: APC 51 7, MTH 515. 

APC522 

ENGINE IGNITION SYSTEMS 

The inspection, service, troubleshooting, repair and theory of 
reciprocating and turbine engine ignition systems. Includes various 
related components. 3 Cr. (30-39). Prerequisites: APC 51 3, APC 514, APC 
515, APC 516, APC 517, MTH 515. Corequisite: EDT 104. 

APC 523 

ENGINE INDUCTION AND EXHAUST SYSTEMS 

Covers engine induction, ice and rain control, heat exchanges, super- 
chargers, and turbo chargers, and air intake and induction manifolds. In- 
cludes the theory, inspection, troubleshooting and repair of these com- 
ponents. Engine exhaust systems and their components are covered. 2 
Cr. (16-26). Prerequisites: APC 513, APC 514, APC 515, APC 516, APC 
517, MTH 515. Corequisite: EOT 104. 

APC 524 

ENGINE FUEL SYSTEMS 

Engine fuel systems including the inspection, service, troubleshooting, 
and repair of engine fuel pumps and related components. Also covers 
reciprocating and turbine engine fuel metering systems. 3 Cr. (28-40). 
Prerequisites: APC 513, APC 514, APC 515, APC 516, APC 51 7, MTH 515. 
Corequisite: EDT 104. 

APC 525 
PROPELLERS 

Theory, operating principles and maintenance practices for fixed pitch 
and constant speed propellers. Also covers propeller governing and 
synchronizing system, ICR control, and their related functions. 3 Cr. 
(38-471. Prerequisites: APC 513, APC 514, APC 515, APC 516, APC 517, 
MTH 515. Corequisite: EDT 104. 

APC 526 

RECIPROCATING ENGINES AND ENGINE INSPECTION 

Reciprocating engines including operating principles, nomenclature and 
inspection of parts and overhaul. The installation and adjustment of 
magnetos, fuel metering components, propeller and other components 
necessary for the operation of the engine. Inspection necessary for the 
safe operation of the engine. 7 Cr. (64-152). Prerequisites: APC 513, APC 

514, APC 51 5, APC 516, APC 51 7, MTH 515. Corequisite: EDT 104. 



® 



APC 633 

ENGINE COOLING AND LUBRICATING 

Details the inspection, service and repair of engine cooling and lubricating 
systems and components. 4 Cr. (44-39) . Prerequisites: APC 513, APC 514, 
APC 515, APC 516, APC 517, MTH 515, EDT 104. 

APC 634 

ENGINE FIRE PROTECTION AND INSTRUMENTS 

Operating principles and service of airframe fire warning and ex- 
tinguishing systems and smoke and carbon monoxide detection systems. 
Installation, operation, repair of airframe instrument systems. 2 Cr. 
(31-19). Prerequisites: APC 513, APC 514, APC 515, APC 516, APC 517, 
MTH 515, EDT 104. 

APC 635 

ENGINE ELECTRICAL 

The operation, installation and repair of engine electrical components. In- 
cludes wiring, controls, switches, protective devices, generating and 
starting units. 3 Cr. (44-34). Prerequisites: APC 513, APC 514, APC 515, 
APC 516, APC 517, MTH 515, EDT 104. 

APC 636 

AIRCRAFT ELECTRICAL 

Study and repair of airframe electrical circuits and components. Includes 
wiring, controls, switches, protective devices, lighting systems. AC/ DC 
circuits and related electrical accessories. 4 Cr. (46-30). Prerequisites: 
APC 513, APC 514, APC 515, APC 516, APC 51 7, MTH 515, EDT 104. 

APC 637 

AIRCRAFT COVERING, FINISHES AND WELDING 

The use of various fabrics in the construction of aircraft and the applica- 
tion of paints and dope. The theory and practice of welding and welding 
methods, and the safe use of welding equipment. 3 Cr. (34-56). Prere- 
quisites: APC 513, APC 514, APC 515, APC 516, APC 51 7, MTH 515, EDT 
104. 

APC 638 

AIRCRAFT ASSEMBLY AND RIGGING/INSPECTION 

The theory of flight including fixed wing aircraft and helicopter. Includes 
assembly of aircraft, installation and rigging controls and surfaces, balan- 
cing movable surfaces and alignment checks. Performance of airframe 
airworthiness inspections and conformity. 3 Cr. (28-56). Prerequisites: 
APC 513, APC 514, APC 515, APC 516, APC 51 7, MTH 515, EDT 104. 

APC 642 

AIRCRAFT SHEET METAL AND WOOD STRUCTURE 

Details methods for the use of rivets, fasteners, and metal working pro- 
cesses used in construction and repair of aircraft. Includes the inspection 
and repair of plastics, honey comb, and laminated structure. Also covers 
wood identification, inspection and repair. 6 Cr. (58-104). Prerequisites: 
APC 513, APC 514, APC 515, APC 516, APC 51 7, MTH 515, EDT 104. 

APC 643 

AIRCRAFT LANDING GEAR, HYDRAULICS, PNEUMATICS AND 

POSITION WARNING 

The inspection, operation, service and repair of aircraft landing gears, 
hydraulics and pneumatics. Landing gears including retraction systems, 
shock struts, brakes, wheels, tires and steering systems. Hydraulics and 
pneumatics including power and control systems, pumps, actuators, and 
special equipment. Position and warning systems including speed and 
take-off, anti-skid, and landing gear position units. 6 Cr. (74-88). Prere- 
quisites: APC 513, APC 514, APC 515, APC 516, APC 517, MTH 515, EDT 
104. 



APC644 

AIRCRAFT COMMUNICATIONS. NAVIGATION AND 

INSTRUMENTS 

Inspection, checks, and service of auto pilot, approach control, com- 
munication, and navigation systems as well as antennas. Includes the in- 
stallation, inspection and service of aircraft instruments and their 
systems. 2 Cr. (30-22). Prerequisites: APC 513, APC 514, APC 515, ARC 
516, APC 517, MTH515, EDT 104. 

APC 645 

AIRCRAFT ATMOSPHERE CONTROL AND ICE/RAIN CONTROL 

The various types of atmosphere control systems. Includes pressuriza- 
tion, heating, cooling, and ventilation as well as oxygen systems. Also 
covers the various pneumatic and electrical operated ICR and rain control 
systems. 3 Cr. (37-15). Prerequisites: APC 513, APC 514, APC 515, APC 
516, APC 51 7, MTH515, EDT 104. 

APC 646 

AIRCRAFT FUEL AND FIRE PROTECTION 

This course will cover aircraft fuel tanks and cells, pumps, filters, valves 
and related components, fuel quantity indicating systems and various fuel 
management systems. Fire and smoke detection and extinguishing 
systems, along with their service, troubleshooting and repair, are also in- 
cluded. 2 Cr. (30-22). Prerequisites: APC 513, APC 514, APC 515, APC 
516, APC 517, MTH515, EDT 104. 




BIOLOGY (BIO) 



BIO 110 

APPLIED HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY 

Study of human physiology and anatomy. Includes cells, tissues, and 
tumors, and digestive, excretory, cardiovascular, and endocrine systems. 
Other body systems as time permits. Diseases and immunology. 3 Cr. 
(3-0). 

BIO 111 

BASIC BOTANY (HORTICULTURE) 

Fundamentals of plant science, plant anatomy, physiology, taxonomy, 
reproduction, and genetics. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

BIO 113 

GENERAL BIOLOGY I 

Fundamental processes of living organisms. Main concepts of biology — 
beginning with considerations of the chemical basis of life. Structure, 
function, and evolution of cells. 4 Cr. (3-3). 

BIO 115 

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I 

A medically oriented study of the structure and function of the human 
body. For students specializing in nursing, medical technology, and 
biology. Lecture and laboratory. 4 Cr. (3-3). 

BIO 121 

BASIC ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

Human anatomy and physiology; cells, tissues, and tumors; nervous, ex- 
cretory, reproductive and endocrine systems; diseases; principles of 
chemistry; microbiology; and physics. For students who need a basic 
background in anatomy and physiology (e.g.. Secretarial Science- 
Medical). 3 Cr. (3-0). 



BIO 123 

GENERAL BIOLOGY II 

Continuation of BIO 113. Structure, function, interrelationships, and 
evolution of organisms. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisite: BIO 113 or permission of 
the instructor. 

BIO 125 

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II 

Continuation of BIO 115. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisite: BIO 115. 

BIO 201 
MICROBIOLOGY 

Biology of microorganisms. Includes bacteria, rickettsiae, viruses, fungi, 
protozoa, and helminths. Relationship between microorganisms and 
higher forms of life. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisite: BIO 123. 

BIO 203 

GENERAL BOTANY 

Introduction to plant physiology, plant life cycles, and plant taxonomy. 4 
Cr. (3-3). Prerequisite: BIO 123. 

BIO 208 
ECOLOGY 

Basic principles of the relationships between plants and animals and their 
environments. Physical factors, energy and chemical cycles in the 
ecosystem, population and community characteristics, ecological suc- 
cession, aquatic and terrestrial ecology. Local terrestrial and aquatic en- 
vironments. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisite: One semester of college level 
biology. 

BIO 290 

SPECIAL STUDIES IN BIOLOGY 

Special attention to particular abilities and interests of students. In- 
dividual guidance in advanced studies. Admission by permission of the in- 
structor. (1-3, laboratory as required). 



BROADCASTING (BRC) 



BRC114 

AUDIO IN MEDIA 

An introductory course in the use of audio equipment in mass com- 
munications. Emphasizes components of an audio production chain and 
how these components can be used for various audio applications. Pro- 
vides "hands-on" experience with tape machines, turntables, mixing 
boards, microphones, and editing equipment. Includes proper 
maintenance of equipment. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

BRC 126 

INTRODUCTION TO RADIO STATION OPERATION 

Working as part of the staff of an operational radio station, students do 
basic production, writing and announcing for their department and are 
assigned at least one announcing shift per week. Workshops on refined 
production techniques will be held both within departments and for 
station staff. Emphasizes "hands-on" application of theories and skills 
learned in the introductory audio course. 2 Cr. (0-6). 
Prerequisite: BRC 114. 

BRC 223 

BROADCAST WRITING 

This practical writing course combines the theory of writing for aural and 
visual media with "hands-on" experience. Includes the basic elements of 
audio and video copy, and explores in some detail such applications as 
news, promotional announcements and program length copy. 3 Cr. (3-0). 
Prerequisites: BRC 1 14, JOU 1 1 1. 



® 



BRC233 

BROADCAST ANNOUNCING 

Students develop announcing techniques for many of the jobs in the 
broadcast industry and allied fields. Includes announcing of news, sports, 
interviews, musical selections and shows, and instructional/ industrial 
programming. Emphasizes the principles of communication underlying 
those skills. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisites: BRC 1 14 and ENL 202. 

BRC 236 

RADIO STATION OPERATION AND MANAGEMENT 

Students assume a management position and a subordinate position as 

they operate and manage the college radio station. Students run and 

attend department meetings. Weekly student staff meetings are held to 

assess staff performance and analyze achievements and needs. Periodic 

workshops develop production skills for remotes, develop management 

and employee skills, and sharpen interview/cover letter skills. 2 Cr. (0-6). 

Prerequisite: BRC 126. 

BRC 242 

BROADCAST MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM 

Concentrated practical experience as a supervisor in a small radio 
station — the College's station. Includes weekly lecture/seminar session 
which develops skills in conducting station staff meetings and managing 
broadcast sales. Students supervise and assist in training other students 
in various aspects of radio station operation and complete a station pro- 
ject with the help of their staff. 3 Cr. (1-6). Prerequisite: BRC 236. 



BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY (BCT) 



BCT110 

SITE PREPARATION AND LAYOUT 

Introduction to site preparation and layout of structures. The use of the 
builder's level, level rods, tapes and surveying equipment. Triangle 
calculations, differential leveling and erection of batter boards and 
markers are included in this course. 2 Cr. (1-3). 

BCT 114 

WOOD CONSTRUCTION I 

Basic principles and skills used in hand and machine woodworking opera- 
tions. A study of materials and fasteners used in woodworking. Types of 
and application of framing for residential and light commercial construc- 
tion. 5 Cr. (2-9). 

BCT 115 

CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS 

A study of building materials used in residential and commercial construc- 
tion, their production, properties, and use. Special fasteners, hardware, 
and compounds used for construction. 2 Cr. (2-0). 

BCT 120 

BLUEPRINTS, SPECIFICATIONS, AND CODES 

Techniques in reading and interpreting blueprints and specifications. In- 
struction in reading plan views, elevations, and details typical of working 
drawings. Emphasis is placed upon specifications and their relationship to 
working drawings. 2 Cr. (2-0). 

BCT 125 

WOOD CONSTRUCTION II 

Advanced framing practices including cantilevers, patio-decks, and post 
and beam construction. Roof framing principles and applications for 
gable, hip and intersecting roof designs. 5 Cr. (2-9). 



BCT 230 

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION I 

Introduction to the methods of light and heavy commercial structures. 
Metal framing materials, trusses, laminated beams and prefabricated 
materials are included. Reinforced concrete, masonry and steel structures 
are discussed. 2 Cr. (2-0). 

BCT 233 

MASONRY CONSTRUCTION I 

Introduction to masonry construction materials and methods. The laying 
out of block and brick construction. 5 Cr. (2-9). 

BCT 235 

WOOD CONSTRUCTION III 

Develop skills in the selection and installation of siding and roofing 
materials. Installation of windows, exterior doors, garage doors, and 
cornice work. 5 Cr. (2-9). 

BCT 236 

INTERIOR FINISH MATERIALS 

Modern finish materials and methods used to apply finish materials: 
drywall, plaster, tile, paneling, wallpaper, flooring, linoleum, carpet and 
ceiling treatments. 4 Cr. (1-9). 

BCT 237 

HOME REMODELING I 

An introduction to the evaluation, planning and implementation of 
residential remodeling. Techniques used in evaluating and planning 
bathrooms, kitchens, additions and basement conversions. Remodeling 
materials and methods of construction are covered in this course. 2 Cr. 
(2-0). 

BCT 238 

CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION 

Principles of concrete design — water-cement ratio, proportions of ingre- 
dients, reinforced concrete, concrete footers and walls, finishing with 
hand and power trowel equipment, proper methods of curing and testing 
concrete. 3Cr. (1-6). 

BCT 240 

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION II 

Principles and methods of commercial construction applied to construc- 
tion projects in the community and shop. 2 Cr. (0-6). 

BCT 244 

CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATING AND MANAGEMENT 

Study of construction estimating and project management for both 
residential and commercial structures. Students learn how to calculate 
construction costs and develop construction schedules. 2 Cr. (2-0). 

BCT 245 

PRACTICAL CONSTRUCTION EXPERIENCE 

Use of the knowledge and skills acquired in the construction curriculum. 
Supervised permanent projects on and around campus. When practical, 
the student participates in all stages of a project — from planning through 
construction. 3 Cr. (0-9). 

BCT 246 

MASONRY CONSTRUCTION II 

A continuation of BCT 233. Study and application of advanced methods 
and materials used in brick and stone masonry construction. 4 Cr. (1-9). 

BCT 247 

WOOD CONSTRUCTION IV 

Principles and method of interior carpentry construction. Includes the in- 
stallation of interior trim, doors and stair building. Advanced woodwork- 
ing techniques and cabinetry. 5 Cr. (2-9). 



86 



BCT248 

HOME REMODELING II 

The application of home remodeling principles and skills on projects in the 
community and shop. 4 Cr. (1-9). 

BCT254 

CARPENTRY FOR THE TRADES 

Theory and laboratory assignments in basic residential and commercial 
carpentry. The technical aspects of frame construction, construction 
materials, use of carpentry tools and equipment, and job safety. Methods 
and techniques of applying carpentry skills in the trade areas. 2 Cr. (1-3). 



BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (MGT) 



MGT110 

PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS 

Introduction to the various types of business organizations, from a legal 
as well as administrative viewpoint. Emphasizes terminology as applied in 
such fields as economics, finance, marketing, and business law. Includes 
basic concepts of management — from the establishment of objectives 
through planning, organizing, policy formulation, taking action, measur- 
ing and evaluating, and performance improvement. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

MGT 111 

BUSINESS MATHEMATICS 

Fundamentals of mathematics as applied in addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, and division. The use of percent, interest, depreciation 
and installment buying in the modern business world. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

MGT 125 
FINANCE 

Includes valuation principles, risk assessment, analysis of financial 
statements, working capital management, alternate financing strategies, 
capital budgeting, optimum financial decision making, and analysis in- 
volving the cost of capital. Includes the analysis of current market trends 
and projections. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisites: ACC J 72, ACC J 22 or Division 
permission. 

MGT 230 

BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 

Application of communication skills: listening, reading, writing, and 
speaking accurately, briefly, and clearly. Students are trained to write all 
types of business communications. Includes the techniques of personal 
and interpersonal relations to prepare the student to perform well and to 
advance in a career. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

MGT 231 
BUSINESS LAW I 

Introduction to the judicial process, the social implications of law, the 
roles of government and labor unions in the formulation of business laws. 
In-depth study of rights and obligations as they apply to contract law. 3 
Cr. (3-0). 

MGT 235 

BUSINESS PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychological principles as applied in modern business. Encourages the 
proper attitudes toward work and people. Gives the student an 
awareness of human relations skills needed to be an efficient employee 
and an effective leader, both on and off the job. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

MGT 237 

BANKING AND INVESTMENTS 

Introduction to banking and investments. Explains how institutions can 
best meet the needs of society. Provides a foundation for understanding 
how banks operate today, and why and how they have evolved to their 
present state. 3Cr. (3-0). 



MGT 238 
INSURANCE 

Structure and practices of the insurance field. The uses of various types 
of insurance policies and their importance for personal and business 
success are stressed. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

MGT 241 
BUSINESS LAW II 

Based on the objectives of Business Law I. Provides an in-depth study of 
the laws of agency and employment relations, commercial paper, per- 
sonal property, bailments, and sales. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: MGT 237. 

MGT 247 

SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

Introduction to the problems of owning and operating a business of one's 
own. Necessary personal characteristics, problems involved in buying 
and initiating a new business, and the activities of management are 
covered. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

MGT 248 

SUPERVISION AND HUMAN RELATIONS 

Duties and responsibilities of the first-line supervisor and manager who 
holds up to a middle-level management position are studied from a 
behavioral point of view and in relation to how he/she influences others 
to accomplish organizational goals. Includes motivation, job enrichment, 
rules of leadership, and interpersonal relationships. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prere- 
quisite: MGT 7 70 or Division permission. 




CHEMISTRY (CHM) 



CHM 100 

FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMISTRY 

Introduction to basic concepts of inorganic and organic chemistry. Essen- 
tially non-mathematical. For students who have never had chemistry or 
whose background is very weak. Prepares students for CHM 105 or CHM 
111. 4Cr. (3-3). 

CHM 105 

GENERAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Introduction to the major classes of organic compounds. Includes brief 
review of some inorganic concepts in relation to organic reactions. For 
non-science students who need to fulfill a lab science requirement and for 
science students as an introduction to CHM 203. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prere- 
quisites: High school chemistry or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 107 

GENERAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Introduction to the major classes of organic compounds. Includes brief 
review of some inorganic concepts in relation to organic reactions. 3 Cr. 
(3-0). Cannot be used to satisfy lab science requirements. Prerequisites: 
High school chemistry or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 109 

CHEMISTRY FOR GRAPHIC ARTS 

Introductory treatment of basic concepts of chemistry as related to 
graphic arts processes, with major emphasis on the chemistry of 
photography. Applications of these concepts will involve laboratory 
work. Intended for Graphic Arts students. 3 Cr. (3-0). 



® 



CHM 111 

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 

Principles of modern chemistry. Emphasizes inorganic aspects. For 
science majors and non-science students who need to fulfill a lab science 
requirement. Prepares students for CHM 121 or CHM 203. 4 Cr. (3-3). 
Prerequisites: High school algebra or equivalent; high school chemistry 
desirable but not required. 

CHM 121 

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 

Continuation of CHM 111. For science majors and non-science students 
who need to fulfill a lab science requirement — the latter may elect CHM 
105 instead of CHM 121. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisites: CHM 111 or high 
school chemistry with permission of the instructor. 

CHM 203 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 

The major classes of organic compounds. Emphasizes molecular struc- 
ture and reaction mechanisms. Intended for science majors. 4 Cr. (3-3). 
Prerequisites: CHM 105 or CHM 111, or high school chemistry with permis- 
sion of the instructor. 



CHM 204 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 

Continuation of CHM 203. 
equivalent. 



4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisites: CHM 203 or 



CHM 290 

SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY 

A flexible course to meet special needs or interests of science or non- 
science students. Lectures may be supplemented with lab work as 
needed. 1 to 4 Cr. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (CET) 



CET 111 

MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION 

Properties of concrete, aggregates, asphalt, steel, wood, plastics, clay 
products and miscellaneous construction materials. Methods of testing 
and sampling construction materials. Applying knowledge of and data on 
materials in designing structures. 2 Cr. (2-0). 

CET 112 

ENGINEERING DRAWING 

Use of engineering drawing instruments; lettering; geometric construc- 
tions; orthographic projection; dimensioning; sketching. Architectural 
drawing — including plans, elevations, details, and site plans. Structural 
drawing including uses and detailing for wood, concrete, and steel struc- 
tures. 3 Cr. (1-6). 

CET 113 

INTRODUCTORY SURVEYING 

Introduction to surveying; use and care of instruments. Simple surveys 
with compass, transit, level and tape. Notekeeping; computations; 
preparing planimetric map. 2 Cr. (1-3). 

CET 121 

PLANE SURVEYING 

Theory and practice of plane surveying; traverses and elementary 
triangulation; three-wire differential, trigonometric and reciprocal level- 
ing; stadia and plane table surveys; adjustment of instruments; analytical 
geometry for surveying. 4 Cr. (1-9). Prerequisites: CET 113, MTH 103. Co- 
requisite: MTH 104. 



CET 122 

TOPOGRAPHIC DRAWING & CARTOGRAPHY 

Use of conventional signs in mapping. The construction of large-scale 
topographic maps, logical contouring, profiles, photographic and map in- 
terpretation. Methods of plotting, use and construction of small scale 
maps, earth's coordinate system, map projections, enlargement and 
reduction of maps, scribing techniques, photographic color separation, 
typography, thematic maps, reproduction, and processing. 3 Cr. (1-6). 
Prerequisite: CET 112. 

CET 231 

ROUTE SURVEYING 

Highway curves (horizontal and vertical); field stake out cross sections; 
slope staking; determination of earthwork; plan and profile; profile level- 
ing; polaris and solar observations for bearing; route location on 
topographic map. 4 Cr. (1-9). Prerequisite: CET 121. 

CET 232 

ORIGIN. DISTRIBUTION & BEHAVIOR OF SOILS 

Geologic origin of soils; minerals, rocks, rock structures, weathering, 
glaciation, erosion and deposition. Distribution of soils in North America; 
residual, glacial and water-wind deposited soils. Soil characteristics and 
behavior; engineering classification, volume-weight relationships, 
physical properties, supporting capabilities for foundation elements and 
sampling methods. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisite: MTH 104. Corequisite: 
PHS 100. 

CET 233 
STATICS 

Basic principles of statics; coplanar and non-coplanar force systems; fric- 
tion; centroids and moments of inertia; hydrostatic pressures and loads. 3 
Cr. (3-1). Prerequisite: MTH 104. 

CET 234 

HIGHWAY ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

Highway systems, organization and planning; right-of-way; driver, vehi- 
cle and road characteristics; highway design, traffic engineering; 
drainage; engineering economics; pavement design; construction and 
maintenance. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

CET 242 

FLUID MECHANICS 

Mechanics of fluids; fluid flow in conduits and around bodies; liquid flow 
in open channels; friction and energy loss; fluid measurements; pumps; 
similitude and dimensional analysis. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisites: PHS 100, 
CET 233. 

CET 243 

STRENGTH OF MATERIALS 

Engineering materials and properties; stress and deformation; shear and 
moment in beams; stresses in beams; beam design for wood and steel; 
beam deflection; statically indeterminate beams; combined stresses; col- 
umn design. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: CET 233. 

CET 244 
PHOTOGRAMMETRY 

Use and application of aerial photographs; mapping by photogrammetric 
methods; geometry of aerial photographs; stereoscopy; overlapping 
aerial photographs; aerial triangulation; flight planning; photographic 
principles, tilted aerial photos; cost estimation; contracts and specifica- 
tions; remote sensinq. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisite: CET 122. 

CET 245 

ADVANCED SURVEYING 

Horizontal and vertical control surveys; triangulation and level nets; three 
point solution; planning and estimating from topographic maps; state 
plane coordinate systems, public land surveys; boundary surveys, elec- 
tronic distance measurement; theodolites. 2 Cr. (1-3). Corequisite: CET 
121. 



COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CSC) 



CSC 102 

INTRODUCTION TO MICROCOMPUTERS 

Covers use of the microcomputer as a tool for solving practical problems. 
Introduces non-computer science students to computer technology con- 
cepts and the operation and management of a typical "personal" com- 
puter. Students will use application software for word processing and 
electronic spreadsheet analysis, and the BASIC language for programm- 
ing computer solutions to a variety of problems. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

CSC 103 

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS WITH FORTRAN 

Presents data processing concepts, methods and applications through 
the medium of the FORTRAN IV programming language. Topics include 
computer system history, principles and operations, programming 
language structure, problem analysis and flowcharting, and computer 
solution of numerical problems using the FORTRAN IV language. 3 Cr. 
(3-0). 

CSC 104 

MICROCOMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS 

Provides an overview of microcomputer operations and applications. 
Students use the IBM Personal Computer to explore such topics as 
microcomputer operation and control, programming in BASIC, word pro- 
cessing, data management and electronic spreadsheet. The course 
assumes no previous knowledge of microcomputers and is a prerequisite 
for CSC 105, CSC 106and CSC 107. 1 Cr. (1-1). 

CSC 105 

WORD PROCESSING FOR MICROCOMPUTERS 

An introduction to word processing on the microcomputer. Students use 
a popular word processor software package to learn the concepts and 
commands needed to create, edit and print documents. 1 Cr. (1-1). Prere- 
quisite: CSC 104 or the equivalent. 

CSC 106 

DATA BASE FOR MICROCOMPUTERS 

An introduction to data management software in a microcomputer en- 
vironment. Students use a popular data management software package 
to explore such typical applications as mailing lists, inventories, budgets 
and other business functions. 1 Cr. (1-1). Prerequisite: CSC 104 or the 
equivalent. 

CSC 107 

SPREADSHEET FOR MICROCOMPUTERS 

An introduction to electronic spreadsheets in a microcomputer environ- 
ment. Using a popular spreadsheet software package students explore 
such typical business applications as budgeting, forecasting and plann- 
ing. 1 Cr. (1-1). Prerequisite: CSC 104 or the equivalent. 

CSC 112 

PROGRAMMING IN PASCAL 

Thorough coverage of the PASCAL language and its implementation 
under RSTS/E on the PDP 11/70. The strong compatibility between 
PASCAL, Top-Down Design, and Structured Programming will be em- 
phasized and integrated in all programming assignments. Programs will 
be assigned from a variety of disciplines in order to acquaint students 
with the power and versatility of the PASCAL language. 3 Cr. (3-0). Core- 
quisite: CSC 1 18. 

CSC 118 

FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Covers the terminology, concepts, system operating procedures and 
problem-solving techniques that are fundamental to the field of computer 
science and required for further coursework in programming languages 
and design techniques. Covers mainframe and microcomputer operation 
in depth. Special emphasis on developing the student's ability to under- 
stand as well as design the logical structures underlying a variety of data 
processing applications. 3 Cr. (3-0). 



CSC 120 

BUSINESS COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 

Emphasizes the use of the computer in typical business applications. 
Concentrates on the use of computer-based information systems to pro- 
vide information for effective management decision making. Includes 
database concepts, data entry, man/ machine interaction and data 
retrieval concepts. The course will use both mini and microcomputers. 3 
Cr. (3-0). Recommended prerequisites: CSC 118andACC 112. 

CSC 125 

DATA STRUCTURES 

Covers stacks, queues, linked lists and trees. Data structures will first be 
introduced as abstract concepts, then their physical implementations and 
operations will be developed and applied. Includes basic techniques for 
design and analysis of efficient algorithms for internal and external 
sorting/merging/searching. Additional topics include hashing, dynamic 
storage allocation, data compaction and recursion. Students will write 
PASCAL application programs to implement data structures. 3 Cr. (3-0). 
Prerequisite: CSC 1 12. 

CSC 128 

COBOL PROGRAMMING I 

Covers the COBOL computer language, language elements and division, 
program writing, execution, diagnostics, advanced programming con- 
cepts and techniques. Stresses documentation — including a written pro- 
blem statement — any required formula development, printer spacing for 
chart layouts, and the appropriate terminology for programming, 
card/tape and/or disc record layout, internal memory requirements, and 
a program flowchart. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: CSC 118. 

CSC 230 

COMPUTER SYSTEMS WITH ASSEMBLER 

A survey of technical topics related to computer systems with the em- 
phasis on the relationships between hardware architecture, system soft- 
ware and the assembly language. Includes an introduction to assembly 
language and the architecture of processors and storage systems. 3 Cr. 
(3-0). Prerequisites: CSC 1 18 and a programming language. 

CSC 231 
PROGRAMMING IN RPG 

REPORT PROGRAM GENERATING (RPG) programming, including 
writing, compiling and executing RPG programs. The programs written 
for this course are based on business applications and business oriented 
problems. Topics include sequential disc files, indexed disc files, tables, 
arrays, subroutines and interactive programming techniques. 3 Cr. (3-0). 
Prerequisites: CSC 1 18 and a programming language. 

CSC 232 

PROGRAMMING IN BASIC 

Covers the BASIC programming language in detail, adding to and 
developing concepts presented in CSC 118. Detailed discussion of the 
BASIC language, including operating procedures of a time-sharing 
system. Interactive programming techniques will be stressed through 
such topics as data conversion, string functions, sequential I/O, virtual 
I/O and record I/O. Programming techniques will be discussed. The 
course is geared to business data processing. A special project may be 
required. The course will use a mini or microcomputer. 3 Cr. (3-0). 
Prerequisite: CSC 118. 

CSC 235 

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN METHODS 

A systematic approach to the analysis and design of computer informa- 
tion systems. The course follows the systems development life cycle, em- 
phasizing the system documentation tools and techniques used in each 
phase. Introduction to both classical and structured approaches for 
describing process flows, data flows, data structures, file designs, input 
and output designs and program specifications. Discussion includes in- 
formation gathering and reporting activities and the transition from 
system design to initial operations. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisites: CSC 118 and 
CSC 128. 



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CSC 238 

COBOL PROGRAMMING II 

Introduction to structures used to represent the logical relationship be- 
tween elements of information and to the techniques used to work with 
information structures using tape and disc storage. Students examine 
how a complex computer programming task can be subdivided for max- 
imum clarity, efficiency, and ease of maintenance and modification. The 
concept of programming style permeates most of the material presented. 
Careful verification of program operation and documentation of programs 
are emphasized. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: CSC J 28. 

CSC 239 

FORTRAN WITH PLOTTING 

An introduction to FORTRAN language programming as applied to 
business and mathematics problems. Includes subprograms, table hand- 
ling and the use of the plotter to draw graphics. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisites: 
CSC 1 18 and a programming language. 

CSC 240 

FILE AND DATABASE PROCESSING 

An introduction to application program development in a database en- 
vironment. Emphasizes loading, modifying and querying the database 
using a host language and the DBMS query facilities. Also covers the 
logical-physical organization of data and random access devices. 3 Cr. 
(3-0). Prerequisite: CSC 125. 

CSC 244 

ADVANCED ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE 

An in-depth study with advanced applications of the assembly language. 
Includes system software. This course will be of particular benefit to 
students interested in system programming. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: CSC 
230. 

CSC 248 

APPLIED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT 

Integrates computer programming and systems development concepts, 
principles and practices into a comprehensive system development pro- 
ject. A team approach is used to analyze, design and document realistic 
methods. Project scheduling and control techniques, format presenta- 
tions and group dynamics are introduced into the solution of information 
systems problems. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisites: CSC 235, CSC 238. 



COMPUTER OPERATOR (COP) 



COP 713 

COMPUTER OPERATIONS I 

An introduction to the operation of equipment found in computer installa- 
tions. Topics include mounting tapes and disc packs, operating CRT's, 
line printers, console typewriters, card readers, keypunch machines, data 
recorders, card sorters, other unit record devices, forms handling equip- 
ment, electronic calculators, and duplicating machines. 6 Cr. (3-9). 

COP 723 

COMPUTER OPERATIONS II 

This course is designed to train the student in both the non-physical and 
physical aspects of data processing operations. Emphasizes software 
operations, the use of EDP manuals, and the actual functioning of a com- 
puter center. Other topics include computer hardware, disc and tape pro- 
cessing, and recovery techniques for hardware and software errors. 4 Cr. 
(3-3). Prerequisite: COP 713. 



COP 724 

COMPUTER OPERATIONS INTERNSHIP 

Students are assigned to computer installations for practical experience 
in computer operations. The student will receive on-the-job training in the 
College's computer center and/or various industrial locations. 2 Cr. (0-6). 
Prerequisite: COP 713. 



COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (CED) 



If co-op is taken in addition to the courses normally required for comple- 
tion of their program of study, students will register for co-op experience 
using the numbers below. If co-op experience is elected in place of the 
course(s) within a curriculum, the student will register for the course(s) to 
be replaced using the course identification number followed by the letter 
"C". Example: ABC 833C Metal Work and Filling. This indicates that the 
student is seeking credit for ABC 833 through participating in a co-op ex- 
perience. 

CED 101 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION I 

Designed for the associate degree or certificate student wishing to par- 
ticipate in a related educational work experience as an elective. The stu- 
dent will be placed with an approved employer in a job related to the skills 
and knowledge offered in his or her program. Variable 1-6 Cr. 

CED 102 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION II 

Designed for the associate degree or certificate student who has suc- 
cessfully completed CED 101 and wishes to participate in a second pro- 
gram of related educational work experience with the same or a new 
employer. Variable 1-6 Cr. 

CED 103 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION III 

This course is designed to assist the cooperative education student 
through the transition from college to the "world of work". A series of 
seminars emphasizes acquiring job application skills, adjusting to the 
work environment, and developing sound interpersonal relationships. A 
portion of the course will be devoted to methods of reporting the day- to- 
day and total experiences gained while on the job. CED 103 may be re- 
quired for co-op students prior to the initial job placement. No credit. 




DAIRY HERD MANAGEMENT (DHM) 



DHM711 

SOILS AND SOIL FERTILITY 

Students will study the different soil types found in Pennsylvania and 
relate soil types to fertility, plant growth and tillage. Will include the study 
of fertilizers, soil test reports, chemical applications related to texture and 
economically maximizing production. Lab sessions will include soil 
testing, lime and fertilizer selection and application and conservation. 3 
Cr. (2-3). 

DHM 712 

FORAGE PRODUCTION 

The course emphasizes the forage program as a vital part of the dairy 
operation. Includes forage production and handling and the economic im- 
portance of forage to the feeding program. Crops covered include corn — 
for silage and grain — alfalfa, haylage and dry hay, small grains and 
grasses. Students will participate in field crop planning as well as equip- 
ment operation and maintenance and weed control. 3 Cr. (1-6). 



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DHM 713 

DAIRY FEEDING AND MANAGEMENT 

Topics include feeding dairy animals for growth, reproduction and pro- 
duction. Analysis of forage, nutrient content of feeds and nutrient re- 
quirements of all dairy animals will be covered. Students will develop and 
balance rations and apply their knowledge in developing different feeding 
systems. 3 Cr. (1-6). 

DHM714 

DAIRY HERD HEALTH 

Stresses sanitation and hygiene in promoting animal health. Causes, 
symptoms and methods of prevention and control of common diseases 
will be covered. During lab practice students will perform less com- 
plicated veterinary practices. Students will practice day-to-day herd 
management skills needed for herd health. 3 Cr. (2-3) . 

DHM721 

FINANCING DAIRY ENTERPRISES 

The course covers financial aspects of dairy farming — including capital 
requirements, appraisal, sources of financing and credit applications. Ma- 
jor farm lending institutions will be emphasized. Financing as a manage- 
ment tool for the dairy operation will be covered. 3 Cr. (3-0I. 

DHM722 

MILKING MANAGEMENT 

Udder anatomy, milk secretion, milking machine function and use, 
sanitation, mastitis control and prevention. Management systems related 
to different facilities and equipment options will be discussed. Includes 
costs of operation and maintenance. 3 Cr. (1-6). 

DHM723 

FARM RECORDS, ANALYSIS AND COMPUTERS 

The course stresses management principles based on sound, properly 
recorded farm business transactions. Exercises concentrate on develop- 
ment of accurate records related to dairy farm operations. Records are 
then analyzed for taxation, depreciation, net worth and loans. Strengths 
and weaknesses will be identified. Computers will be used during various 
portions of the course. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

DHM 724 

ANIMAL BREEDING AND REPRODUCTION 

Emphasizes reading the genetic qualities of sires and determining herd 
deficiencies through judging and classifying cows. Includes animal 
genetics, breeding systems and reproductive organs. Covers breeding 
records, heat detection and artificial insemination procedures. 3 Cr. (1-6). 

DHM 725 

REPLACEMENT STOCK MANAGEMENT 

Course stresses the economic importance of raising quality herd 
replacements. Management of young stock will include animals from 
calves to heifers ready to enter the milking herd. A wide range of prac- 
tices will be discussed — including housing, health, identification and 
feeding. 3 Cr. (2-3). 



DENTAL HYGIENE (DHG) 



DHG100 

INTRODUCTION TO DENTAL HYGIENE 

An introduction to fundamental concepts and techniques of primary 
preventive measures. Includes use and care of dental equipment. 
4Cr. (2-6). 

DHG 115 

ORAL ANATOMY AND HISTOLOGY 

The development and structure of the oral and facial regions with the em- 
phasis on dental anatomy. 3 Cr. (3-0). 



DHG 121 

DENTAL MATERIALS 

Principles and manipulation of the physical, mechanical and chemical 
properties of dental materials. 2 Cr. (1-3). Prerequisites: DHG 100, DHG 
115, CHM107. 

DHG 123 
PERIODONTICS! 

A self-paced programmed course. Subject matter is presented through 
tapes, slides and manuals. Covers normal and healthy periodontium. The 
biological and clinical basis for the future understanding of periodontal 
disease. The pathology of the periodontium, including types, causes and 
prevention. 1 Cr. (0-3). Prerequisite: DHG 100, DHG 115. 

DHG 124 

CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE I 

Lectures are combined with practical experience in the clinic. Students 
begin to provide preventive oral health services. 4 Cr. (1-9). Prerequisites: 
DHG 100, DHG 115. 

DHG 126 

DENTAL RADIOLOGY 

The physics of radiation and radiation biology are related to the prin- 
ciples, techniques and interpretation of intra and extraoral radiographs. 
Quality in exposing and processing x-rays (with respect to the safety of 
the patient and operator) is stressed. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisites: DHG 100, 
DHG 115. 

DHG 230 

CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE II 

Additional experience in the techniques of performing complete patient 
services. Emphasizes advanced procedures. Special topics — including 
root planing and curettage, oral photography, pulp testing, ultrasonic 
scalers, etc. — are introduced and combined with clinical experience. 5 
Cr. (1-12). Prerequisites: DHG 121, DHG 123, DHG 124, DHG 126. 

DHG 236 
PERIODONTICS II 

A study of clinical diagnosis and treatment of periodontal disease. 
Stresses the importance of periodontal therapy and the role of the dental 
hygienist. 1 Cr. (1-0). Prerequisites: DHG 121. DHG 123, DHG 124. DHG 
126. 

DHG 239 

GENERAL AND ORAL PATHOLOGY 

General and oral disease. Emphasizes diseases and anomalies related to 
the oral cavity. 2 Cr. (2-0). Prerequisites: DHG 121, DHG 123, DHG 124, 
DHG 126, BIO 125, BIO 201. 

DHG 241 

COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH 

Philosophy of community dental health. Techniques of teaching preven- 
tive dental health to groups. Fluoridation, special dental health programs, 
use of statistical materials. Rotating assignments give students op- 
portunities to participate and observe in a variety of dental settings. 2 Cr. 
(2-0). Prerequisites: DHG 230, DHG 236, DHG 239, DHG 243, DHG 245. 

DHG 242 

CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE III 

Additional experience in dental hygiene techniques. 4 Cr. (0-121. Prere- 
quisites: DHG 230, DHG 236, DHG 239, DHG 243, DHG 245. 

DHG 243 

DENTAL SPECIALTIES 

Discussion of pedodontics, endodontics, oral surgery, operative den- 
tistry, combined with practice in expanded functions. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prere- 
quisites: DHG 121. DHG 123, DHG 124, DHG 126. 



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DHG244 

DENTAL PRACTICE ORIENTATION 

Ethics and jurisprudence, office procedures and management. Review for 
licensing examinations. 2 Cr. (2-01. Prerequisites: DHG 230, DHG 236, 
DHG 239, DHG 243, DHG 245. 

DHG 245 
PHARMACOLOGY 

The study of drugs to familiarize the students with their properties, 
preparation, effects upon the body, the modes of administration. Special 
consideration is given to those drugs which are of dental value including 
antibiotics, pain relieving drugs, antiseptics and anesthetics. Emphasis is 
placed on first aid and emergency treatment. 2 Cr. (2-0). Prerequisites: 
CHM 107, DHG 121, DHG 123, DHG 124, DHG 126. 



DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES 
(CHD, ENL, MTH, RDG) 



The College awards institutional credit for courses numbered 
001 -099. This credit will appear on the student's transcript and be 
included in calculating the cumulative grade point average. 
However, credits earned in courses numbered 001-099 may not 
replace any course or be used as electives required in a given pro- 
gram. 

CHD 100 

VALUE CLARIFICATION AND DECISION MAKING (8 weeks) 

This course is designed to improve the student's self understanding as 
well as to provide a "skills" orientation toward coping with life problems. 
The course is based on the concept that many of the skills, techniques, 
and strategies that individuals use in various life situations can be adapted 
and are almost universally applied in other kinds of life difficulties. The 
course attempts to show students that a "life plan" is complete only 
when one considers all aspects of the human condition as important. 1 
Elective Cr. (1.5-1.5). 

CHD 101 

CAREER EXPLORATION (8 weeks) 

Specific steps in the career decision making process are taught. Students 
explore the world of work as it relates to their values, interests and 
abilities. The course offers students a step by step process for use in mak- 
ing career decisions. 1 Elective Cr. (1.5-1.5). 

ENL 011 

BASIC ENGLISH 

This course emphasizes writing skills: organization, structure, content, 
style, and mechanics. Individualized instruction, instructor control of the 
writing process, limited class size, and personalization of grammar in- 
struction are characteristic of the course. 3 Institutional Cr. (3-0). This 
course may not replace any English requirement or elective in a program. 

MTH 001 
ARITHMETIC 

Presents the basic concepts and skills of arithmetic to prepare students 
for required mathematics courses. Pre and post-tests are used to insure 
mastery of units covered. 3 Institutional Cr. (3-0). 

MTH 002 

BASIC ALGEBRA 

Basic skills and concepts of arithmetic and algebra are presented based 
on the student's aptitudes and needs. Pre and post-tests are used to in- 
sure mastery of units covered. More than one semester may be required 
for mastery of the objectives. 3 Institutional Cr. (3-0). 



® 



RDG 010 

READING IMPROVEMENT 

Basic reading improvement for students with limited success in previous 
reading performance. Differences in ability and background will deter- 
mine areas each student will pursue. Emphasis on comprehension, 
vocabulary, speed, spelling. Students learn to take notes on textbook 
assignments. Audio tapes, reading machines, individualized materials, 
and handout sheets are available to encourage individual learning. 3 In- 
stitutional Cr. (3-0). 

RDG 099 
INDEPENDENT STUDY 

A course of study designed to meet the needs of students who need in- 
dividualized help with reading skills or study skills. No credit. (1-3). 

RDG 111 

COLLEGE READING. REASONING AND STUDY SKILLS 

This course is designed to enable students to acquire or review basic 
reading and study skills essential for success in college courses. Specific 
reading skills develop comprehension, vocabulary, and speed. Effective 
study habits and skills include: outlining, summarizing, underlining, note- 
taking, and test-taking techniques. The course will further develop the 
student's ability to process information in a logical way and foster the 
conscious development of cognitive learning skills. 3 Cr. (3-0) . 



DIESEL MECHANICS (DMC) 



Light Duty Diesel Service courses are listed on page 105. 

DMC 513 

INTRODUCTION TO DIESEL MECHANICS (8 weeks) 

Precision mechanical measurement. Basic fastening devices. Gasoline 
diesel engine operation and service. 7 Cr. (9-15). 

DMC 514 

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES (8 weeks) 

Introduction to diesel engines. Electrical systems, emphasizing cranking, 
lighting, ignition, charging circuits, hand tools, power tools, and bench 
work. 7 Cr. (9-15). 

DMC 523 

FOUR-CYCLE DIESEL ENGINES (8 weeks) 

Four-cycle diesel engine repair and overhaul. Emphasizes diesel truck 
engines. 7 Cr. (9-15). Prerequisites: DMC 513, DMC 514. 

DMC 524 

TWO-CYCLE DIESEL ENGINES (8 weeks) 

Two-cycle diesel engine repair and overhaul. Diesel power applications, 
including trucks. Air induction system overhaul and troubleshooting. 
Basic air-conditioning/refrigeration principles. 7 Cr. (9-15). Prerequisites: 
DMC 513, DMC 514, DMC 523. 

DMC 533 

FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS I (8 weeks) 

Introduction to diesel fuel injection systems. Principles of governing and 
mechanical governing. Principles of jerk type fuel systems. 7 Cr. (9-15). 
Prerequisites: DMC 513, DMC514, DMC 524, or SOE 725 or AMT 511 . 

DMC 534 

FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS II (8 weeks) 

Hydraulic governors. Principles of distributor type fuel systems. 7 Cr. 
(9-15). Prerequisites: DMC 51 3, DMC 514, DMC 523, DMC 524, DMC 533. 

DMC 543 

TRUCK TRACTOR POWER TRAIN (8 weeks) 

Truck power train. Clutch, transmission, driveline, and differential. 7 Cr. 
(9-15). Prerequisites: DMC 51 3, DMC 514, DMC 523, DMC 524. 



DMC544 

TRUCK TRACTOR CHASSIS (8 weeks) 

Truck chassis, brakes, and suspension. State inspection procedures. 7 
Cr. (9-15). Prerequisites: DMC 513, DMC 514, DMC 523, DMC 524, DMC 
543. 



DRAFTING-ENGINEERING (EDT) 



EDT 101 

MECHANICAL DRAWING 

Offered to students enrolled in non-drafting programs. Use of drawing in- 
struments, lettering, geometric construction, orthographic projection, 
isometric and oblique, dimensioning, sections, auxiliary views, threads 
and fasteners, working drawings. 2 Cr. (1-3). 

EDT 102 

ENGINEERING DRAFTING 

Practical applications of drafting in electrical construction for both 
domestic and commercial use. House diagrams with circuit schematics, 
wiring diagrams and developing bills of materials. Layout diagrams for 
public facilities — for example, the lighting system for a small communi- 
ty. 2 Cr. (1-3). 

EDT 103 

GEARS AND CAMS 

A study of motion transfer through the use of gears and cams. 2Cr. (1-3). 

EDT 104 

AIRCRAFT DRAWINGS 

Aircraft blueprint reading for aviation maintenance technicians. Em- 
phasizes reading and interpreting multiview drawings. Includes installa- 
tion diagrams, schematics, the use of charts and graphs. Making three 
dimensional sketches for repair and alterations to aircraft. 2 Cr. (1-3). 

EDT 107 

BLUEPRINT READING 

Blueprint reading for welders. Emphasizes the reading, drawing and inter- 
pretation of multiview drawings involving dimensions, notes, specifica- 
tions and welding symbols. 2 Cr. (1-3). 

EDT 108 

MANUFACTURING PROCESSES 

Covers the theory, demonstration, and hands-on applications of drilling, 
reaming, counterboring, countersinking, tapping, turning, milling, and 
grinding. Theory and demonstrations of numerical control equipment. 3 
Cr. (2-3). 

EDT 111 

BASIC DRAFTING I (8 weeks) 

Use of drawing instruments, lettering, geometric construction, 

orthographic projection, sectioning, dimensioning, auxiliary views, 

revolutions and freehand sketching. 4 Cr. (4-12). 

EDT 112 

BASIC DRAFTING II (8 weeks) 

Screwthreads and fastening devices, axonometric projection; isometric 

drawings. Sheet metal intersections and developments. 4 Cr. (4-12). 

Prerequisite: EDT 111. 

EDT 121 

POWER TRANSMISSION (8 weeks) 

Power and motion transfer through the use of gears and cams and other 
devices. 4 Cr. (4-12). Prerequisite: EDT 112. 

EDT 122 

MECHANISMS (8 weeks) 

Power and motion transfer through the use of various linkages and 
mechanisms. 4 Cr. (4-12). Prerequisite: EDT 121. 



EDT 201 

DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY 

Principles of orthographic projection. Fundamental problems involving 
the relationship of points, lines and planes in space; intersecting lines and 
planes; graphic computations for bearings and slopes of lines, strike and 
dip of planes. Solving problems related to the intersection of planes and 
solids. 3 Cr. (1-6). Prerequisite: High school background in drafting. 

EDT 231 

DETAIL AND ASSEMBLY DRAWINGS (8 weeks) 

Accurate working drawings, sub-assemblies and assemblies. Drawing 
details from sketches and other engineering specifications; applied 
strength of materials; bearings; lubrications; elementary design and 
simplified drafting. 4 Cr. (4-12). Prerequisite: EDT 112. 

EDT 232 

APPLIED DRAFTING TECHNIQUES (8 weeks) 

Making complex detail drawings based on industrial castings. Com- 
prehensive study of close tolerance dimensioning. Introduction to fluid 
mechanics; metric conversion. 4 Cr. (4-12). Prerequisite: EDT 231. 

EDT 241 

ADVANCED DETAIL I (8 weeks) 

Redesign of industrial castings into weldments. Making detail drawings 
from engineering layouts. Comprehensive study of welding, piping and 
layouts. Material strength in relation to weldments and piping design. 4 
Cr. (4-12). Prerequisite: EDT 232. 

EDT 242 

ADVANCED DETAIL II (8 weeks) 

Advanced study in and applications of drafting. The use of industrial 
layouts to make detail, assembly and sub-assembly drawings. Includes 
geometric tolerancing, true position dimensioning and surface specifica- 
tions which conform to industrial standards; structural drafting and 
reprodrafting. 4 Cr. (4-12). Prerequisite: EDT 232. 




ECONOMICS iECO) 



ECO 201 

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS 

Introduces basic economic terms and concepts. Analyzes United States 
economic system and compares it to those of other countries. Students 
apply theory in developing basic economic computations and graphs. 
Macroeconomics is emphasized; some microeconomic concepts (con- 
sumer demand, utility, elasticity of supply/demand) are studied. 3 Cr. 
(3-0). 

ECO 202 

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS 

A study of the theory of the firm. Analysis of economic problems involved 
in public policy decisions. Recommended for students intending to major 
in economics. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

ECO 290 

SPECIAL STUDIES IN ECONOMICS 

A flexible course designed to meet special needs of economics students. 
1-3 Cr. ( 1 to 3-0) . Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 



® 



EDUCATION (EDU) 



EDU 111 

INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION 

Study of the foundations of education — historical, economic, 
philosophical, and social — and their implications for education today. 3 
Cr. (3-0). 

EDU 121 

CHILDREN'S AND YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE 

Comprehensive survey of children's and young adult literature. Basic 
knowledge and understanding of authors, illustrators, and literary forms 
as background for work in a public area of a library. 3 Cr. (3-0). 



ELECTRIC (ELC, ELT) 



ELC711 

DIRECT CURRENT FUNDAMENTALS 

Basic electrical laws, electrical terms, batteries, electrostatics, electrical 
meters and instruments, direct current machinery. 6 Cr. (4-6). Core- 
quisite: MTH 710. 

ELC 712 

BASIC WIRING LAB 

Laboratory course in the tools and materials of the trade. Use and care of 
hand tools; instruction in wiring basic circuits; residential lighting and 
receptacle circuits, low voltage switching and control circuits; use of 
electrical underwriters rules in color coding. 3 Cr. (1-5). 

ELC 715 

MOTOR MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR 

Electrical and mechanical features of various single phase motors; lab 
work; development of knowledge and skills in rewinding and repairing 
single phase motors. 3 Cr. (1-5). 

ELC 721 

BASIC MOTOR CONTROL 

Theory and lab assignments in wiring starling and control equipment for 
DC and AC motors. Includes circuitry for start-stop stations, forward- 
reverse and jogging push button stations. Includes some speed control. 4 
Cr. (3-3). 

ELC 722 

ALTERNATING CURRENT FUNDAMENTALS 

Alternating current electricity as it relates to residential, commercial and 
industrial power use. Laws and formulas used to solve problems in the 
use of AC power; AC machinery; lab work in applying AC electrical prin- 
ciples. Practical experiences in hooking up equipment and instruments. 6 
Cr. (4-6). Prerequisite: ELC 711. Corequisite: MTH 500. 

ELC 726 

RESIDENTIAL BLUEPRINTS 

Electrical plans and specifications for a single family dwelling. Installation 
procedures for all types of circuits used in residential wiring. Includes 
switches, receptacles, special purpose outlets, heating systems, phones, 
television, and service entrance calculations. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

ELC 832 

ADVANCED MOTOR CONTROL 

Theory and laboratory assignments further develop skills acquired in ELC 
721. The study and use of speed controls, plugging equipment for brak- 
ing and dynamic braking, timing relays involving pneumatic and dash pot 
types. 3 Cr. (1-5). Prerequisite: ELC 721. 



ELC 833 

BASIC ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION LAB 

Experience in the use and installation of electrical materials. House wiring 
circuits, wiring boxes of many kinds, armored cable, Wiremold and 
romex, fluorescent and incandescent light switches and receptacle cir- 
cuits. 3 Cr. (1-6). Prerequisite: ELC 712. 

ELC 834 

BASIC ELECTRONICS FOR INDUSTRY 

Basic electronic concepts used in industrial control. Study of vacuum 
tubes, electronic circuits, solid state devices, symbols, and motor cir- 
cuits. Laboratory practice in using these devices demonstrates their use 
in industry. 6 Cr. (4-6). Prerequisite: ELC 722. 

ELC 835 

COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL BLUEPRINTS & EQUIPMENT 

The installation of commercial and industrial systems and equipment us- 
ing blueprints. Students learn to read and interpret these blueprints and 
become familiar with the equipment. 2 Cr. (2-0). 

ELC 845 

ADVANCED ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

Practice in the installation of rigid conduit and other electrical wireways. 
Pulling in and wiring motor controllers and other electrical equipment. 
Study of blueprints for large electrical construction jobs. 3 Cr. (0-9). 
Prerequisite: ELC 833. 

ELC 847 

PROGRAMMABLE CONTROL 

A practical and theoretical approach to the installation, programming, 
and maintenance of programmable control (P.C.) equipment. The ap- 
plication of P.C. in manufacturing processes. Theory covers the proper 
installation of P.C. equipment, especially the correct grounding applica- 
tions of processor units and the development of P.C. ladder diagrams. 
The practical work includes programming and changing operational pro- 
grams to prepare the student to work as a "line mechanic" on production 
lines using programmable controls. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisites: ELC 721, 
EL C 832 or related industrial experience. 

ELC 848 

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY ANALYSIS 

Theory and laboratory instruction in complex metering methods for in- 
dustrial equipment, static and logic circuitry, equipment troubleshooting 
and repair using schematic diagrams, power transmission and distribu- 
tion. 4 Cr. (2-6). Prerequisite: ELC 722. 

ELC 849 

INDUSTRIAL CONTROL 

Industrial control devices and control circuits and their applications in 
practical systems. Emphasizes solid state technology; laboratory ex- 
perience in constructing and troubleshooting the solid state control cir- 
cuits used in industry. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisites: ELC 832 and ELC 834. 

ELT 110 

ELECTRICITY FOR THE TRADES 

Theory and laboratory assignments in electrical design. Symbols used on 
building construction blueprints. Explanation of electrical diagrams. The 
use of the National Electrical Code as a governing agent which 
establishes wiring requirements. Residential wiring, switching, lighting, 
receptacles, and service entrances in the laboratory. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

ELT 111 

DIRECT CURRENT FUNDAMENTALS 

Basic principles of electricity and the laws and formulas which are used to 
solve electrical problems. Principles of magnetism and their relationship 
to direct current generators and motors and other electrical machinery. 
Laboratory work trains students to hook up equipment and instruments. 
5 Cr. (4-3). Corequisite: MTH 103. 



94 



ELT 112 

BASIC WIRING LAB 

Instruction in wiring basic electrical circuits, residential lighting and 
receptacle circuits. Low voltage switching and control circuits. Electrical 
underwriters rules. Proper use and care of hand tools. 3 Cr. (1-6). 

ELT 113 

ACCIDENT PREVENTION 

Principles of accident prevention in industry. Electrical safety procedures 
in all human activities; lifesaving techniques. 2 Cr. (2-0). 

ELT 122 

ALTERNATING CURRENT FUNDAMENTALS 

The fundamental principles of the behavior and flow of alternating cur- 
rent electricity. Includes problem solving, current, voltage, impedance, 
reactance and power factor in series and parallel circuits. Operating prin- 
ciples of AC motors, generators and control equipment. 5 Cr. (4-3). Prere- 
quisite: ELT 111. Corequisite: MTH 104. 

ELT 124 

ELECTRICAL BLUEPRINT READING AND NATIONAL ELECTRIC 

CODE 

The study of electric blueprints and specifications used for residential, 
commercial, and industrial systems in buildings. Calculating the load re- 
quirements established by Codes — the number of circuits and size of 
feeders. Designing and drawing layout diagrams, schematic diagrams, 
control diagrams. The study and design of remote control systems. 
Minimum standards set by the National Electrical Code. 4 Cr. (4-0) . 

ELT 125 

BASIC ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

Additional study in the use of electrical equipment and materials. Includes 
all types of wiring devices and wiring systems. Planning and installing 
electrical systems, bending conduit, pulling in wires, connecting devices, 
lighting systems and distribution systems. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisite: ELT 
112orELC712. 

ELT 233 

BASIC ELECTRONICS 

Fundamentals of electronics. Basic symbols, circuit configurations, elec- 
tron tubes, solid state devices; rectifier, amplifier, and oscillator circuits 
used in industrial work. Laboratory practice in industrial electronics in- 
cludes the layout and assembly of various circuits and solid state devices. 
6 Cr. (4-6). Prerequisite: ELT 122. 

ELT 234 

ELECTRICAL MOTOR CONTROL 

Motor control systems in industry — both simple and complex. Tracing 
circuits and troubleshooting a system from a schematic drawing. The 
principles of rotating and magnetic amplifiers, and static switching. 4 Cr. 
(3-3). 

ELT 241 

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS 

The use of electrical equipment and electrical testing apparatus to aid in 
locating and repairing malfunctions in equipment. Preventive 
maintenance and maintenance records. Use of voltmeters, ammeters, 
wattmeters, ohmmeters, megohmmeters, wheatstone bridge, 
tachometer, and all hand tools used in the electrical trade. 2 Cr. (1-3). 
Prerequisite: ELT 122. 

ELT 244 

ADVANCED ELECTRICAL THEORY 

Solution of network problems. Problems involving the charge and 
discharge of capacitors and rotating vectors. Problems in alternating elec- 
tricity. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: ELT 122. 



ELT 245 

INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROL 

A theoretical and practical approach to the application of Programmable 
Logic Control (PLC) in manufacturing processes. Theory covers the 
development of PLC ladder diagrams as applied in control systems. Prac- 
tical laboratory work with "industry standard" control equipment 
prepares students for technician level positions involving a wide range of 
production control work. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisite: ELT 234. 

ELT 531 

AIR CONDITIONING/REFRIGERATION ELECTRICITY 

Basic AC and DC circuitry, laws of electricity, uses of meters, and safety 
procedures in air conditioning and refrigeration. Practical techniques in 
wiring and sections of the National Electrical Code. 6 Cr. (4-6). 

ELT 541 

ELECTRIC MOTORS AND REFRIGERATION CONTROLS 

Theory of operation, applications, installation, and troubleshooting of the 
electrical control circuits and control devices used in air conditioning and 
refrigeration. The operation and application of basic types of motors used 
in the industry. 5 Cr. (3-6). 

ELT 551 

COMMERCIAL HVAC CONTROL 

Commercial HVAC controls and control systems, including electric, elec- 
tronic, and pneumatic systems. Solid state single zone and multizone 
logic modules. The control of variable volume systems. Microcomputer 
applications are included in the course material. Troubleshooting and the 
ability to read control diagrams are stressed throughout the course. 4 Cr. 
(3-3). 



ELECTRONICS (END 



ENT116 

INTRODUCTION TO SOLID STATE DEVICES 

Physics of solid state devices. AC and DC analysis of two terminal 
devices. DC analysis of three terminal devices along with basic circuit 
configurations. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite or corequisite: ENT 150, ENT 152. 

ENT 121 

INTERMEDIATE SOLID STATE DEVICES AND CIRCUITS 

Continuation of ENT 116. AC analysis of three terminal discrete devices 
including multi-stage circuits and feedback methods. Four-layer and 
other discrete devices are examined. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: ENT 116. 

ENT 127 

INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL ELECTRONICS 

Digital number systems and codes. Introduction to combinational and 
sequential logic circuits. Examination of logic families and their applica- 
tions. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: ENT 1 1 6 or permission of instructor. 

ENT 150 

DC FOR ELECTRONICS 

Introduction to direct current fundamentals of current flow, resistance 
and units of electrical measurement. Circuit analysis of series, parallel and 
complex series-parallel networks with Ohm's Law, Kirchoff's Law and ap- 
plicable network analysis theorems. 3 Cr. (3-0). Suggested prerequisite or 
corequisite: MTH 103. 

ENT 151 

DIRECT CURRENT CIRCUITS APPLICATIONS 

Application of DC theory concepts; wiring, soldering techniques and 
basic circuit construction practices for electronic circuits; use of analog 
test equipment and measuring techniques; safety practices for elec- 
tronics. 1 Cr. (0-3). Prerequisite or corequisite: ENT 150. 



95 



ENT152 

AC FOR ELECTRONICS 

A study of time varying waveforms, electrostatics and capacitors, 
magnetics and inductance. Analysis of resistive and reactive circuits for 
steady state and time varying waveforms. Mathematical analysis of com- 
plex resistive and reactive circuits with complex number (j operator) 
analysis techniques. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite or corequisite: ENT 150. Sug- 
gested prerequisite or corequisite: MTH 103. 

ENT 153 

AC CIRCUITS APPLICATIONS 

Application of AC theory concepts. Printed circuit board repair; use of 
laboratory grade oscilloscopes for measurement of time varying 
waveforms. 1 Cr. (0-3). Prerequisite or corequisite: ENT 151, ENT 152. 

ENT 154 

SOLID STATE DEVICES APPLICATIONS 

Prototype solid state circuits utilizing two and three terminal devices are 
constructed. Parameter measurements on these prototypes are made and 
documented. 1 Cr. (0-3). Prerequisite or corequisite: ENT 116, ENT 153. 

ENT 161 

INTERMEDIATE DEVICES APPLICATIONS 

Construction and measurement of a variety of solid state devices and cir- 
cuits; extensive measurement techniques are employed to collect data. 
Emphasizes the presentation of collected data in technical report form 
using narrative and graphic techniques. 1 Cr. (0-3). Prerequisite or 
corequisite: ENT 121. 

ENT 162 

INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION CIRCUITS AND 

SYSTEMS 

Analysis of filter networks, impedance matching networks, resonant cir- 
cuits, oscillator circuits and frequency synthesis circuits. Transmission 
line and antenna theory is stressed. Noise as it affects circuit operation 
and a primer on vacuum tube theory as it applies to high power trans- 
mitter operation is studied. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: ENT 151, ENT 152. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: ENT 121. 

ENT 163 

COMMUNICATION CIRCUITS APPLICATIONS I 

Construction of communication circuits. Emphasizes RF measuring 
techniques. Problems associated with RF circuit prototyping are ex- 
plored. 1 Cr. (0-3). Prerequisite or corequisite: ENT 162. 

ENT 164 

DIGITAL CIRCUITS APPLICATIONS 

Construction of prototype logic circuits. Measurement of both static and 
dynamic characteristics. Proto Board and wire wrapping prototyping 
methods are introduced. 1 Cr. (0-3). Prerequisite or corequisite: ENT 127. 

ENT 241 

CALIBRATION AND STANDARDIZATION 

Principles of electronic instrument calibration and standardizing techni- 
ques. Instruments used in laboratory are calibrated according to the 
National Bureau of Standards. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

ENT 248 

ADVANCED CIRCUIT ANALYSIS 

State of the art devices and circuits, both analog and digital, are analyzed 
in detail to train students in advanced troubleshooting techniques. 3 Cr. 
(3-0). 

ENT 249 

INTRODUCTION TO MICROPROCESSORS 

An introduction to the Motorola 6800 family of microprocessors: the 
architecture, instruction set, and basic interface practices. 3 Cr. (3-0). 
Prerequisite: ENT 127 or permission of instructor. 



ENT 250 

INTERMEDIATE COMMUNICATION CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS 

A continuation of ENT 162. RF amplifiers, modulation techniques, mix- 
ing, multiplexing, receiver circuits, transmitter circuits, television theory 
and circuits are studied. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: ENT 162. 

ENT 251 

COMMUNICATIONS CIRCUITS APPLICATIONS II 

A continuation of ENT 163. Alignment, measurement, and calibration of 
communication systems. Measurement and analysis of modulated cir- 
cuits are explored. 1 Cr. (0-3). Prerequisite or corequisite: ENT 250. 

ENT 252 

LINEAR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS 

Operational amplifiers, regulators, comparators, converters and special- 
ized LIC's together with the associated circuitry to control and modify the 
characteristics of these devices. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: ENT 121. 

ENT 253 

LINEAR CIRCUITS APPLICATIONS 

Laboratory experience with a wide variety of linear integrated circuits. 
Measurement of these circuits and troubleshooting techniques are ex- 
plored. 1 Cr. (0-3). Prerequisite or corequisite: ENT 252. 

ENT 254 

MICROPROCESSOR APPLICATIONS I 

Lab experiments complement the coursework of ENT 249. Each student 
uses a microprocessor trainer to perform programming and interface ex- 
periments. 1 Cr. (0-3). Prerequisite or corequisite: ENT 249. 

ENT 255 

BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENTS 

Human electrical potentials and the transducers used for detecting these 
signals. Extensive coverage of equipment used to monitor the cardio- 
vascular, respiratory and nervous systems. Human physiology is included 
as required. Stresses patient safety measures for each piece of equipment 
studied. 3 Cr. (3-0). Not offered 1985-86. 

ENT 256 

COMPUTER PERIPHERAL MAINTENANCE 

Specialized examination of the theory of operation and maintenance pro- 
blems associated with floppy-disc systems, teleprinters, video terminals 
and other computer peripheral devices and systems. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prere- 
quisite: ENT 249 or permission of instructor. Not offered 1985-86. 

ENT 257 

COMPUTER PERIPHERAL MAINTENANCE LABORATORY 

Supervised work experience in the maintenance of computer peripheral 
equipment. Maintenance procedures are performed on a wide variety of 
computer peripherals. Mechanical, electrical and software diagnostic pro- 
cedures are employed. 1 Cr. (0-5). Additional credits may be earned on a 
ratio of five hours of work experience per week per semester per credit. 
Not offered 1985-86. 

ENT 258 

ADVANCED COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS 

An examination of the microwave components associated with satellite 
and point-to-point communication systems. Maintenance and 
troubleshooting methods used in communication systems are stressed. 3 
Cr. (3-0). Not offered 1985-86. 

ENT 259 

ADVANCED COMMUNICATION LABORATORY 

Microwave component experiments. Measurement of receiver front end 
temperatures, power measurements, VSWR measurements. Reception 
of geostationary satellites provides experience in problems associated 
with this type of communication. 1 Cr. (0-3). Not offered 1985-86. 



96 



ENT260 

SOFTWARE FOR MICROPROCESSORS 

An advanced course in the development of algorithms and machine 
language programs for the 6800 family of microprocessors. Emphasizes 
control and interface programs. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite or corequisite: 
ENT249. 

ENT261 

MICROPROCESSOR APPLICATIONS II 

Lab experiments will complement ENT 260. Each student will use an ET 
3400 microprocessor trainer to test and debug machine language pro- 
grams. 1 Cr. (0-3). Prerequisite or corequisite: ENT 260. 

ENT 262 

MICROPROCESSOR INTERFACING 

Shielding, grounding and transmission line techniques, bus interconnec- 
tions, memories, serial interfacing, parallel interfacing, magnetic- recor- 
ding techniques, and CRT controller design are studied in relation to their 
use in microprocessor interfacing. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite or corequisite: 
ENT 260. 

ENT 263 

MICROPROCESSOR APPLICATIONS III 

Lab experiments complement the coursework of ENT 262. Each student 
will use an ET 3400 trainer to perform a variety of interface experiments. 
Small computer systems will be used for advanced interface experiments. 
1 Cr. (0-3). Prerequisite or corequisite: ENT 262. 



ENGINEER IN TRAINING (EIT) 



EIT201 
STATICS 

The basic principles of statics: various force systems, static equilibrium of 
the force systems, friction and miscellaneous static related problems. The 
practical applications of these principles -analysis of roof and bridge 
trusses, beam under various loading conditions; belt friction and rolling 
resistance, flexible cables, etc. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

EIT 202 

STRENGTH OF MATERIALS I 

Outlines properties of engineering materials, behavior of materials under 
loads, stress and deformations, riveted and welded joints, torsion, cen- 
troids, moment of inertia, areas of shear and moments in beams, stresses 
in beams and design of beams. Students learn to analyze and design sim- 
ple beams, riveted and welded connections, shafts subjected to torsion, 
etc. 3Cr. (3-0). 

EIT 203 
DYNAMICS 

Basic principles of dynamics, i.e., kinematics of rectilinear motion, cur- 
vilinear motion, kinetics of motion, plane motion, and their effects on 
moving or static bodies. The application of these principles — the use of 
work, energy, power and impulse, momentum and impact concepts to 
solve various motion problems. 3 Cr. (3-0) . 

EIT 204 

FLUID MECHANICS 

Basic principles of fluid mechanics and their applications in practical fluid 
mechanics problems. Properties of fluids, fluid pressure at rest, buoyancy 
effect, steady flow of liquids in closed conduits, as well as in open chan- 
nels, losses in both cases, flow measuring devices, variable flow, forces 
produced by fluids in motion and dimensional analysis and similitudes. All 
equations of the fluid flow are derived from the basic Bernoulli equation. 
3Cr. (3-0). 



EIT 205 

STRENGTH OF MATERIALS II 

Continuation of Strength of Materials I. Covers complex problems such 
as deflection of beams by moment-area method, analysis of statically in- 
determinate beams by three moment equation and moment distribution 
methods, combined bending and axial stresses, analysis and design of 
timber, steel and aluminum columns and special topics of strain energy 
and impact loadings. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

EIT 206 

ENGINEERING ECONOMICS 

Study of economics in relation to engineering. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

EIT 207 

ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY 

An intensive course of chemical calculations based on chemical reactions 
and physical properties of substances. Includes theoretical topics needed 
for calculations. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

EIT 208 
THERMODYNAMICS 

Energy transfer in relation to changes in physical properties of 
substances. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

EIT 209 

ENGINEERING PHYSICS 

A study of physics as it relates to engineering. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

EIT 210 

ENGINEERING ELECTRONICS 

Fundamental principles of electrical circuit analysis are applied to EIT pro- 
blems. Includes Ohm's law, series circuits, parallel circuits, series-parallel 
circuits, network theorems, magnetism, electro-magnetic induction, 
alternating current and voltage inductance, inductive reactance, 
capacitance, capacitive reactance, capacitive circuits, alternating current 
circuits, complex numbers and resonance. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisites: 
algebra, trigonometry and basic calculus. 



ENGLISH (END 



ENL011 

BASIC ENGLISH 

This course emphasizes writing skills: organization, structure, content, 
style, and mechanics. Individualized instruction, instructor control of the 
writing process, limited class size, and personalization of grammar in- 
struction are characteristic of the course. 3 Institutional Cr. (3-0). This 
course may not replace any English requirement or elective in a program. 

ENL 111 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION I 

Basic composition — language structure, rhetorical principles, orderly, 
clear writing, and readings in expository prose. Offers the student a varie- 
ty of methods for use in developing his/her own written expression. 
Analysis, discussion, and practice of such methods as description, defini- 
tion, narration, comparison, classification and argumentation. The stu- 
dent uses writing to explain and explore, gaining experience in essential 
writing and research skills. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

ENL 121 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION II 

Continues the writing principles developed in ENL 1 1 1 . Includes the study 
of poetry, prose and drama. Emphasizes critical analysis and interpreta- 
tion of literature through discussion and written assignments. Through 
writing about literature and its themes, students examine the purpose, 
argument and style of literary writing. Students explore the importance of 
literature to society; study the impact of language upon the reader and 
apply the skills learned in ENL 1 1 1 . 3 Cr. (3-0) . Prerequisite: ENL 1 1 J. 



® 



ENL201 

TECHNICAL WRITING 

Intensive survey of technical writing with practice in preparing reports, in- 
structions, memos and other communication for business and industry. 
Students develop skills in analyzing audiences and writing for readers 
both with and without technical expertise. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: ENL 
111 or permission of instructor. 

ENL 202 

FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH 

Includes public speaking, its methods and evaluation, and the develop- 
ment of persuasive speech. The study of modern rhetorical theory in in- 
terpersonal and group dynamics; mass persuasion and non-verbal 
behavior. The student will participate as speaker in a variety of situations 
and roles, including conflict, mediation, support, and common ground. 3 
Cr. (3-0). 

ENL 231 

WORLD LITERATURE 

Students read literature which expresses the western belief in the para- 
mount importance of the individual. Surveys representative works of con- 
tinental Europe from classical Greek/ Roman periods to the present. 3 Cr. 
(3-0). Prerequisite: ENL 121 or permission of instructor. 

ENL 235 

CREATIVE WRITING 

Development of skills in writing imaginative prose. Students present 
short stories for class criticism and review. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: ENL 
111. 

ENL 250 

LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN 

A reading of the oral and written literature of Native Americans, with em- 
phasis on literature produced in North America. The works will be ap- 
proached through literary criticism, philosophy, religion, psychology, 
history, and social criticism. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

ENL 251 

MASTERS OF HORROR: HORROR IN LITERATURE AND THE 

MASS MEDIA 

A humanities elective exploring the serious treatment of "horror" by 
authors from the 17th century to modern times, including Shakespeare, 
Shelley, Poe, Lovecraft and Bradbury. Also examines the evolution of the 
pulps, the horror comic, the horror radio series and the horror film as 
forces that shape and mirror the mainstream of American social thought. 
3Cr. (3-0). 

ENL 252 

WOMEN IN LITERATURE 

A humanities elective exploring twentieth-century American literature 
written about women by women, including Gilman, Chopin, Plath, 
Porter, Oates, Walker, Welty. The course uses literature to examine the 
archetypes and stereotypes, from classical times to the present, that have 
shaped the ways women see themselves and the ways others view them. 
Also examines the treatment of women in cartoons, advertising, music 
and film to demonstrate how these genres maintain and/or alter the im- 
age of modern women. 3 Cr. (3-0) . 

ENL 290 

SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH 

Individual guidance in advanced studies. Admission by permission of the 
instructor. 1-3 Cr. (1 to 3-0). 



ENL 711 
COMMUNICATIONS 

Skills and competencies in basic technical writing and oral communica- 
tion to meet the needs of the applied arts certificate student. 3 Cr. (3-0). 
(With permission of instructor and upon demonstration of the appropriate 
writing skills, ENL 201 may be substituted for ENL 711. Course substitu- 
tion form must be filed if ENL 71 1 is required in the student's curriculum. 
See Integrated Studies Division Director.) 



ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (ESC) 



ESC 100 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

Designed especially for the non-science student who wants to unders- 
tand environmental systems and problems from a scientific viewpoint. 
Covers many aspects of energy, land, water, and air pollution and their 
effect on living organisms, especially people. 3 Cr. (3-0). 




FITNESS & LIFETIME SPORTS (PED) 



Fitness and Lifetime Sports requirements may be waived with permission 
of the Dean and the Director of Health Sciences if the student has been in 
the Armed Services for at least one year of active duty or if it is deter- 
mined that he/she should be excused because of age or physical condi- 
tion. 

PED 106 
TENNIS/BOWLING 

Tennis instruction for beginners and for those who wish to improve their 
skills in this lifetime sport. Instruction and practice in bowling fundamen- 
tals. Includes bowling skills, strategy, scoring and game courtesies. 1 Cr. 
(0-2). 

PED 107 
GOLF/BOWLING 

Instruction and practice in golf skills to prepare students to play and enjoy 
a round of golf. Instruction and practice in bowling fundamentals. In- 
cludes bowling skills, strategy, scoring and game courtesies. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 121 

SOCCER/ VOLLEYBALL/ BASKETBALL 

Instruction in soccer and basketball stressing basic skills, strategy, player 
positioning and game rules. Volleyball (a large muscle activity) instruction 
for beginners and those who wish to improve their playing skills. 1 Cr. 
(0-2). 

PED 122 
SOFTBALL/VOLLEYBALL/BASKETBALL 

Instruction and practice in the fundamental skills of softball. Volleyball in- 
struction for beginners and those who wish to improve their playing skills. 
Instruction in basketball stressing basic skills, strategy, player positioning 
and game rules. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 123 
FOOTBALL/VOLLEYBALL/BASKETBALL 

Instruction in touch football and volleyball (large muscle activities) for 
those who wish to learn or improve skills. Instruction in basketball stress- 
ing basic skills, strategy, player positioning and game rules. 1 Cr. (0-2). 



98 



PED 124 
BASKETBALL/VOLLEYBALL 

Instruction in basketball stressing basic skills, strategy, player positioning 
and game rules. Volleyball (a large muscle activity) instruction for begin- 
ners and those who wish to improve their playing skills. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 125 

WEIGHT TRAINING/ VOLLEYBALL/SOFTBALL 

A progressive developmental program using the Universal Gym in either a 
70 percent muscle building category (male) or a 50 percent muscle toning 
category (female). May include a cardio-vascular efficiency program in 
jogging, rope jumping or running in place. Volleyball (large muscle activi- 
ty) instruction for beginners and those who wish to improve their playing 
skills. Instruction and practice in the fundamental skills of softball. 1 Cr. 
(0-2). 

PED 141 

ARCHERY/ VOLLEYBALL 

Field archery is a fundamental course in target shooting emphasizing ac- 
curacy at close ranges. Volleyball (large muscle activity) instruction for 
beginners and those who wish to improve playing skills. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 142 

BADMINTON/ VOLLEYBALL 

Instruction in the fundamental skills of badminton (a lifetime sport). 
Volleyball (large muscle activity) instruction for beginners and those who 
wish to improve their playing skills. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 143 

WEIGHT TRAINING/VOLLEYBALL 

A progressive developmental program using the Universal Gym in either a 
70 percent muscle building category (male) or a 50 percent muscle toning 
category (female). May include a cardio-vascular efficiency program in 
jogging, rope jumping or running in place. Volleyball (large muscle activi- 
ty) instruction for beginners and those who wish to improve their playing 
skills. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 144 

WEIGHT TRAINING/GOLF 

A progressive developmental program using the Universal Gym in either a 
70 percent muscle building category (male) or a 50 percent muscle toning 
category (female). May include a cardio-vascular efficiency program in 
jogging, rope jumping or running in place. Instruction and practice in golf 
skills to prepare students to play and enjoy a round of golf. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 145 

ADAPTED P. E. /WEIGHT TRAINING 

An individualized course designed to meet the specific needs of the stu- 
dent with a physical handicap. Depending upon handicap, program may 
include a combination of appropriate individual sports and/or a self- 
development program such as Hatha Yoga or progressive general exer- 
cise. Weight training is a progressive developmental program using the 
Universal Gym in either a 70 percent muscle building category (male) or a 
50 percent muscle toning program (female). May include a cardio- 
vascular efficiency program in jogging, rope jumping or running in place. 
1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 146 
BOWLING/PHYSICAL FITNESS 

Instruction and practice in bowling fundamentals. Includes bowling skills, 
strategy, scoring and game courtesies. An individualized program to raise 
the student's level of physical fitness. The program may include exercise, 
jogging, bicycling, aerobic dance or weight training. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 147 

JOGGING/PHYSICAL FITNESS 

An individualized program of running designed to accommodate each 
student's needs and goals. An individualized program to raise the stu- 
dent's level of physical fitness. The program may include exercise, jogg- 
ing, bicycling, aerobic dance or weight training. 1 Cr. (0-2). 



PED 162 
GOLF 

Instruction and practice in golf skills to prepare students to play and enjoy 
a round of golf . 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 163 
GYMNASTICS 

Instruction in movement skills, combinations and sequences in free exer- 
cise, tumbling and on gymnastic apparatus. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PFD164 

INSTRUCTIONAL SWIMMING 

Designed to equip the non-swimmer with the basic water safety skills and 
knowledge needed for safety when in or near water. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 165 
LIFESAVING 

Covers knowledge and skills needed to meet the requirements for cer- 
tification in American Red Cross Advanced Lifesaving. 2Cr. (1-2). 

PED 166 
RACQUETBALL 

Instruction for beginners and for those who wish to improve skills in this 
lifetime activity. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 167 

ROLLER SKATING 

Instruction and practice in the fundamental skills needed to enjoy this 
sport. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 168 
YOGA 

Hatha Yoga is a self-discipline designed to increase the efficiency of all 
body systems. It stresses the reality of self-awareness and introduces 
relaxation as a way of life. The course stresses the practicing of asanas 
(postures) and the techniques for complete breathing and total body 
relaxation. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 169 
AEROBIC DANCE 

A vigorous physical fitness course combining locomotive movements for 
cardiovascular endurance, exercise for muscle tone and flexibility and 
basic dance steps for rhythmical development and coordination. The se- 
quences are performed to a variety of musical scores. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 170 
CANOEING 

Canoe safety, equipment, basic paddling techniques, and reading river 
conditions. 1 Cr. (0-2). 

PED 201 

PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH 

Discussions of up-to-date relevant information concerning personal and 
community health problems of today's college students. 2 Cr. (2-0) . 

PED 202 

RED CROSS STANDARD FIRST AID 

This course will cover the material of the "Standard First Aid and 
Personal Safety Program'' and the "Basic Life Support Course in 
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation" as set up by the American National Red 
Cross. It is an intermediate-level first aid course. 2 Cr. (2-0). 



® 



FLORICULTURE (FLR, OHT) 



FLR 121 

GREENHOUSE CROP PRODUCTION I 

An introduction to greenhouse crop production. Emphasizes en- 
vironmental control, plant culture, facilities, and equipment. Includes 
demonstration of techniques. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

FLR 122 

FLORAL DESIGN I 

Instruction in and application of principles in the art of floral design. In- 
cludes form, styles and composition. Covers designing floral arrange- 
ments, wreaths, sprays, baskets, bouquets, wedding flowers, and cor- 
sages. 3 Cr. (1-6). 

FLR 232 

GREENHOUSE CROP PRODUCTION II 

Production of cut flowers and potted plants. Emphasizes techniques used 
for important commercial crops. Students will grow crops in the College's 
greenhouses. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

FLR 233 

FLORAL DESIGN II 

A continuation of FLR 122. Covers designing dried and silk arrangements. 
Stresses shop layout and routine procedures in the operation of a flower 
shop. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisite: FLR 122. 

FLR 243 

GREENHOUSE CROP PRODUCTION III 

Production of potted plants, bedding plants, and other crops using com- 
mercial techniques. Includes production, planning, crop rotation, and the 
role of management. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

FLR 244 

FLOWER SHOP OPERATION 

Emphasizes buying, pricing, sales, inventory, personnel, record keeping, 
and general principles related to the commercial retail flower shop. Lab 
practice in perfecting design techniques and developing originality— em- 
phasizes wedding designs. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

FLR 245 

HOUSE AND CONSERVATORY PLANTS 

Identification, culture, propagation and use of house and conservatory 
foliage plants. Course includes artificial lighting, indoor landscaping for 
homes, malls and business, soils and fertilizers for commercial growing, 
insects, diseases, and cultivation problems associated with foliage plants. 
3 Cr. (2-3). 

OHT 114 
HORTICULTURE SOILS 

Study of soil texture, structure, organic matter, and plant nutrients as 
related to the use of lime and fertilizers. Includes synthetic soils and 
moisture-air relationships. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

OHT 115 

WOODY PLANTS I 

An introduction to the study of trees, shrubs and vines grown in nurseries 
for landscape purposes. The course stresses the identification and uses of 
woody plants. 2 Cr. (1-3). 

OHT 116 
HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

The classification, identification, and general culture of perennials, bulbs 
and roses. Practice in landscape use and design of flower borders. 3 Cr. 
(2-3). 



OHT 234 

PLANT PROPAGATION 

Theory and practice of plant propagation by sexual and asexual means — 
applications in floriculture production, nursery production, and forestry. 3 
Cr. (2-3). 

OHT 239 

PLANT INSECTS ft DISEASES 

The insects and diseases of horticulture crops. The nature, structure, 
growth habits, harmful effects, and control of insects and related forms. 
The most common and harmful plant diseases are studied for identifica- 
tion and control. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisite: BIO 1 1 1. 

OHT 246 

HORTICULTURE MECHANICS 

Operation and maintenance of horticulture equipment. Includes small 
gasoline engines, electric motors, electrical fans, environmental controls, 
and other soil working and irrigation equipment. 3 Cr. (2-3). 



FOOD AND HOSPITALITY (FHD) 



(100) 



FHD 111 
INTRODUCTORY FOODS 

Study and application of the basic scientific concepts related to food 
preparation. Emphasizes knowledge of basic ingredients and the produc- 
tion and evaluation of quality food products. Includes orientation to the 
food service industry, study of advances in food technology and practice 
in using the grill, fryer and microwave. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

FHD 112 
NUTRITION 

Sources and functions of nutrients and how they relate to body func- 
tions. Essentials of an optimum diet. Includes nutritive requirements for 
each stage of the life cycle. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

FHD 113 

FIELD EXPERIENCE IN MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS I (8 weeks) 

Introductory hospital and dietary experience. Includes orientation to a 
hospital and work experience in dietary office practice, food preparation, 
beltline service, and patient visitations. 1 Cr. (0-6). (32 Clinical Hours). 

FHD 114 

INTRODUCTION TO FOOD SERVICE ADMINISTRATION AND 

MEDICAL CARE ORGANIZATIONS 

Organization and management of a dietary unit. The role of the techni- 
cian and working relationships with other health care professionals. 
Federal, state and local food handling regulations. Examination of total 
health care systems, organizational structure, medical records, laws, and 
ethics. 2 Cr. (2-0). 

FHD 115 

PURCHASING, STORAGE, AND SANITATION 

Managerial training in all facets of purchasing. Correct procedures for 
good storage and sanitation. Training staff in correct procedures to 
assure production of safe food. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

FHD 121 

QUANTITY FOOD PREPARATION 

Menu planning, purchasing, preparation, and service of food in quantity. 
Emphasizes safe and efficient use of quantity food preparation equip- 
ment, cooking with steam and deep fat, meats, and production manage- 
ment. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisites: FHD 1 1 1 or permission of instructor. 

FHD 122 

DIET THERAPY WITH DIETETIC SEMINAR 

In-depth study of principles of therapeutic diets. Includes medical ter- 
minology, tours of community health services, and familiarity with diet 
manuals. Students learn interviewing, counseling techniques and sources 
for professional updating. Seminar includes study of specific therapeutic 
cases. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: FHD 1 12. 



FHD 123 

FIELD EXPERIENCE IN MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS II 

Students work in the dietary department in areas related to the subjects 
they are studying. Six hour lab periods rotate between quantity food pro- 
duction, menu and cost control, and diet therapy. Students meet with 
the dietitian supervisor one hour a week to discuss unanswered questions 
and learning experiences. 3 Cr. (1-6). Prerequisite: FHD 113. 

FHD 125 

MENU PLANNING AND COST CONTROL 

Techniques of planning nutritious meals for commercial establishments 
and institutions; the printed menu; controlling costs through good menu 
planning and other techniques. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

FHD 126 

FRONT OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND HOUSEKEEPING 

Introduction to hotel and motel management. Managing a front office — 
includes promotion, guest registration, and cost control; management of 
the housekeeping department. Includes supervised work experience at 
area hotels and motels. 3 Cr. (2-31. Offered every other year in the spring 
term. 

FHD 201 

ADVANCED QUANTITY FOODS 

Cooking foods in quantity. Emphasizes advanced skills of food prepara- 
tion, ordering and receiving, individual learning objectives. Will 
strengthen areas in which student needs help. 2 Cr. (0-61 . Prerequisite: 
FHD 121. 

FHD 231 

FIELD EXPERIENCE IN MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS IV 

Students train in kitchen and geriatric therapeutics in a nursing home. 
Emphasizes personnel management, hiring, training, and record keep- 
ing. 3 Cr. ( 1 -6) . Prerequisite: FHD 250. 

FHD 234 

HEALTH CARE DELIVERY SYSTEMS 

In-depth study of the health care programs available to the public. Pre- 
sent problems and future directions of health care institutions and the 
medical profession. Includes factors that consumers of health care ser- 
vices should know about in order to avoid fads and quacks. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

FHD 235 

PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT, WORK SIMPLIFICATION 

Management techniques, interpersonal relationships, motivations, 
manual motions, work place layout, production job analysis and evalua- 
tion. Establishing work loads. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

FHD 236 

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT AND THEORY 

Supervised practical experience in various areas of food and hospitality 
management and production. Lecture and discussion cover work 
schedules, employer-employee relations, food purchasing and prepara- 
tion, personnel supervision and training, menu planning and other sub- 
jects related to the student's choice of practicum. 2 Cr. (1-5). 

FHD 241 

BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT AND CATERING 

Techniques of restaurant management. Includes all types of beverages 
and bar management. Management of the catered meal. Preparation and 
presentation of classic and international cuisines. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisite: 
FHD 121 or work experience in food prepara tion for a varied menu. 

FHD 242 

FIELD EXPERIENCE IN MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS V 

Management in various nutrition programs. Students work in a school, 
with feeding groups of the aged, and in a five-meal-a-day hospital pro- 
gram which emphasizes renal and cancer patients. 3 Cr. (1-6). Prere- 
quisite: FHD 231. 



FHD 245 

EQUIPMENT AND LAYOUTS 

Familiarizes students with current types of equipment and ways to lay out 
facilities for best production, service, safety, and sanitation. 3 Cr. (3-0). 
Prerequisite: FHD 12 1, or commercial or institutional work experience. 

FHD 246 

HOSPITALITY MERCHANDISING 

Sales, merchandising and promotion techniques are applied to food and 
lodging establishments. Each student does an in-depth feasibility study 
on a possible investment — includes financing and merchandising. 3 Cr. 
(3-0). 

FHD 250 

HOSPITALITY, DIETETIC WORK EXPERIENCE (MANAGEMENT 

SYSTEMS III) 

Prior to the beginning of the fourth semester a work experience of 120 
hours is required. Dietetic Technician students work in an institutional 
dietary department under a registered dietitian. Food and Hospitality 
students work in the food and hospitality industry. Students are 
evaluated by employer/supervisor, submit a written report, and discuss 
their experience with the instructor. 1 Cr. (120 Clinical Hours). Prere- 
quisite for Dietetic Technician Program: FHD 123. 



FOREST TECHNOLOGY (FOR) 



FOR 111 
DENDROLOGY 

Classification, identification, and distribution of woody plants in the 
United States. Emphasizes species of local commercial importance. 3 Cr. 
(2-3). 

FOR 113 

FOREST MENSURATION 

Measurement of standing trees, of logs and other cut wood products. 
Calculating the contents of these products in terms of board feet, cubic 
feet, cords, and pounds. Measuring growth in trees and forests. 3 Cr. 
(2-3). 

FOR 115 

FOREST BOTANY 

The study of plant physiology and anatomy with special reference to 
trees. The stem structure of trees and the identification of commercial 
tree species based on microscopic characteristics of wood. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

FOR 121 

PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND FOREST SURVEYING I 

The basic techniques of photogrammetrv (the use of photographs in 
surveying and forest measurement), photo interpretation; introduction to 
surveying, including the fundamentals of plane surveying and the use and 
care of equipment. 3 Cr. (1-6). 

FOR 124 

ADVANCED FOREST MENSURATION 

Determining the quality of logs and trees. Estimating volumes of large 
timber areas by different sampling techniques. The use and interpretation 
of aerial photos in forest surveys. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

FOR 126 

FOREST ECOLOGY AND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 

Introduction to ecology, upon which the management of forest and 

wildlife resources may be based. Improves the student's understanding of 

the ecological relationship of forest and wildlife communities. 3 Cr. (2-3). 



101 



FOR 232 

FOREST SURVEYING II 

Theory and practice of plane surveying techniques used in property and 
boundary surveys, map making, construction surveys, and computa- 
tions. Emphasizes the use of these techniques in forestry. 3 Cr. (2-3). 
Prerequisite: FOR 121. 

FOR 233 

EQUIPMENT AND MACHINERY 

The operation, care and maintenance of logging machinery, forest fire 
control equipment and related mechanical devices commonly used in 
forest operations. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

FOR 234 

TIMBER HARVESTING 

Cutting trees. Skidding and moving timber from the woods to the point of 
manufacture. Modern logging methods and techniques. Includes cutting 
tree stems into lengths and units of highest economic value. 3 Cr. (2-3) . 

FOR 236 
SILVICULTURE 

Forestry practices and systems used to grow and manage trees and 
forests for the sustained production of timber products. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

FOR 242 

FOREST PRODUCTS 

Converting round timber products into a semi-finished state. The 
manufacturing process of changing these raw materials into finished con- 
sumer products. Includes seasoning lumber and preservative treatments 
of wood to improve its usefulness. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

FOR 247 

FOREST LAND MANAGEMENT AND RECREATION 

Basic concepts of managing publicly and privately owned forest lands 
used for more than one purpose (for example, recreation and logging). 
Shows the importance of managing the land for recreation, wildlife, and 
water. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

FOR 248 

FOREST PROTECTION 

The causes and effects of forest fires. Methods used to control forest 
fires. The identification, effects and control of other harmful agents, 
principally insects and diseases. 3 Cr. (3-0). 




GEOGRAPHY (GEO) 



GEO 101 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 

Introduction to the fundamentals of geography — maps, mapping, land, 
water, soil, vegetation, atmosphere, climate. Covers the relationship bet- 
ween physical and human environment. 3 Cr. (3-0). 



GEOLOGY (GEL) 



GEL 105 

PHYSICAL GEOLOGY 

Basic concepts in the study of the Earth. Relationships between Earth 
materials and the geologic agents and processes that create and modify 
minerals, rocks, landforms, continents, and the ocean basins. 4 Cr. (3-3). 



102 



GEL 106 

HISTORICAL GEOLOGY 

Origin of the Earth, evolution of its crust, and the development and evolu- 
tion of life. Relationships among rock units as evidence for geologic 
history; fossils as documents of evolution, chronology and environment; 
relative and absolute age dating of the Earth. 4 Cr. (3-3) . 

GEL 290 

SPECIAL STUDIES IN GEOLOGY 

Special attention to particular abilities and interests of students. 
Individual guidance in advanced studies. Admission by permission of the 
instructor. (1-3, laboratory as required). 



GERMAN (GER) 



GER111 

BEGINNING GERMAN I 

Basic grammar and language structure. Comprehension, speaking and 
reading, with the emphasis on pronunciation and accent. 3 Cr. (3-0). 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

GER 121 

BEGINNING GERMAN II 

Continuation of GER 1 1 1 . 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: GER 1 1 1. 



GOVERNMENT (GOV) 



GOV 231 

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT- NATIONAL 

Federal government, its powers and organization. Functions of 
legislative, executive and judicial branches. Students examine the 
historical development of our federal system and analyze the relationships 
between social forces, government and political action. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

GOV 241 

STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

State and local government institutions, their functions and respon- 
sibilities; intergovernmental relations. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

GOV 290 

SPECIAL STUDIES IN GOVERNMENT 

Special attention to particular abilities and interests of students. 
Individual guidance in advanced studies. Admission by permission of the 
instructor. 1-3 Cr. (1 to 3-0). 



GRAPHIC ARTS (GCO) 



GC0 511 

LAYOUT AND DESIGN 

Materials, tools and techniques used in preparation of copy for reproduc- 
tion; paste-up and color separation overlays. 4 Cr. (2-6). 

GCO 512 

TYPOGRAPHIC COMPOSITION 

Fundamentals of typesetting. Theory and practice in the care and use of 
composing (typesetting) machines, both hot and cold (mechanical) and 
cold (photo). 4 Cr. (2-6). 

GCO 515 

LAYOUT AND DESIGN 

For students enrolled in programs other than Graphic Arts. Materials, 
tools and techniques used in preparation of copy for reproduction; paste- 
up and color separation overlays. 3 Cr. (2-3). 



GC0 516 

TYPOGRAPHIC COMPOSITION 

For students enrolled in programs other than Graphic Arts. Fundamentals 
of typesetting. Theory and practice in the care and use of composing 
(typesetting) machines, both hot and cold (mechanical) and cold (photo). 
3Cr. (2-3). 

GC0 521 

PROCESS CAMERA 

Darkroom procedures for reproducing line and halftone copy using pro- 
cess cameras. 4 Cr. (2-6) . 

GC0 522 

FILM ASSEMBLY AND IMPOSITION 

Study and application of various methods for assembling negatives and 
positives to create flats (preparation for making offset plates). 4 Cr. (2-6). 

GC0 525 

PROCESS CAMERA 

For students in programs other than Graphic Arts. Darkroom procedures 
for reproducing line and halftone copy using process cameras. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

GC0 526 

FILM ASSEMBLY AND IMPOSITION 

For students in programs other than Graphic Arts. Study and application 
of various methods for assembling negatives and positives to create flats 
(preparation for making offset plates). 3 Cr. (2-3). 

GCO 631 

PLATEMAKING. SUBSTRATES AND FINISHING 

Identification, selection, and relationship of paper and board stocks. Non- 
printing conversions for the printing, publishing, and allied industries. 
Theory and applications related to the various types of offset plates and 
processing procedures. 4 Cr. (2-6). 

GCO 632 

PRESS OPERATIONS 

Printing press operation. Ink mixing and matching, registration; preven- 
tive maintenance for quality analysis. 4 Cr. (2-6). 

GCO 635 

PRINTING ESTIMATING PRACTICES 

Theory and practice in estimating job costs, writing specifications and 
planning jobs for production. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

GCO 641 

ADVANCED TYPOGRAPHIC COMPOSITION 

Continuation of GCO 511 and GCO 512. Emphasizes photo composition 
as it relates to the composition industry. Students will do individual pro- 
jects and/or live work. 3 Cr. (1-6). Prerequisites: GCO 511, GC0512. 

GCO 642 

ADVANCED PROCESS CAMERA AND STRIPPING 

Advanced study in black and white tone reproduction, special effects and 
basic color procedures. Advanced work in color stripping and photo-art 
techniques. 3 Cr. (1-6). Prerequisites: GCO 521, GCO 522. 

GCO 645 

PRINTING PROCESSES 

Theory and application of the four major printing processes: letterpress, 
lithography, gravure, and silk screen. 3 Cr. (1-6). 



HISTORY (HIS) 



HIS 111 

WESTERN CIVILIZATION I 

Survey and analysis of major intellectual, social, political, and economic 
developments of western civilization — from ancient times until the eigh- 
teenth century. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

HIS 121 

WESTERN CIVILIZATION II 

Survey and analysis of major intellectual, social, political, and economic 
developments of western civilization — from the eighteenth century until 
the present. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

HIS 203 

CIVIL WAR HISTORY 

A history elective designed for anyone having either a general or specific 
interest in the American Civil War. The subject is studied through slide 
tours of the Eastern battlefields, a review of available print materials and 
through research projects. Topics include the general history of the war, 
an examination of soldier life, prisons and hospitals, sources for research, 
recruitment and training. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

HIS 231 

UNITED STATES-SURVEY I 

Political, economic, and social development of the United States from 
colonial times through the Civil War and Reconstruction Period. 3 Cr. 
(3-0). 

HIS 241 

UNITED STATES-SURVEY II 

Political, economic, and social development of the United States from 
1877 up to and including the Civil Rights Movement. 3Cr. (3-0). 

HIS 290 

SPECIAL STUDIES IN HISTORY 

Individual guidance in advanced studies. Admission by permission of the 
instructor. 1-3 Cr. (1 to 3-0). 



HUMAN SERVICE (HSR) 



HSR 111 

INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICE 

Examines the range of human problems and the programs and systems 
designed to help individuals address problems. Students explore the roles 
they might assume as human service workers. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

HSR 121 

HELPING PROCESS AND CRISIS INTERVENTION 

Designed to familiarize students with the fundamental techniques involv- 
ed in interviewing and crisis intervening in human service practice. 3 Cr. 
(3-0) . Prerequisite: HSR 111 orPSYIU. 

HSR 125 

FUNDAMENTALS OF COUNSELING 

Refines students' interviewing skills and develops skills in group work, 
behavior modification, decision making, relaxation therapy, assertiveness 
training and other counseling techniques. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: HSR 
111 orPSYIU. 



103 



HSR 240 

MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION IN HUMAN SERVICES 

Develops students' understanding of planning, evaluation, management, 
community relations and other activities which affect the operation of a 
human service agency. Focuses on the special needs, such as fund 
raising, of non-profit agencies. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: HSR 111 or work 
experience in the human service field. 

HSR 251 

HUMAN SERVICE PRACTICUM I 

Practicum courses are field work experiences held under Cooperative 
Education guidelines. These internship experiences allow students to 
learn through actual work in a human service agency. Students will work 
alongside professionals, study the agency in which they work, and relate 
theory to actual practice. 3 Cr. 

HSR 252 

HUMAN SERVICE PRACTICUM II 

Field work experiences held under Cooperative Education guidelines. See 
HSR 251 for additional information. 3 Cr. 

HSR 260 

HUMAN SERVICE SEMINAR 

By studying a particular problem or population, students learn how 
theory and skill are applied in a specific setting. Seminar courses are plan- 
ned for such areas as gerontology, drug and alcohol counseling, child 
care and child development, mental health/mental retardation and other 
similar areas. Professionals from the field and visitations will, in many 
cases, supplement classroom learning. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

HSR 261 through HSR 279 will focus on specific seminar topics. Each 
seminar will be 3 Cr. (3-0). 



INDUSTRIAL DRAFTING (IND) 



IND714 

BASIC DRAFTING (8 weeks) 

Introduction to industrial drawing; lettering; geometric drawing; or- 
thographic projections; pictorial projections; sectioning; dimensioning; 
auxiliary views; revolutions; sketching; reproduction processes; threads 
and fasteners. 5 Cr. (3-21). 

IND715 

MACHINE DRAFTING (8 weeks) 

Making accurate detail drawings based on complex industrial machine 
parts. Assembly and sub-assembly drawing based on industrial layouts. 
Applying close tolerance dimensioning; geometric tolerancing; true posi- 
tion dimensioning. Surface finish specifications which conform to in- 
dustrial and military standards. 5 Cr. (3-21 ) . Prerequisite: IND 714. 

IND 724 

GEARS, CAMS, AND MECHANISMS (8 weeks) 

Study of power transmission, pulleys, gears, sprockets, applied with 
mechanisms used to create motion in machines through linkage. 5 Cr. 
(3-21 ). Prerequisite: IND 714. 

IND 725 

SHEET METAL AND PIPING (8 weeks) 

A study of sheet metal intersections and developments; cones; transition 
pieces. Connection of skewed position openings with irregular shaped 
duct. A comprehensive study of piping systems and piping layout draw- 
ings. 5Cr. (3-21). Prerequisite: IND 714. 



104 



IND834 

CIVIL DRAFTING (8 weeks) 

Students make and use maps. Plotting traverses from field notes; 

gathering surveying information; drawing contour maps. 5 Cr. (3-21). 

Prerequisite: IND 714. 

IND 835 

STRUCTURAL DRAFTING (8 weeks) 

Students make shop drawings based on the original concept of a struc- 
ture as conceived by the architect or engineer. Includes detailed instruc- 
tions for punching, assembling, bolting, riveting, and welding. Basic 
types of loads and stresses are emphasized. 5 Cr. (3-21 ). Prerequisite: IND 
714. 

IND 844 

ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING (8 weeks) 

Residential housing — dining rooms, bedrooms, living rooms, baths, kit- 
chens. Identifying the components of house construction; stair layouts; 
doors; windows; fireplaces; structural members and loading; working 
drawings. 5 Cr. (3-21 ). Prerequisite: IND 714. 

IND 845 

ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC DRAFTING (8 weeks) 

Practical applications of drafting in the field of electrical construction — 
both domestic and commercial uses. House diagrams with circuit 
schematics, wiring diagrams and developing bills of materials. Types of 
electronic diagrams, symbols, reference designations and identification 
of essential parts. National Electric Code will be explored and applied. 5 
Cr. (3-21). Prerequisite: IND 714. 




JOURNALISM (JOU) 



JOU111 

NEWS WRITING 

Techniques of basic news writing for print media and covering a com- 
munity or in-house news beat. Emphasis on organizing information and 
rewriting to develop skills. Detailed critiques and class discussion of stu- 
dent writing. Introduction to the video system of writing. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

JOU 114 

MASS MEDIA PHOTOGRAPHY 

Introduction to photography with an adjustable camera and auxiliary 
equipment. Emphasizes techniques for producing black and white photos 
for news and related mass media. Students develop skills related to 
lighting, imaginative posing, action, and in-camera cropping. Course 
assumes no previous experience. Students must furnish camera. 3 Cr. 
(3-0). 

JOU 121 

REPORTING PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

Development of news writing skills through class assignments and news 
beat coverage. Emphasis on deadlines and tight thorough writing. Focus 
on public events reporting in practicum and in the field. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prere- 
quisite: JOU 111. 

JOU 122 

INTRODUCTORY NEWSPAPER PRODUCTION 

Beat reporting and writing for student publications and/ or the College's 
information services under deadline pressure. Introduction to organiza- 
tional responsibilities and management through reportorial team 
assignments or committee assignments. Includes basics of mechanical 
production and publication planning. Continued use of video writing. 2 
Cr. (0-6). Prerequisite: JOU 111. 



JOU231 

FEATURE WRITING 

Survey of news features including brites, color stories, sidebars, and per- 
sonality sketches. Introduction to related writing for pamphlets, 
brochures, in-depth reports and magazine fillers. Techniques of inter- 
viewing and research. Writing with goal of publication for pay. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

JOU 232 

COPYREADING AND EDITING 

Preparing material for publication with consideration for legal and ethical 
standards. Judicious editing of both traditional and video copy, 
copyreading, headline writing, picture editing, typography, layout and 
planning relative to print media production. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisites: JOU 
111 and JOU 121, orGC0515, orGC0511, or permission of the instructor. 

JOU 233 

NEWSPAPER MANAGEMENT AND PRODUCTION 

Experience in a responsible, managerial position with student publica- 
tions or in College information services. Focus on development of skill in 
news judgment, planning, and production. Students must have 
demonstrated ability to complete assignments with minimal supervision. 
Students must coordinate individualized instructional consultations. 2 Cr. 
(0-6). Prerequisite: JOU 122. 

JOU 244 

PUBLICATION MANAGEMENT 

Strengthens skills developed in Newspaper Management and Production. 
In addition to on-going use of skills, the course requires planning, staffing 
and production of cost-conscious medium for a pre-designated audience. 
2Cr. (0-6). Prerequisites: JOU 232, JOU 233. 




LIGHT DUTY DIESEL SERVICE (LDD) 



LDD611 

SHOP AND ENGINE PRINCIPLES (8 weeks) 

Includes the basics of precision mechanical measurement, basic fasten- 
ing devices and fittings, operating principles and theories of basic engine 
components and lubricants. 6 Cr. (6-18). 

LDD 612 

ENGINE COMPONENTS (8 weeks) 

Theory of operation and design of diesel engine with special emphasis on 
diesel engine components and accessories. 6 Cr. (6-18). 

LDD 621 

ENGINE DIAGNOSIS AND SERVICE (8 weeks) 

Careful study of diesel engine removal procedures. Basic principles of 
engine and cylinder head service with emphasis on induction and exhaust 
system service. 6 Cr. (6-18). 

LDD 622 

FUEL SYSTEMS (8 weeks) 

Introduction to the theory and function of fuel injection and pumping 
systems. Maintenance, inspection and troubleshooting techniques of 
combustion chambers and fuel system service. 6Cr. (6-18). 




MACHINE TOOL TECHNOLOGY AND 
MACHINIST GENERAL (MTT) 



MTT511 

MACHINING I (8 weeks) 

Use of hand tools to produce layouts and objects by hand. Simple filing, 
sawing, and assembly techniques. Use of drill presses, drill sharpening; 
drilling to a layout, drill jigs. Producing parallel and square surfaces, shap- 
ing rectangular objects. 5 Cr. (5-15). 

MTT 512 

MACHINING II (8 weeks) 

The theory of grinding tool bits: turning, facing, taper turning, boring and 

thread cutting on the lathe. Practice in end milling, slab and plain milling. 

5Cr. (5-15). 

MTT 521 

AUTOMATIC MACHINES (8 weeks) 

Fundamental concepts of metal removal using multi-tooling machining 
processes. Use and care of carbide tooling to obtain maximum effort. 
Emphasizes turret lathes, automatic screw machines, automatic power 
tapping machines. 5 Cr. (5-15). 

MTT 522 

INDUSTRIAL METROLOGY (8 weeks) 

The use of precision instruments such as verniers, various types of com- 
parators, Rockwell hardness testing, toolmakers scope. Testing for 
flatness of surface, surface plate work — includes the use of the sine bar, 
advanced blueprint reading, introduction to metric measurements, and 
quality control using the sampling method. 5 Cr. (5-15). 

MTT 631 

TOOLING TECHNOLOGY I (8 weeks) 

Theory and practice in machining. Cutting and assembling precision die 
parts, layout and boring to close tolerance in jigs and fixtures. 
Background theory and practice in machining different types of threads; 
application of threads. 5Cr. (5-15). 

MTT 632 

TOOLING TECHNOLOGY II (8 weeks) 

Background theory and practice in programming and operating 
numerically controlled machining center types of machines. Machining 
and terminology of gears, power transmission and indexing methods, 
simple, differential and helical milling. 5 Cr. (5-15). 

MTT 641 

ABRASIVE MACHINING (8 weeks) 

Theory and practice in surface, cylindrical, internal, and jig grinding. 
Grinding threads, taps, electrical chemical grinding, and electrical 
discharge machining. 5 Cr. (5-15). 

MTT 642 

HEAT TREATMENT AND CUTTER GRINDING (8 weeks) 

Theory and practice in hardening and tempering various kinds of metal. 
Carburizing, case hardening, annealing, normalizing, and forging of steel. 
Includes grinding of all types of tools and cutters. 5 Cr. 15-15). 



® 



MASS COMMUNICATIONS (MCM) 



MCM 111 

INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION 

A basic survey course which examines the many different mass media, in- 
cluding newspapers, magazines, radio, television, motion pictures, book 
publishing, and the recording industry. Examines such areas as advertis- 
ing in commercial media, photography and photojournalism, mass media 
news, networks, syndicates, cable, satellite communications, legal issues 
in the working press, regulatory control of the mass media, the audience 
and the effects of mass communication. Includes a glossary of media 
terms. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

MCM 122 

MEDIA AND LAW 

Concentrated survey of mass media and its relationship to the law. In- 
cludes intense examination of libel, slander, right to privacy, privilege, 
provisions of the First Amendment, etc. Considers precedent-setting 
court rulings and ongoing case histories. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

MCM 242 

MEDIA MANAGEMENT AND COMMUNITY RESPONSIBILITY 

This advanced course studies the commercial media in the U.S. as an in- 
dividual business serving a specific community or market. Includes the 
function of the media plant as a competitive, small or medium-sized 
business in the marketplace. Covers ethical considerations inherent in the 
communication business. Topics are discussed and evaluated in class and 
applied through case studies. Students apply skills through designing a 
small-market media plant. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

MCM 243 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

A basic course which surveys specialized writing and techniques and the 
use of a range of media (print, electronic) for disseminating information 
to particular audiences, including in-house groups. Includes practical 
study of news releases, house organs and other public relations vehicles. 
Students apply principles and techniques in simulated or actual projects. 
3Cr. (3-0). 



MATHEMATICAL COMPUTER SCIENCE (MCS) 



MCS 111 

THEORY OF PROGRAMMING I 

Introduction to programming. Topics include computer configuration, 
operating systems, algorithm design and development, loop structure, 
decision making, data types, subprograms, global and local variables, 
memory allocation, arrays. A higher level language (such as Pascal, FOR- 
TRAN, BASIC, etc.) will be used. Applications will be studied through 
laboratory experience on microcomputers. 4 Cr. (3-3). Corequisite: MTH 
238. 

MCS 121 

THEORY OF PROGRAMMING II 

Advanced programming techniques. Topics include structured program- 
ming, stepwise refinement, style, debugging, control structures, file 
structures, searching, sorting and merging. A second higher level 
language will be introduced. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisite: MCS 111. 

MCS 201 

DATA STRUCTURES 

Representation of data and algorithms associated with data structures. 
Topics include representation of arrays, strings, dense lists, linked lists, 
multi-linked lists, queues, stacks, deques, trees, graphs and files and the 
operations of sorting, searching, insertion, deletion and hashing. 4 Cr. 
(3-3). Prerequisite: MCS 121. 



106 



MCS 202 

MACHINE LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING 

Principles of machine language programming. Topics include computer 
organization, representation of numbers, strings, arrays and list struc- 
tures at the machine level, interrupt programming, linking loaders, and 
operating system interfaces. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisite: MCS 121. 



MATHEMATICS (MTH) 



MTH 001 
ARITHMETIC 

Presents the basic concepts and skills of arithmetic to prepare students 
for required mathematics courses. Post-tests are used to insure mastery 
of units covered. 3 Institutional Cr. (3-0). 

MTH 002 

BASIC ALGEBRA 

Basic skills and concepts of arithmetic and algebra are presented based 
on the students' aptitudes and needs. Post-tests are used to insure 
mastery of units covered. More than one semester may be required for 
mastery of the objectives. 3 Institutional Cr. (3-0). 

MTH 101 

INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICS I 

Exploration of number and geometric patterns. Problem solving, 
mathematical recreations, flow charts, sets, logic, systems of numera- 
tion. Introduction to algebra and other selected topics. A general educa- 
tion course for non-mathematics and non-science majors. 3 Cr. (3-0). 
Prerequisite: One year of high school mathematics. 

MTH 102 

INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICS II 

Probability, statistics, selected topics from geometry, number systems, 
and other selected topics. A general education course for non- 
mathematics and non-science majors. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: MTH 101. 

MTH 103 

COLLEGE ALGEBRA & TRIGONOMETRY I 

Properties of real numbers, basic algebraic operations, relations and func- 
tions, equations and inequalities, basic right triangle trigonometry, sine 
and cosine laws. Designed for general studies and technology students 
who need a thorough precalculus algebra background. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prere- 
quisite: Two years of high school algebra, and MTH 002 or MTH 105, or 
placement by examination. 

MTH 104 

COLLEGE ALGEBRA & TRIGONOMETRY II 

Continuation of MTH 103. Circular, trigonometric, inverse, exponential, 
and logarithmic functions, complex numbers, polar coordinates, deter- 
minants, systems of equations, linear inequalities and other selected 
topics. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: MTH 103 or placement by examination. 

MTH 105 

INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 

Skills and concepts of polynomials, equations and formulas, ratio and 
proportion, variation, systems of linear equations, factoring, quadratic 
equations, trigonometry and other selected topics. For associate degree 
automotive students. 3 Cr. (3-0). Cannot be used to satisfy General 
Studies requirements. Cannot be used as an elective credit in programs 
requiring MTH 103. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or place- 
ment by mathematics exam. 

MTH 107 

APPLIED CALCULUS 

Relations and functions, conies, limits, derivatives and integration of 
algebraic functions. Trigonometric functions and transcendental func- 
tions, methods of integration and applied problem solving. Excellent 
preparation for students who intend to sit for the Engineer in Training Ex- 
amination. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: College algebra and trigonometry or 
permission of instructor. 



MTH 201 

ELEMENTARY STATISTICS I 

Introduction to frequently applied statistical methods — descriptive 
statistics, frequency distributions, elementary probability, binomial, nor- 
mal and t-distributions, Central Limit Theorem, tests of hypotheses, con- 
fidence intervals, regression and correlation, and other topics as time per- 
mits. For general studies and technology students who need a basic 
working knowledge of statistics. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: One year of high 
school algebra. 

MTH 202 

ELEMENTARY STATISTICS II 

Continuation of MTH 201. Emphasizes applied statistical techniques and 
design of experiment; Student T, Chi-square, F-tests, linear regression, 
correlation, and models; analysis on enumerative data; analysis of 
variance; non-parametric statistics. Offered regularly in the spring terms 
of even numbered years. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: MTH 201 or permission 
of instructor. 

MTH 203 

STATISTICS WITH COMPUTER METHODS 

Introduction to frequently applied statistical methods with emphasis on 
computer models and solutions. Topics include statistical models, 
statistical inference, distributions, probability and random variables. 3 Cr. 
(3-0). Prerequisite: MCS 111. 

MTH 204 

MATRIX ALGEBRA 

Matrices, determinants, inverse of a matrix, rank and equivalence, linear 
equations and linear dependence, vector spaces, linear transformations, 
characteristic equations of a matrix, bilinear, quadratic, and Hermintian 
forms. Recommended for computer science, science, and technology 
students. May be used as a core requirement or general elective for 
general studies students. Offered regularly in the spring terms of odd 
numbered years. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: Two years of high school 
algebra, MTH 103, or permission of instructor 

MTH 237 

DISCRETE MATHEMATICS 

Introduction to discrete structures. Topics include logic and proof, sets, 
combinatorics, graphs, modeling, homomorphisms, boolean algebra, 
logic networks, coding theory, finite state machines and computability, 
formal languages and general algebraic structures emphasizing semi- 
groups, monoids and groups. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: MTH 238, or per- 
mission of instructor. 

MTH 238 
CALCULUS I 

Algebra review. Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, velocity, rates 
of change, chain rule, curve sketching, related rates, maximum- 
minimum theorems, differentials, applications, antiderivatives. 4 Cr. 
(4-0). Prerequisite: MTH 103 and MTH 104, or placement by math exam, 
or permission of instructor. 

MTH 248 
CALCULUS II 

Continuation of MTH 238. Emphasizes the definite integral, applications 
of integration, transcendental functions, techniques of integration, and 
other selected topics. 4 Cr. (4-0) Prerequisite: MTH 238. 

MTH 249 

LINEAR ALGEBRA 

The study of vector spaces. Topics include linear independence, bases 
and dimension, linear transformation matrices, and systems of linear 
equations. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: MTH 238. 

MTH 290 

SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS 

By special arrangement for individuals or groups. Study of special topics, 
i.e.. Differential Calculus, Modern Algebra, Modern Geometry. Arrange- 
ment to be made through instructor and Division Director. 1-4 Cr. 



MTH 500 

TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS II 

Topics from algebra, geometry, right triangle trigonometry, and other 
areas. Emphasizes practical problems in the student's area of concentra- 
tion. 3 Cr. (3-0). Cannot be used to satisfy math requirements for 
students in the General Studies Associate Degree program. Prerequisite: 
MTH 710 or equivalent or permission of instructor. 

MTH 515 

GENERAL AVIATION MATHEMATICS 

Fundamental operations with common and decimal fractions, mixed 
numbers, square root algorithm, area, volume, ratio, signed numbers, 
and other selected topics. For aviation students. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

MTH 710 

TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I 

Arithmetic operations with whole numbers, common and decimal frac- 
tions, percent, basic principles of measurement, fundamentals of the 
metric system, ratio and proportion, and practical geometry. Other 
selected topics in technical-vocational mathematics include graphs and 
consumer mathematics or basic algebra and basic trigonometry, depend- 
ing on a student's curriculum. For students in certificate programs. 3 Cr. 
(3-0). Placement by mathematics examination. 



MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (MTR) 



MTR 101 

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY I 

Introduction to medical terminology. Emphasizes etiology, 
tomatology, pathology, and diagnostic procedures. 3 Cr. (3-0). 



symp- 



MTR 102 

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY II 

Continuation of MTR 101. Students learn to read and understand the 
language of medicine. Emphasizes the meanings of root words and their 
combining forms. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: MTR 101. 




NURSERY MANAGEMENT (NMG, OHT) 



NMG 121 

NURSERY PRODUCTION I 

Nurseries and careers. Covers aspects of garden center location, layout 
and design and merchandising techniques. Includes nursery structures 
and facilities, nursery equipment, plant growth, growth habits and prun- 
ing. Nursery practices: ball and burlapping and transplanting. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

NMG 126 

WOODY PLANTS II 

Continuation of OHT 115. Covers additional plants — emphasizes 
deciduous trees, shrubs, vines, ground covers, and their varieties and 
cultivars (varieties grown under cultivation). 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisite: OHT 
115. 

NMG 232 

NURSERY PRODUCTION II 

Nursery aspects of plant propagation. Emphasizes field and container 

production techniques, production schedules, nursery soil management, 

weed control, and cost analysis. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisite: NMG 121. 



® 



NMG237 

WOODY PLANTS III 

Advanced study of plant identification. Emphasizes broad leaved and nar- 
row leaved evergreens - their varieties and cultivars. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prere- 
quisites: NMG 126, OHT 1 15. 

NMG 245 

LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION 

Techniques used to build landscape features. Includes the construction 
of patios, walks, retaining walls, fences, fountains, waterfalls, pools and 
steps using various materials. Establishing and maintaining lawns and 
plantings. Specifications, bidding and pricing of landscape jobs are also 
covered. 3 Cr. (1-6). 

NMG 248 

LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE 

Covers aspects of turf management and tree care (arboriculture). 
Establishment and maintenance of different types of turf areas. Em- 
phasizes golf course, institutional, park, and home turf areas. Planting, 
climbing, guying, pruning, fertilizing, cabling, and bracing of shade trees. 
Stresses evaluation and care of ornamental trees. 3 Cr. (2-3). 
Prerequisites: OHT 11 5, OHT 239. 

NMG 249 
LANDSCAPE DESIGN 

Covers the principles and problems of landscape design. Emphasizes the 
effective use of plant materials in developing landscaped areas — for 
homes and public areas — to make them as attractive and useful as possi- 
ble. Includes basic drawing and drafting principles. 3 Cr. (1-6). 
Prerequisites: NMG 126, OHT 1 15. 

OHT 114 
HORTICULTURE SOILS 

Study of soil texture, structure, organic matter, and plant nutrients as 
related to the use of lime and fertilizers. Synthetic soils and moisture-air 
relationships included. 3 Cr. 12-3). 

OHT 115 

WOODY PLANTS I 

An introduction to the study of trees, shrubs, and vines grown in 
nurseries for landscape purposes. The course stresses the identification 
and uses of woody plants. 2Cr. (1-3). 

OHT 116 
HERBACEOUS PLANTS 

The classification, identification and general culture of perennials, bulbs, 
and roses. Practice in landscape use and design of flower borders. 3 Cr. 
(2-3). 

OHT 234 

PLANT PROPAGATION 

Theory and practice of plant propagation by sexual and asexual means — 
applications in floriculture production, nursery production, and forestry. 3 
Cr. (2-3). 

OHT 239 

PLANT INSECTS & DISEASES 

The insects and diseases of horticulture crops. The nature, structure, 
growth habits, harmful effects, and control of insects and related forms. 
The most common and harmful plant diseases are studied for identifica- 
tion and control. 3 Cr. (2-3) . Prerequisite: BIO 1 1 1. 

OHT 246 

HORTICULTURE MECHANICS 

Operation and maintenance of horticulture equipment. Includes small 
gasoline engines, electric motors, electrical fans, environmental controls, 
and other soil working and irrigation equipment. 3 Cr. (2-3). 




ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE (FLR, NMG, OHT) 

See FLORICULTURE and NURSERY MANAGEMENT 



OUTDOOR POWER EQUIPMENT (OPE) 



OPE 710 

SMALL ENGINE FUNDAMENTALS (8 weeks) 

Introduction to basic tools and special tools of the trade. Covers engine 
identification, operation of two and four-cycle engines and the use of 
parts and service manuals. 5Cr. (5-15). 

OPE 711 

DRIVE UNITS AND SYSTEMS (8 weeks) 

Emphasizes lawn mowers, riding mowers and garden tractors. Covers 
general operation and maintenance procedures and drive systems, 
manual transmissions, hydrostatic units, differentials, angle drive units 
and hydraulic systems. 5Cr. (5-15). 

OPE 721 

OPERATION, REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE (8 weeks) 

Correct operation, maintenance and repair of chainsaws, snowmobiles, 
motorcycles and outboard engines. 5 Cr. (5-15). 

OPE 722 

SHOP OPERATION AND CUSTOMER RELATIONS (8 weeks) 

Emphasizes personal appearance, conduct, attitude and employee- 
employer relations. Includes general shop operation, bookkeeping, inven- 
tory control, writing shop repair orders, warranty procedures and 
customer relations. 5 Cr. (5-15). 




PHILOSOPHY (PHL) 



PHL 111 

INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 

Investigation of major concerns of philosophy: Meaning and Truth, 
Perception and External World; God, Mind and Body. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

PHL 121 

ETHICS AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 

Students analyze the value systems and political/social theories that 
shape thought and reality in society. Students examine contemporary 
ethical problems and the forces which reshape values and political ideas. 
3 Cr. (3-0). 

PHL 250 

PHILOSOPHY, SPORTS, GAMES, PHYSICAL EXERTION 

Considerations of the nature of humans and the world through the study 
of the interplay of mind and matter in sports, games, and physical exer- 
tion. Special emphasis on stress in physical exertion and its effects on 
consciousness. Applications to morality, psychology, religion, social 
organization. Latitude given to the pursuit of individual and group in- 
terests. Involvement by those able in physically exerting activity, such as 
running, swimming, cross-country skiing, weight-lifting, etc. 3 Cr. (3-0). 






108 



PHYSICS (PHS) 



PHS100 

PHYSICS- MECHANICS 

Lecture, demonstrations. Problem-solving course in elementary 
mechanics; basic concepts of scientific method; the metric systems; vec- 
tors, translatory motion; rotary motion, work, power, energy; physical 
properties of liquids, solids, gases. Suitable for associate degree students 
in technology programs. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisites: MTH 103 or equivalent. 
MTH 104 background is desirable and we recommend it be taken prior to 
or concurrent with PHS 100. 

PHS 101 

PHYSICS- HEAT AND LIGHT 

Basic principles of heat and its measurements: thermometry, calorimetry, 
expansion of liquids, solids, and gases, transfer of heat. Light includes 
refraction, illumination, optics and color. Suitable for associate degree 
students in technology programs. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisite: MTH 103 or 
equivalent. PHS 100 is recommended. 

PHS 102 

PHYSICS- ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 

Fundamental concepts of electrostatics, electrolysis; AC and DC circuits, 
magnetism; electromagnetic induction. Basic principles of electricity. 
Suitable for associate degree students in technology programs. 4 Cr. 
(4-0). Prerequisite: PHS 100. 

PHS 106 

INTRODUCTION TO METALLURGY 

Introduction to physical metallurgy; chemical composition, crystalliza- 
tion. Effects of mechanical treatment: drawing, rolling, shaping; thermal 
or heat treatment. 4 Cr. (4-0). Prerequisite: None, PHS 100 is recommend- 
ed. 

PHS 112 

INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS 

Fundamental laws and properties of matter, mechanics, heat and light. 
Emphasizes electricity and magnetism. Introductory course for students 
taking PHS 122 and an appropriate lab science for non-science majors in- 
tending to transfer to a four-year institution. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisite: High 
school algebra. 

PHS 115 

COLLEGE PHYSICS I 

Lecture, demonstration and laboratory course involving some theoretical 
work but with emphasis on problem solving in elementary mechanics and 
thermal physics. Topics include: metric system, vectors, motion, 
Newton's Laws, energy, momentum, properties of matter, heat, the 
Laws of Thermodynamics and waves. Calculus will not be used. 4 Cr. 
(3-3). Prerequisites: MTH 104 or equivalent and one year of high school 
science. Exceptional students may take MTH 104 as a corequisite. 

PHS 116 

GENERAL PHYSICS I 

Principles of mechanics and heat. Calculus is used when it leads to a 
more direct solution of problems. For science and engineering majors. 4 
Cr. (3-3). Corequisite: MTH 238. 

PHS 122 

RADIATION PHYSICS 

The fundamentals of electrical and radiation physics and the principles 
underlying the operation of x-ray equipment and auxiliary devices. 3 Cr. 
(3-0). Prerequisite: PHS 112. 



PHS 125 

COLLEGE PHYSICS II 

Lecture, demonstration and laboratory course involving some theoretical 
work but with emphasis on problem solving in electricity, magnetism and 
light. Topics include: electric and magnetic fields, induction, direct and 
alternating current, electrical instruments, electromagnetic waves, optics 
and (time permitting) the basics of modern physics. Calculus will not be 
used. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisite: PHS 115. 

PHS 126 

GENERAL PHYSICS II 

Continuation of PHS 116. Principles of electricity, magnetism, wave mo- 
tion, optics and sound. For science and engineering majors. 4 Cr. (3-3). 
Prerequisite: PHS 116. Corequisite: MTH 248. 

PHS 202 
MECHANICS 

Intermediate course in kinematics and dynamics. Differential and integral 
calculus are used extensively in derivations and problems. 4 Cr. (3-3). 
Prerequisites: PHS 126 and MTH 248. 

PHS 236 

MODERN PHYSICS 

Atomic and nuclear physics. Includes structures of atom and nucleus, 
radioactivity; fission and fusion; relativity; and the periodic table of 
elements. 4 Cr. (3-3). Prerequisites: PHS 126and MTH248. 

PHS 500 
PHYSICS SURVEY 

Covers most of the following topics — selected to meet the needs of the 
majority of students in any particular section — matter and measurement; 
behavior of solids, liquids, and gases; mechanics, including forces, mo- 
tion, energy, power, and machines; heat; sound; light; optics; 
magnetism; electricity; atomic phenomena. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: MTH 
710 or equivalent. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING (PLH) 



PLH254 

PLUMBING FOR THE TRADES 

Theory and laboratory assignments in basic plumbing. The technical 
aspects of residential water and drainage systems, materials, fixtures, 
tools and equipment and job safety. Methods and techniques of applying 
plumbing skills in the trade areas. 2 Cr. (1-3). 

PLH 711 

BASIC PLUMBING (First 8 weeks) 

Correct use of hand and power tools used in the plumbing trade. 
Methods of joining various types of pipe used in plumbing systems. Pro- 
vides working knowledge of drain-waste-vent systems recognized by the 
National Standard Plumbing Code. 6 Cr. (6-18). 

PLH 712 

ADVANCED PLUMBING SKILLS (Second 8 weeks) 

Installation and repair of potable water systems used in residential con- 
struction. Identifying components of residential plumbing fixtures. In- 
struction in the installation and repair of water heaters, kitchen and 
bathroom fixtures and well pumps. Covers the National Plumbing Code 
as it relates to residential potable water and drainage systems. 6 Cr. 
(6-18). Prerequisite: PLH 71 1. 

PLH 721 

PLUMBING SYSTEMS AND BLUEPRINTS (First 8 weeks) 
Introduction to commercial blueprint reading and isometric pipe sket- 
ching. Material estimates and ordering. Installation and repair of commer- 
cial fixtures; design and construction of cooperative group projects; 
specialty plumbing includes systems for hospitals and handicapped. 6 Cr. 
(6-18). Prerequisite: PLH 712. 



109 



PLH722 

ADVANCED SYSTEM AND CODES (Second 8 weeks) 

Introduction to commercial blueprint reading and isometric pipe welding 
sketching; material estimates and ordering; installation and repair of 
residential fixtures; design and construction of individual projects. 6 Cr. 
(6-181. Prerequisite: PLH 712. 

PLH832 

HOT WATER • HEAT CONSERVATION (Second 8 weeks) 

Basic skills needed to lay out, size and install various hydronic hot water 
systems and hot air for residential and commercial installations. Gas, oil, 
coal, wood, and combination fuel fired systems. 6 Cr. (6-18). Prerequisite: 
PLH 833, 

PLH 833 

HEAT LOSS CALCULATIONS - PIPE WELDING (First 8 weeks) 

Basic skills required to calculate heat loss for residential and commercial 
installation; energy conservation. Practice in calculating, designing, and 
laying out hot water heating systems. Introduction to acetylene welding, 
cutting and electric arc pipe welding. Short unit on lead repair work. 7 Cr. 
(8-16). Prerequisite: PLH 722. 

PLH 841 

STEAM HEAT AND PIPEFITTING (First 8 weeks) 

Basic skills needed to lay out, size and install residential and commercial 
steam heat systems, boilers and trim. Emphasizes combustion efficiency 
testing and oil burner service and repairs. Practical experience stresses 
advanced piping. 6 Cr. (6-18). Prerequisites: PLH 832, PLH 833. 

PLH 842 

FIELD WORK AND ADVANCED SKILLS (Second 8 weeks) 

On-the-job work experience using trade skills acquired in previous 
courses. Emphasizes layout, roughing-in, and finish operations. Coor- 
dination among the trades, cooperation and on-the-job attitudes are 
stressed. Depending on job commitments, course may include instruc- 
tion in such related skills as sheet metal, overhead welding and alternate 
heat sources. This course may be completed on a Cooperative Education 
basis. 6 Cr. (6-18). Prerequisites: PLH 711, PLH 712, PLH 721, PLH 722, 
PLH832, PLH833, PLH841. 



PRACTICAL NURSING (NUR) 



NUR 101 

FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING 

A basic course providing an orientation to the practical nursing program. 
Includes philosophy, objectives and responsibilities of the student nurse; 
the learning process, communication skills, basic nursing knowledge, 
legal and ethical aspects of nursing and skills common to all areas of nurs- 
ing practice. Emphasizes the basic needs of clients of all ages including: 
physical hygiene, comfort, rest, nutrition, safety, developmental needs 
and concepts of sepsis and asepsis. The process of developing, 
implementing and evaluating care plans is introduced. Math for 
pharmacology is introduced. 12 Cr. (8-12). 

NUR 201 

NURSING CARE OF ADULT AND CHILD I 

The study of the nursing care of adults and children continues the basic 
medical-surgical concepts studied in NUR 101. Focuses on an introduc- 
tion to the disease process as it affects the individual throughout the life 
span. The student is expected to function progressively as a contributing 
member of the nursing team, and to develop and implement patient- 
centered care plans. Also covers the study of drug preparation and 
administration. 14 Cr. (8-18). 



© 



NUR 301 

NURSING CARE OF ADULT AND CHILD II 

A continuation of NUR 201. Covers advanced principles of nursing as 
related to the disease process. Also includes issues and trends in nursing, 
nursing and community organizations, and the role of the LPN in society. 
16 Cr. (8-21). 



PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) 



PSY111 

GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Introduction to the science of human behavior and mental processes. 
Students examine the relation between the nervous system and behavior, 
learning, perception, language, personalit-, intelligence and 
psychopathology. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

PSY 201 

ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Principal forms of mental and emotional disorders with emphasis on their 
causes, symptoms, and courses of treatment. By examining distorted or 
exaggerated behavior, students develop a clearer sense of normal 
behavior. 3Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: PSY 111 or permission of the instructor. 

PSY 203 

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychological development and change throughout the life span. Em- 
phasizes principles of child and adolescent development, genetic and en- 
vironmental influences on the course of physical, motor, intellectual, 
emotional, social, and personality development. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: 
PSY 111 or permission of the instructor. 

PSY 231 

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychological principles and concepts applied to learning. Students 
explore intelligence and intelligence testing, cognitive development, lear- 
ning and memory, creativity, language and other relevant topics. These 
are applied to practical educational problems. 3 Cr. (3-0). PSY 111 is 
recommended as a prerequisite. 

PSY 241 

SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Interaction of individuals in groups. Harmony and conflict within groups 
as well as between groups, group leadership and group controls, 
phenomena of imitation and suggestion. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

PSY 290 

SPECIAL STUDIES IN PSYCHOLOGY 

Special attention to particular abilities and interests of students. In- 
dividual guidance in advanced studies. Admission by permission of the in- 
structor. 1-3 Cr. (1 to 3-0). 




QUANTITY FOODS (QFP) 



QFP510 

INTRODUCTION TO FOOD SERVICE (8 weeks) 

Covers essential elements of personal hygiene, sanitation and safety. In- 
cludes the use of small equipment and the use and care of commercial 
food production equipment. 3 Cr. (1-2). 



QFP511 

SALADS. SOUPS. AND SANDWICH PREPARATION (8 weeks) 

Covers the preparation of beverages, salads, sandwiches, soups and en- 
trees using eggs and cheese. 4 Cr. (1-3). 

QFP 520 

MANAGEMENT AND PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES (8 weeks) 
Provides a comparison of careers in fast food and those in fine dining 
establishments. Advanced studies in sanitation and safety and the ap- 
plication of nutritional information in food preparation. 3 Cr. (1 -2) . 

QFP 521 

DESSERTS, SAUCES AND MEAT PREPARATION (8 weeks) 

Covers the preparation of desserts, buffet items and sauces. Includes 
skills in bake shop and cafeteria operations. 4 Cr. ( 1 -3) . 

QFP 530 

TECHNIQUES OF FOOD PRODUCTION (8 weeks) 

An orientation to careers in food service. Students develop competencies 
in nutrition, table setting and recording tips. 3 Cr. (1-2). 

QFP 531 

STARCHES AND ENTREE PRODUCTION (8 weeks) 

Covers the preparation of vegetables, potatoes, pasta, rice, meats and 

poultry. 4 Cr. (1-3). 

QFP 540 

ADVANCED TECHNIQUES OF FOOD PRODUCTION 

AND SERVICES (8 weeks) 

Covers job applications, cost controls, record keeping and procedures for 

food purchasing and storage. 3 Cr. (1-2). 

QFP 541 

SHORT ORDER PREPARATION (8 weeks) 

Provides competencies in food service management for cooks. 4 Cr. 
(1-3). 




RADIOGRAPHY (RAD) 



RAD 110 

RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY I 

Basic concepts of ethical principles and medical structure. Chemical 
aspects of processing a radiographic film and efficient darkroom 
(processing) procedures. Theoretical and practical instruction in the 
radiographic positioning of body structure and organs. Manipulation of 
exposure factors pertaining to milliamperage, kilovolts, distance, and 
time. Discussion of basic radiation protection. 5 Cr. (3-13). 

RAD 120 

RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY II 

Theory of x-ray technique. Necessity of different radiographic views to 
avoid superimposition of structure. The involvement of contrast media in 
relation to reactions, and contraindications to these media. Emphasizes 
nursing procedures as they relate to radiology. 7 Cr. (4-16). Prerequisite: 
RAD 110. 

RAD 201/202 

SUMMER INTERNSHIPS 

Required internships establish eligibility for registry examination. Intern- 
ships are arranged with affiliated hospitals. 1 Cr. each. 



RAD 230 

RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY III 

Students create a working combination — or establish a new combina- 
tion — of exposure factors using x-ray components to produce an inter- 
pretive film. Advanced positioning of special radiographic views to 
demonstrate various anatomical parts. Introduces the operating suite in 
relation to medical aseptic technique and radiographic procedures. Em- 
phasizes technical special radiographic procedures and quality control ap- 
plications. Theory of radiation physics and protection. 10 Cr. (5-15). 
Prerequisite: RAD 120. 

RAD 240 

RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY IV 

Emphasizes basic concepts of diseases and their effects on the human 
body. Continued advanced radiographic positioning instruction. 
Theoretical instruction in magnetic reasonance, digital and CT scanning. 
Concepts of computer literacy will also be discussed. Basic concepts of 
scientific research. 10 Cr. (5-15). Prerequisite: RAD 230. 



REAL ESTATE (RES) 



RES 112 

REAL ESTATE FUNDAMENTALS 

This course is an introduction to the field of real estate. It emphasizes the 
legal aspects of real property ownership and lease arrangements and the 
instruments commonly used in property transactions. The functions per- 
formed by both the real estate broker and the salesperson and the pro- 
cedures used are included. Real estate law, as it pertains to real estate 
transactions and the licensing law, is covered. This course can be applied 
toward the salesperson's license. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

RES 113 

REAL ESTATE LAW 

This course covers the legal aspects of buying, selling, and holding real 
estate. This course can be used for the salesperson's license. 3 Cr. (3-0). 
Prerequisite: RES 1 12 or Division permission. 

RES 114 

REAL ESTATE APPRAISAL 

Elementary principles and practices of appraising residential real estate, 
with in-depth study of the three approaches used to arrive at estimated 
value. 3Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: RES 1 12 or Division permission. 

RES 115 

REAL ESTATE PRACTICE 

The purpose of this course is to help students develop and learn to apply 
the skills needed to sell real estate. Students taking this class will learn a 
great deal about interpersonal relationships — how people act, react, and 
interact with each other. Students will also be required to practice (in the 
classroom) the skills they learn. Emphasizes the practical aspects of sell- 
ing — how to fill out a contract — and less tangible aspects — how to go 
about getting buyers and sellers to the stage where they are willing to fill 
out a contract. 3 Cr. (3-0) . Prerequisite: RES 1 12 or Division permission. 

RES 116 

REAL ESTATE FINANCING 

This course will prepare the average real estate salesperson to put 
together a money package to successfully close a deal. The course will 
also acquaint students with sources of funds available and the methods 
and regulations involved in purchasing, selling, or acting as an agent to 
sell real estate. 3 Cr. (3-0) . Prerequisite: RES 1 12 or Division permission. 

RES 117 

REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT 

This course introduces the student to the basic managerial theories and 
strategies related to the real estate field. This course can be used for the 
real estate broker's license. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: RES 112 or Division 
permission. 



111 



RES 119 

REAL ESTATE MATH 

This course covers the basic mathematics used by real estate profes- 
sionals. Course credits can be applied only toward the broker's license. 
However, the subject matter covered is ideal as a review for individuals 
taking the salesperson's exam. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: RES 112 or Divi- 
sion permission. 

RES 120 

REAL ESTATE TAXES 

This course will emphasize the basic tax structure in our economy as it 
relates to the real estate field. This course can be used for the salesper- 
son's and broker's license. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: RES 112 or Division 
permission. 

RES 212 

REAL ESTATE PRINCIPLES 

This course is a more advanced in-depth study of the principles of financ- 
ing, transferring property, contracts and various types of ownership as 
they relate to real estate. This course can be used for both the salesper- 
son's and broker's license. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: RES 112 or Division 
permission. 



See page 78 for information on the Real Estate sale's and broker's ex- 
aminations. 



RETAIL MANAGEMENT (MKT) 



MKT233 

RETAIL PRINCIPLES 

Designed to familiarize students with the field of retailing. Provides the 
technical and theoretical knowledge necessary for retail management 
jobs. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

MKT 240 
MARKETING 

This course illustrates various methods of merchandising and the channel 
of distribution from producer or manufacturer to the consumer. Govern- 
ment regulations, pricing, cost and branding, influence of buyers and 
consumers on marketing programs and current marketing trends are 
presented. 3Cr. (3-0). 

MKT 243 
SALES 

Examines the positive role personal selling plays in the American 
economy and documents the extent to which "sales" has aided in our 
economic growth. This course is designed to show the role of selling in 
helping customers recognize and satisfy wants and needs and explains 
how this satisfaction can lead to a higher standard of living. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

MKT 245 

FASHION MERCHANDISING AND DISPLAY 

Designed to familiarize students with the field of retail merchandising. 
Provides the technical and theoretical knowledge necessary for retail 
management. Includes three laboratory hours per week during which 
students work on window displays and a fashion show. 4 Cr. (3-3). 

MKT 247 

RETAIL MANAGEMENT 

Continues to build students' knowledge of the activities needed to make a 
retail business succeed. Emphasizes quantitative analysis of management 
problems and information systems through electronic data processing. 
Retailing is studied from the viewpoint of a middle manager in a larger 
retail firm and as it applies to owners of retail establishments. 3 Cr. (3-0) . 



112 




SECRETARIAL OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION (CLS. SEC) 



CLS718 

CLERICAL OFFICE PROCEDURES 

Students develop the skills needed to work in a wide range of office posi- 
tions. Covers basic office duties, including handling the mail, office com- 
munications, filing, reprographics (duplicating), performing financial 
tasks, and meeting the public. Students also develop skills in such prac- 
tical tasks as typewriting, proofreading, spelling, vocabulary, and handl- 
ing correspondence. The course is designed to contribute to the stu- 
dent's understanding of the nature of the office and its importance in the 
business world. 5 Cr. (4-3). 

CLS 726 
MICROTRANSCRIPTION 

Emphasizes effective transcription of machine-recorded information 
using microcomputer equipment. Covers equipment, efficient techniques 
and procedures, proofreading skills, and effective dictation. 3 Cr. (3-0). 
Prerequisites: SEC 111, CLS 718, CSC 104. 

CLS 729 

CLERICAL OFFICE WORKSHOP 

Experience with practical problems and job-like assignments in simulated 
office situations give students realistic practice in meeting job demands. 
Develops skills in payroll procedures and office machines, plus the sup- 
plemental skills needed to meet office responsibilities. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prere- 
quisites: SEC 1 1 1, CLS 718. 

SEC 111 
TYPEWRITING I 

Develops basic typing skills. Includes introduction to the typewriter; 
development of touch typewriting; development of speed and accuracy; 
introduction to business letters, memos, and tabulations; development of 
proper attitudes. Taught in the Individualized Learning Center, which per- 
mits the student to proceed at his/her own pace, moving from lesson to 
lesson as skills are mastered. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

SEC 114 
SHORTHAND I 

Basic theory and techniques of Gregg Shorthand. Emphasizes outlines, 
proper techniques, and attainment of fluency in reading and writing shor- 
thand. Dictation is given at 60+ words per minute for three minutes, to 
be transcribed with a 95+ percent level of accuracy. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

SEC 121 
TYPEWRITING II 

Advances the student's ability in typewriting. Emphasizes production typ- 
ing; tabulation; special skill techniques; advanced letter writing; forms, 
documents, and other routine typewriting duties. Taught in the In- 
dividualized Learning Center, which permits the student to proceed at 
his/her own pace, moving from lesson to lesson as skills are mastered. 3 
Cr. (2-3). Prerequisite: SEC 111. Students may also qualify by passing the 
appropriate test. 

SEC 124 
SHORTHAND II 

Continuation of SEC 114. Emphasizes the development of skills in taking 
dictation and transcription. Typewritten transcription is included. Dicta- 
tion is given at 80 + words per minute for three minutes, to be transcribed 
with a 95+ percent level of accuracy. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisites: SEC 111 
and SEC 1 14. Students may also qualify by passing the appropriate test. 



SEC 125 

SECRETARIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES 

Introduction to the responsibilities and the opportunities of the secretarial 
field. Emphasizes administrative aspects of secretarial work. Includes in- 
troduction to dictating and transcribing equipment, telecommunications, 
and the use of the microcomputer. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisite: SEC 111. 
Students may also qualify by passing the appropriate test. 

SEC 231 
TYPEWRITING III 

Designed for the typist with a sustained high level, accurate straight-copy 
speed. Provides an opportunity to master basic typing formats, to review 
and apply technical information, and to develop creativity and originality. 
Taught in the Individualized Learning Center, this course includes higher 
levels of typing — following directions, editing copy, composing letters, 
creating arrangements of tables— and other involved typewriting projects 
which the student will master at his/her own pace. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prere- 
quisite: SEC 121. Students may also qualify by passing the appropriate 
test. 

SEC 236 

SPECIALIZED TERMINOLOGY AND TRANSCRIPTION 

Intensive review of advanced Gregg Shorthand with emphasis on ex- 
ecutive, legal, or medical vocabulary. Dictation is given at 100+ words 
per minute for three minutes, to be transcribed with a 95+ percent level 
of accuracy. Students are given intensive training in the transcription of 
letters and specialized forms. Emphasizes supplemental skills needed to 
meet secretarial responsibilities. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisites: SEC 121 and 
SEC 124. 

SEC 242 

PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP 

Practical experience through work assignments in specialized offices. 2 
Cr. (0-6). Prerequisites: SEC 121, SEC 124, and SEC 125. 

SEC 246 

SECRETARIAL MICROTRANSCRIPTION 

Integrates all phases of advanced dictation, transcription, and secretarial 
skills. Dictation is given at 100-120+ words per minute for three minutes, 
to be transcribed with a 98+ percent level of accuracy, using a 
microcomputer for transcription. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisite: SEC 236. 

SEC 247 

SECRETARIAL OFFICE SIMULATION 

Students work on an individual basis in completing specialized kits and 
dictation tapes which require the use of comprehensive secretarial train- 
ing. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisite: SEC 236. 

SEC 509 
TYPEWRITING 

For non-business students. Includes touch typewriting, speed and con- 
trol, familiarization with business letters, memos, reports, and personal 
typing. Taught in the Individualized Learning Center, which permits the 
student to proceed at his/her own pace, moving from lesson to lesson as 
skills are mastered. 1 Cr. (0-3). 



SERVICE AND OPERATION OF HEAVY 
CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT (SOE) 



SOE713 

SERVICE AND OPERATION I (8 weeks) 

Introduction to heavy equipment mechanics. Begins with basic tools, 
micrometers and lifting equipment. Includes complete engine 
nomenclature (terms used to describe parts of the engine) and engine 
overhaul. 7 Cr. (7-18). 



SOE 714 

SERVICE AND OPERATION II (8 weeks) 

Basic vehicle electrical systems. Includes electro-magnetism, ignition cir- 
cuits, starting circuits, and electric troubleshooting. 7 Cr. (7-18). 

SOE 725 

SERVICE AND OPERATION III (8 weeks) 

Introduction to the maintenance and repair of various types of clutches, 
gear type transmissions, and differentials. Maintenance of seals and anti- 
friction bearings. 7 Cr. (8-17). 

SOE 726 

SERVICE AND OPERATION IV (8 weeks) 

Introduction to the maintenance and repair of final drives, undercar- 
riages, tracks, and tires. Maintenance and repair of brake systems. 7 Cr. 
(8-17). 

SOE 837 

SERVICE AND OPERATION V (8 weeks) 

Introduction to the various types of hydraulic systems used on heavy con- 
struction equipment. Includes pumps, motors, valves, cylinders, etc. 7 
Cr. (8-17). 

SOE 838 

SERVICE AND OPERATION VI (8 weeks) 

Introduction to the service, repair, testing, and troubleshooting of torque 
converters and power shift transmissions. Introduction to the hydrostatic 
transmission. Testing hydrostatic transmissions. Advanced electrical cir- 
cuits and troubleshooting. 7 Cr. (8-17). 

SOE 847 

SERVICE AND OPERATION VII (8 weeks) 

Introduction to basic construction surveying, construction blueprint 
reading, and grade stake reading. Operating various types of heavy con- 
struction equipment — dozers, loaders, motor graders, and scrapers. 
Service of machines operated. 6 Cr. (6-19). 

SOE 848 

SERVICE AND OPERATION VIII (8 weeks) 

A continuation of SOE 847. Emphasizes developing skills as an equipment 

operator or mechanic. 6 Cr. (6-19). 



SOCIOLOGY (SOC) 



SOC111 

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 

An introduction to the basic concepts and methods used in studying the 
group life of human beings. Students analyze forces which shape social 
practice and norms and explore alternative social practices. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

SOC 112 

GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY 

Survey of the physical and cultural evolution of humans and society. Em- 
phasizes the relationship of the human physical structure to behavior and 
comparative descriptions of recent primitive societies. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

SOC 231 

MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY 

Examination of traditional and contemporary American marital and family 
relationships. Students examine expectations, roles, and values in 
various marriage and family patterns and explore forces promoting 
change. 3Cr. (3-0). 

SOC 241 

URBAN SOCIOLOGY 

The concept of community as it operates and affects individual and group 
behavior in rural, suburban, and urban settings. Emphasizes 
characteristic institutions and problems of modern city life. 3 Cr. (3-0). 
Prerequisite: SOC 1 1 1. 



® 



SOC 242 
CRIMINOLOGY 

The social relationships and situations involved in the causes and preven- 
tion of crime and juvenile delinquency. Particular emphasis on the func- 
tioning of the U.S. criminal justice system. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: SOC 
111. 

SOC 290 

SPECIAL STUDIES IN SOCIOLOGY 

Special attention to particular abilities and interests of students. In- 
dividual guidance in advanced studies. Admission by permission of the in- 
structor. 1-3 Cr. (1 to 3-01. 



SPANISH (SPA) 



SPA 111 

BEGINNING SPANISH I 

Basic grammar and language structure. Comprehension, speaking and 
reading. Emphasizes pronunciation and accent. 3 Cr. (3-0). 

SPA 121 

BEGINNING SPANISH II 

Continuation of SPA 111. 3 Cr. (3-0) . Prerequisite: SPA 111. 



SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY (SRT) 



SRT110 

PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY I 

A study of the surgical process including aspects of the operating room 
environment; patient care and the practice of surgery; medications used 
during surgery; pre, intra and post-operative techniques of surgery; 
micro-organisms and how they affect the human body; the physical, 
spiritual, psychological needs and medico-legal rights of the patient. 12 
Cr. (9-9). 

SRT 120 

PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY II 

An in-depth study of the various surgical specialties and associated 
surgical procedures. Anatomy and physiology and the disease conditions 
of the body will be reviewed. 4 Cr. (4-0). Prerequisites: SRT 110, BIO 110, 
MTR 101. 

SRT 121 

CLINICAL SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Application of lecture and laboratory materials in the hospital surgical 
suite to gain practical experience in general and specialty surgical pro- 
cedures. In-depth study in procedures, instrumentation and equipment. 
10 Cr. (2-24). Prerequisites: SRT 110, BIO 110, MTR 101. 

SRT 122 

DEPARTMENT OPERATING TECHNIQUES 

A hands-on course covering fundamental equipment operations used in a 
surgical department. Develops basic skills in the use of such equipment 
as autoclaves, ultrasonics, hypo-hyperthemia, washer sterilizers and 
endoscopy equipment. Emphasizes safe work habits. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prere- 
quisites: SRT 1 10, BIO 1 10, MTR 101. 



® 




TOOL DESIGN TECHNOLOGY (TDT) 



TDT 231 

TOOL DRAFTI NG (8 weeks) 

Transition between mechanical drafting and tool design; drawings, 
techniques; purchased parts; standards of shop drawings; material lists; 
designing cutting tools. 4 Cr. (4-12). Prerequisite: EDT 101 or EOT 1 1 1. 

TDT 232 

FIXTURE DESIGN (8 weeks) 

Designing leaf and tumble jigs, plain and index milling fixtures, vise jaws, 
chuck jaws, lathe fixtures, and adaptor plates. 4 Cr. (4-12). Prerequisite: 
TDT 231. 

TDT 241 

GAGE DESIGN AND PROGRAMMING (8 weeks) 

Writing programs for computerized numerical control machines. Design 
of plug, snap, ring, flush pin depth, length, and indicating gages. 4 Cr. 
(4-12). Prerequisite: EDT 101 or EDT 111. 

TDT 242 

DIE DESIGN (8 weeks) 

Designing cutting, forming, drawing, and cavity dies; simple, progressive 
and compound arrangements. 4 Cr. (4-12). Prerequisite: EDT 101 or EDT 
111. 




WELDING (WED 



WEL100 

INTRODUCTION TO WELDING PROCESSES 

Designed to give the non-welding major basic competencies in the four 
main welding processes used in industry today: shielded metal arc 
welding; oxy-acetylene welding and cutting; gas tungsten arc welding 
and gas metal arc welding. 3 Cr. (3-2). 

WEL 701 

ACETYLENE WELDING 

Basic acetylene welding for plumbing students. 2 Cr. (0-5). 

WEL 703 

ELECTRIC WELDING 

Selected units in basic electric welding for plumbing students. 2 Cr. (0-6). 

WEL 712 

ACETYLENE WELDING 

Theory and practice in welding sheet metal and mild steel plate; ox- 
yacetylene cutting; pipe welding, welding and brazing ferrous and non- 
ferrous metals; weld testing; shop safety. 13 Cr. (7-18). 

WEL 722 

ELECTRIC WELDING 

Principles and applications of basic electric welding. The use of various 
types of electrodes for welding steel plate in all positions, pipe welding; 
cast iron welding, weld testing. 13 Cr. (7-18). 



WE L 832 

INERT GAS WELDING 

Theories and practice in manual inert gas shield techniques (TIG) and in 
the short arc, high speed, semi-automatic, metallic arc process (MIG). 
13 Cr. (7-18). 

WEL842 

WELDING (ADVANCED) 

Practical theory and application of weldments to meet specifications of 
AWS, API and ASME codes. All position welding of heavy plate and 
pipe; testing and weld specimens. 13 Cr. (7-18). 



WOOD PRODUCTS TECHNOLOGY (WPT) 



WPT 1 1 1 

WOOD PROPERTIES AND UTILIZATION 

Physical characteristics, identification and use of wood. Includes machin- 
ing and manufacturing major wood products derived from commercially 
important species. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

WPT 121 

LUMBER AND LOG GRADING 

Separating and grading (sorting wood on the basis of quality) hardwood 
and softwood lumber according to wood industry standards. Sorting 
hardwood and softwood logs on the basis of lumber grade to assure high 
quality lumber products. 3 Cr. (1-6). 

WPT 122 
SAWMILLING I 

Identification and layout of major parts of a sawmill. Maintenance and 
safe operation of the equipment used to saw logs into lumber. 3Cr. (1-6). 

WPT 123 
LUMBER DRYING 

The process of drying lumber by natural or artificial methods. Includes 
layout of the lumber yard, dry kiln operation, and the handling and 
storage of green lumber. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

WPT 231 

WOOD INDUSTRY CO-OP/INTERNSHIP 

Practical experience in a planned, supervised program of work in a wood 
products industry. 3 Cr. (200 Hr.) 

WPT 232 
SAWMILLING II 

A continuation of Sawmilling I. Emphasizes practical skills in sawing 
lumber to grade in a safe and economical manner. 3 Cr. (1-6). 

WPT 233 

QUALITY CONTROL 

The characteristics of selected sawmill products — air and kiln dry pro- 
ducts, veneer and plywood, composition board, furniture and cabinetry, 
and chemically treated wood products. Includes the methods and equip- 
ment used to measure these characteristics and quality control in the 
wood industry. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

WPT 243 

PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 

Introduction to the processes of obtaining, manufacturing and marketing 
wood products in order to produce a profit. 3 Cr. (2-3). 

WPT 244 

EQUIPMENT AND MACHINERY 

A survey of the basic types of machinery used in wood processing and 
their relationship to the profitable management of a business. 3 Cr. (2-3). 



WORD PROCESSING (WDP) 



WDP 121 

WORD PROCESSING I 

Training in entry-level word processing operations on various types of 
word processors. Operation of mag card, tape, and electronic typewriters 
is covered. Training is also provided on stand-alone dedicated word pro- 
cessing machines and text-editing software packages for microcom- 
puters. Operation of a shared-logic system and ink-jet printer is included. 
3 Cr. (3-0) . Prerequisite: SEC 111 or SEC 509. 

WDP 231 

MACHINE TRANSCRIPTION AND OFFICE PROCEDURES 

Effective transcription of machine recorded information using word pro- 
cessing equipment is emphasized. Introduction to machine transcription 
is given on the Audio Visual Tutorial (AVT) System. Equipment, efficient 
techniques and procedures, proofreading skills and effective dictation are 
covered. Various office forms, mailing operations, filing, and operation of 
office equipment are also covered. 3 Cr. (2-3). Prerequisite: WDP 121. 

WDP 232 

WORD PROCESSING II 

Further develops the skills and knowledge acquired in Word Processing I. 
Emphasizes advanced machine features, including communication, file 
manipulation and the interface between various word processing 
machines. Includes training on text-editing features of the computer. 3 
Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: WDP 121. 

WDP 241 

WORD PROCESSING III 

Refines the student's operating, decision-making, and human relations 
skills to the levels required for employment. The most advanced features 
of text editing and file design are included. 3 Cr. (3-0). Prerequisite: WDP 
232. 

WDP 242 

WORD PROCESSING INTERNSHIP 

"Live" work experience on word processing equipment either at the Col- 
lege or in a cooperating business. Cooperative work experience (co-op) 
may be substituted. 3 Cr. (0-15). Prerequisite: WDP 232. 



115 



STUDENT 
SERVICES 




Orientation 

Prospective students participate in an orientation 
program designed to introduce them to the college 
community and its various services and activities. 
Students also schedule the appropriate academic 
courses for their first semester. 



Advisement and Career Services Center 

The Advisement and Career Services Center is located in 
Room 157, Learning Resources Center, adjacent to the 
Library. Advisement and Career Services houses a wide 
variety of occupational and educational information, 
including pamphlets, booklets, film strips and other 
career library resources. Staff members are available to 
work with individuals as they use these materials and to 
provide counseling for those who need assistance in 
career decision making. Other services include programs 
in resume writing, interview training, and job search 
strategies. The Advisement and Career Services Center 
is open to both students and non- students. 

Staff are available to help students with personal, 

academic, and career problems. The staff (with 

assistance from special faculty advisors) also help all 

new students select courses. 

Advisors: Each student is assigned an academic advisor. 

The advisor is usually an instructor in the student's 

program area. Students should discuss academic 

concerns or problems with their advisor. 

Counselors: Counselors are available to aid students in 



resolving many types of problems. Such problems may 
involve social, emotional, vocational, and personal 
concerns. Any need or concern which is perceived by 
the student as important will be viewed in the same way 
by the counselor. Information shared with a counselor 
will be held in confidence. 

College Transfer 

The Advisement and Career Services Center also assists 
students who need advice about transferring to other 
educational institutions. We keep a complete file of 
college catalogs and have statistics on various programs 
into which our students have transferred. 

Placement Services 

Placement services are designed to aid the prospective 
graduate seeking employment and alumni interested in 
career and employment information. The Advisement 
and Career Services Center maintains a file of full-time 
job opportunities as well as addresses of prospective 
employers. A library of company literature and 
applications is maintained in the office for students' use. 
Information on full and part-time job openings is also 
published regularly in The SPOTLIGHT (student 
newspaper). 

The Advisement and Career Services Center schedules 
on-campus interviews for companies which come to the 
College to recruit prospective graduates. Companies 
recruiting on campus include a number of leading 
industries from across the country. On-campus 
recruitment usually takes place from September through 
December and from February through April. Information 
on these interviews is announced in The SPOTLIGHT 
and in the New Week News. 

Placement seminars are held each semester, just prior to 
graduation, for prospective graduates. During these 
seminars sample letters of application and resumes are 
distributed. Students learn how to prepare for job 
interviews and receive information on employment 
trends in various parts of the country. During the 
seminars, students also provide information for their 
placement cards at the College. 



Services for Special Needs Students 

Many students are successful despite certain 
handicapping conditions. Advisement and Career 
Services staff coordinate all services for handicapped 
students. Students who need such services as special 
tutors, oral testing, tape recorders, note takers, mobility 
assistants, etc. are asked to contact the Center in Room 
157 of the Learning Resources Center before they enroll 
in classes so that any special arrangements can be 
made. 



116 



CAMPUS LIFE 




The College's activities program will give you the chance 
to meet other students, faculty and staff in a friendly 
relaxed environment. These activities also provide 
opportunities to gain leadership skills and to pursue 
special interests. Information on events and activities is 
announced in The Spotlight and in New Week News, on 
WWAS and on the College bulletin boards. 



Army Reserve Officers Training Corps 
(ROTO 

Students may enroll in the Army's Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps (ROTO Program. All qualified freshmen 
men and women are eligible to enroll, without 
obligation, in the basic course and can compete for full 
tuition and fees Army ROTC scholarships. 

The advance course — the junior and senior years— will 
be taken at a four-year institution after the student 
transfers. Veterans of enlisted service with any of the 
Armed Forces and members of the Army National Guard 
or Reserve, may qualify for the advanced course leading 
to an Army Reserve or National Guard commission upon 
graduation from the College and the opportunity for 
active duty after completion of undergraduate studies 
elsewhere. 

Successful completion of Army ROTC will be entered 
upon the student's permanent academic record but the 
College will not grant academic credit. 

For additional information on the Army ROTC program 
contact the Director of the Advisement and Career 



Services Center, Learning Resources Center, Room 157 
or the ROTC Department at Bucknell University (call 
collect: (717) 524-1100). 



Intramural Athletics Sports Program 

The College offers a well-balanced intramural athletics 
program. The program includes team and individual 
sports and gives students the opportunity to participate 
in both competitive and non-competitive activities. The 
intramural athletics sports program consists of the 
following activities: badminton, basketball, flag football, 
soccer, softball, table tennis, volleyball, 
weightlifting/training, wrestling, European team 
handball, pickle ball, two-on-two volleyball, and the 
Race Across the States. Anyone participating in 
intramural athletics does so at his/her own risk. 



Student Organizations 

New student clubs and organizations are constantly 
being formed. The following clubs are currently 
recognized: 

Agribusiness Club 

Alpha Omega Fellowship 

Alpha Pi Delta (Architectural) (inactive) 

Alumni Association 

Artists Unlimited 

Biology Club 

Chi Gamma lota (Veterans) (inactive) 

Cinema Club (inactive) 

Circle K 

Civil Engineering Technology Club 

Communications Club 

Computer Science Club 

Delta Phi Omega (Electronics) 

Diesel Power Club (inactive) 

Food & Hospitality Student Management Organization 

Forestry Technician Association 

Frisbee (inactive) 

Gamma Epsilon Tau (Graphic Arts) 

Horticulture Technicians Association 

International Relations Club (inactive) 

Mechanical Engineering Club (inactive) 

Multi-Cultural Society 

New Life Fellowship (inactive) 

Northcentral Pennsylvania Chapter of the Construction 

Specifications Institute (Architectural) 
Outing Club (inactive) 
Phi Beta Lambda (Business) 
Photography Club (inactive) 
Plumbers Club (inactive) 
Rifle and Pistol Club (inactive) 

Service and Operation of Heavy Equipment Association 
Sigma Pi Omega (Service organization) 
Ski Club 



117 



Sports Car Club (inactive) 

SPOTLIGHT Staff (Student newspaper) 

Student American Dental Hygienists Association 

Student Government Association 

Student Nurses of The Williamsport Area Community 

College (SNOW) 
Student Pennsylvania State Education Association 

(inactive) 
Student Society of Manufacturing and Engineering 
Table Tennis Club (inactive) 
Theater Ensemble (inactive) 
Varsity Club 
Williamsport Area Community College Band (inactive) 



College Colors and Nickname 

The College colors, gold and burgundy, and the 
nickname, Wildcats, were selected by popular vote of 
the students. 



Publications 

The SPOTLIGHT, the College's student newspaper, is 
published at regular intervals throughout the College 
year by students. 

The Student Handbook provides information on student 
events, regulations, and student services. 

New Week News is a newsletter issued several times 
weekly which keeps the student body and faculty 
informed on current issues, announcements, programs, 
and activities that affect the College. 




Social/Cultural/ Recreational Activities 

As a student you'll have opportunities to participate in a 
variety of activities sponsored by the College. These 
include: 

—The Student Government Association provides a 
variety of educational and social activities throughout 
the year, including leadership training, dances, movies 
and coffee houses. 

—The Special Events Committee offers cultural and 
special programs designed to appeal to students, staff 
and the community. Programs range from lectures 
and theater to the annual Bluegrass Festival. 

—The Office of the Coordinator of College Activities 
schedules lectures, special activities related to College 
programs and courses, and recreational and intramural 
activities. 

— Student organizations sponsor special activities and 
service projects throughout the year. 



Student Government 

Participation in the Student Government Association 
offers students the opportunity to develop leadership 
skills while contributing to the well-being of the College 
and the student body. In addition the Student 
Government Association offers a number of services for 
students. 

The goals of the Student Government Association are: 

1.To advocate student needs and represent the student 
body in matters related to College policy and 
activities. 

2. To promote opportunities for the educational, 
personal, social and cultural enrichment and growth of 
all students. 

3. To demonstrate concern for educational quality and 
physical safety in the College's instructional programs. 

4. To advocate effective communication among all levels 
of the College community. 

5. To promote the College's reputation and encourage 
respect for the College's environment. 

The SGA office is located in Room A-138 of the Lifelong 
Education Center (ext. 248). Students interested in 
participating in SGA should contact an SGA officer, 
their curriculum advisor or the Coordinator of College 
Activities in Room 108 of the Gymnasium. 



118 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 




Classification of Students 

Full-Time: A full-time student is one who carries 12 or 
more credits. Sixteen hours of lecture/demonstration, or 
48 hours of shop/lab, equal one credit. 

Part-Time: A degree or certificate candidate who carries 
fewer than 12 credits per semester is enrolled as a part- 
time student. 

Non-Degree: A non-degree student is one who is not 
enrolled in a degree or certificate program. Non-degree 
students can select courses without regard to degree or 
certificate requirements. Non-degree students are not 
eligible for financial aid. They are permitted to schedule 
classes on a first-come, first-served basis (after currently 
enrolled students have been given the opportunity to 
schedule classes). Non-degree students must complete 
an "Admissions Application" form the first time they 
schedule classes, but are not required to pay the 
application fee. 

Special Student: A handicapped student who cannot 
meet some of the requirements in certain shop programs 
is awarded a special certificate. It is not awarded to a 
student who may have failed to meet the requirements 
of a certificate program. Students must notify the 
College - PRIOR TO BEGINNING A PROGRAM - if 
they want to complete only part of the program and 
earn a special certificate. Exceptions will be made only 
for a student who becomes handicapped while enrolled 
in a certificate program. 

Students age 18 or older who do not have a high school 



diploma or the equivalent may also be classified as 
"special students." 

Satisfactory Progress: As long as a postsecondary 
student is officially enrolled and officially permitted to 
continue his/her studies toward a degree or certificate at 
the College, the student will be considered to be making 
satisfactory progress. Students receiving financial aid 
must meet additional criteria as explained in the 
Financial Aid section of this catalog (page 11) in order to 
continue to be eligible to receive financial aid. 



Scheduling/ Registration 

Because the number of students who can register for 
any class is limited, all students should schedule classes 
during the announced scheduling period. The College 
strongly urges all students to complete their registration, 
including payment of all fees, before the announced day 
of Late Registration for each semester. On the day of 
Late Registration students may schedule classes on a 
first-come/first-served basis. The College does not 
guarantee any student the right to register after Late 
Registration day. 



Credit Load 

The academic year is divided into two semesters of 
approximately 16 weeks each. The normal full-time load 
per semester is 12 to 18 credit-hours. Students should 
allow an average of at least two hours preparation for 
each credit-hour of course work. 

There are two sessions of varying length offered during 
the summer (May-August). For purposes of enrollment 
verification a student is considered to be enrolled full- 
time during the summer if his/her credit load totals 12 or 
more credits during both summer sessions. 



Academic Overload 

An academic/credit overload occurs when a student 
enrolls for more than 18 credits per semester (except for 
students in programs which require more than 18 credits 
per semester). In a summer session, an academic 
overload occurs when a student enrolls in more than 6 
credits at the same time. 

Students who want to schedule a credit overload must 
obtain permission from the Division Director of the 
program in which they are enrolled. 

A student must have earned a 3.00 cumulative grade 
point average or a 3.00 average the previous semester in 
order to qualify to schedule a credit overload. Exceptions 
must be approved by the Dean of Academic Affairs or 
his/her designee. 



© 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



Change of Course 

After the official registration period is over, the student 
may make adjustments in his/her schedule through the 
process of adding and/or dropping courses. 

Dropping a Course: A student may drop a credit 
course during the first three weeks — or the first 20 
percent of instruction — of the term by having his/her 
advisor complete the appropriate section of a "Student 
Status Change" form. The instructor of the course being 
dropped and the advisor must sign the form. The course 
will not appear on the student's academic record. After 
the third week (or equivalent) the student must 
withdraw from the course. (See Terminations, 
Withdrawals and Refunds, page 126.) 

Adding a Course: A student may add a course only 
during the first week of classes (two days in Summer 
Term) by having his/her advisor complete and sign the 
appropriate portion of a "Student Status Change" form. 

The approval of the appropriate Division Director and 
the Associate Dean must be obtained if a course is 
added after the first week of classes. 

Developmental courses and any related course work 
required may be dropped or added until the end of the 
third week of classes. 

The Dean of Academic Affairs or his/her designee may 
make exceptions in special circumstances. 



Change of Program 

A change of program may be made at the beginning of 
any semester. Currently enrolled students who wish to 
change from one program of study to another must 
follow the steps below. 

1. Complete an "Admission Application" and submit it to 
the Admissions Office. Acceptance into the new 
program will be based on sponsorship status and on 
the date the applicant's file is complete in the 
Admissions Office. 

2. Complete a "Curriculum/Program Change" form and 
obtain all required signatures. Submit the form to the 
Student Records Office. 



@ 



When a student changes his/her program, all credits 
earned in the prior program will be evaluated for transfer 
to the new program. All courses will appear on the 
student's transcript. Only courses applicable to the new 
program will be used to calculate the student's new 
cumulative grade point average. 



Repeating a "D" or "F" Course 

Students may repeat a course in which they earned a 
grade of "D" or "F." However, they must improve the 
grade of the repeated course to affect their cumulative 
grade point average. If the student repeats the course at 
The Williamsport Area Community College and improves 
his/her grade, both grades will appear on the permanent 
record card with the higher grade used in calculating the 
cumulative grade point average. If the student repeats 
the equivalent course at another institution and transfers 
the course to the College (subject to Transfer Policy, see 
page 7), the original grade remains on the transcript but 
is not included in the semester or cumulative average. 
(The credits for the transferred course will not be used 
in calculating the student's cumulative grade point 
average.) If the student repeats a course and earns a 
second "D" or "F", the second grade and credits will 
not be used in calculating the cumulative grade point 
average. 



Auditing a Course 

Auditors are not required to prepare lessons or papers or 
take examinations, nor do they receive credit for the 
course. Students are charged full tuition for courses 
taken on an audit basis. 

With the consent of the instructor and the Dean of 
Academic Affairs, a student may enroll as an auditor in 
any course. 

Students must inform the Student Records Office that a 
course is being taken on an audit basis when they 
schedule. A student may not change from credit to audit 
status or from audit to credit status after the beginning 
of the semester. 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



Grading System 

The College uses the following system of grading (4.00 
basis) to indicate the quality of a student's work: 



Grade 


Interpretation 


Grade Points 


A 


Superior 


4 


B 


Above Average 


3 


C 


Average 


2 


D 


Below Average 


1 


F 


Failing Work 





W 


Withdrawn 


— 


WP 


Withdrawn Passing 


— 


WF 


Withdrawn Failing 





1 


Incomplete 


— 


AU 


Audit 


— 


SP 


Satisfactory Progress 


— 



An instructor may assign an "I", Incomplete, grade to 
give a student additional time to complete required 
course work if the student has missed an exceptional 
number of classes due to accident, illness or other 
extenuating circumstances. An Incomplete will not be 
used to extend the time a student has to complete class 
requirements beyond the normal allotted time. 

If a student is awarded a letter grade of "I", the 
instructor will submit an incomplete grade form with the 
student's grade roster. The form describes the work 
which must be completed and gives a deadline for 
completing the work. The deadline date will be before 
the end of the following semester. Copies of the 
incomplete grade form will be sent to the student and 
his/her advisor. A permanent "F" will be recorded if the 
work is not completed prior to the end of the following 
semester. 

"SP", Satisfactory Progress, is used for certain students 
in Developmental Studies courses. "SP", Satisfactory 
Progress, will be awarded if students do not complete all 
course requirements but do meet the requirements for 
"SP" as established in the syllabus for a particular 
developmental course. Students earning an "SP" will re- 
enroll in the same course. Upon mastery of all course 
objectives, the student will earn a traditional letter grade 
(in the semester in which the course requirements were 
met). 



Grade Reports 

At the midpoint of each fall and spring semester course 
a grade of "P" (Passing), "D" (Deficient), or "F" 
(Failing) is reported for each student officially registered 
in each course. Each grade is advisory only, indicating 



the quality of work up to that point in the semester. 
Mid-term advisory grades do not become part of the 
student's permanent record. Final semester grades will 
be mailed after the end of the semester or summer 
session. The grade report will show all course work 
completed to date by the student. Students should 
check the cumulative grade report for accuracy and to 
be certain they are meeting graduation requirements. To 
protect the confidentiality of the student's record and in 
compliance with federal law, no grades will be given over 
the phone. 

Since the grade report is also an unofficial copy of their 
transcript, students may use their grade report when an 
unofficial transcript is required. (For information on 
obtaining official transcripts, see page 10). 



Cumulative Grade Point Average 

A student's cumulative grade point average is computed 
by dividing the number of grade points by the total 
number of credits for which the student has earned a 
grade of A, B, C, D, F, or WF. No other grades in the 
College's grading system are used in the calculation. 

The cumulative grade point average includes: 1) Credit 
for Williamsport Area Community College courses 
completed by a student currently enrolled in a degree or 
certificate program; 2) Credit for Williamsport Area 
Community College courses previously completed by a 
student who reenrolls in the same program when such 
credits are appropriate for the new program; 3) Credit 
for Williamsport Area Community College courses 
previously completed by a student who reenrolls in a 
different program when such courses are appropriate for 
the new program; 4) Credit for Williamsport Area 
Community College courses previously completed by a 
student who changes to a different program when such 
credits are appropriate for the new program; 5) Credit 
earned through cross-registration with Lycoming 
College. 

The cumulative grade point average does not include 
credits from the following: 1) CLEP exams; 2) Advanced 
Placement; 3) Credit by Exam; 4) Credit for Work/ Life 
Experience; 5) U.S. Armed Forces Institute Credit and 
Service Credit; 6) Credit transferred to The Williamsport 
Area Community College from another institution; 7) 
Credits previously earned by a student who changes to a 
different Williamsport Area Community College program 
or who reenrolls in a program when such credit does not 
meet the current requirements for the new program; 8) 
Credits for courses in which the student earned a "D" or 
"F" if the student repeats the course. If the student 



121 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



repeats the course at The Williamsport Area Community 
College and earns a higher grade, the higher grade will 
be used in calculating the cumulative grade point 
average. If the student repeats the equivalent course at 
another institution and transfers the course to The 
Williamsport Area Community College, the original grade 
remains on the transcript but is not included in the 
cumulative average. (The grade for the transferred 
course is not included in the cumulative grade point 
average.) 



Withholding Grades 

A student's grades and records will not be released if 
the student has any outstanding loans or fines (for 
example, parking fines or library fines) at the College or 
if the student has outstanding obligations to the College 
for the return/ replacement of items such as books, tools 
or equipment. When a hold is placed on a student's 
grades, the student will be notified in writing of the hold 
and of the action needed to release his/her grades or 
records. 



Advanced Placement Credit 

The Williamsport Area Community College believes that 
placing students at the proper educational level will 
contribute to the student's success in College. 

Advanced placement is designed to give students credit 
for the skills or competencies they have acquired prior to 
entering College. Students who have completed 
advanced courses in high school or an area vocational 
technical school program, as part of military training, 
and those with prior educational experiences may be 
eligible for advanced placement. We recommend that 
applications for advanced placement be submitted by 
March 15 for students who plan to enroll in the fall 
semester, by November 15 for students who plan to 
enroll in the spring semester, and by April 15 for 
students who plan to enroll in the summer semester. 

Students from area vocational technical schools with 
which the College has Task Level Articulation 
Agreements can obtain advanced placement on the 
basis of an instructor-verified list of competencies. Such 
students must also take the College's reading, English 
and math placement tests as early as possible so that 
they can take developmental courses, if needed, in the 
summer before they begin their regular program. 

New students will receive a schedule of advanced 
placement test offerings showing the date and times 




when tests will be given. The student should indicate 
which test(s) he/she wishes to take and return the form 
to the appropriate Division office. 

A copy of the evaluation of the advanced placement test 
or other assessment will be sent to the student. A fee of 
$25 per course will be charged when credit from 
advanced placement testing is entered on the 
transcript.* Credit earned through advanced placement 
will be shown on the student's transcript after the fee is 
paid and the student has successfully completed one 
semester at the College. Up to a maximum of 30 credits 
may be granted through non-traditional credit evaluation 
(advanced placement, credit by exam, and work/ life 
experience). Advanced placement credit is not used in 
calculating the student's cumulative grade point average. 
Only the course number, title, and number of credits will 
be entered on the transcript. No letter grades will be 
shown. 
*The $25 fee will not be charged secondary students 

assessed externally and for certain developmental 

courses which are exempt. 



Credit By Exam 

Students may apply to take any College course by 
examination. In order to challenge a course by 
examination, a student must have completed at least 12 
credits at The Williamsport Area Community College and 
have earned a grade point average of 2.00. Application 
to take a course by examination must be made in writing 
to the appropriate Division Director. Approval must then 
be given by the instructor(s) of the course involved and 



@ 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



the Division Director. Students who decide to challenge 
a course after enrolling in it must arrange for testing to 
take place prior to the third week of instruction (or the 
equivalent). 

If approval is granted, a fee of $25 must be paid at the 
Bursar's Office prior to each examination. No 
examination will be prepared or administered until the 
student presents the $25 receipt. The examination fee 
will be waived for students seeking credit for ENL 111 
(English Composition I) or RDG 111 (College Reading, 
Reasoning and Study Skills) as a result of outstanding 
performance in the respective developmental 
counterpart, i.e., ENL 011 (Basic English) or RDG 010 
(Reading Improvement). 

The examination is prepared, administered (at the time 
set by the Division Director), and evaluated by the 
instructor(s) of the course. A copy of the result of the 
examination will be sent to the student. When a student 
passes the examination for the course, the course 
number, title, and number of credits only will be entered 
on the student's transcript. (No letter grades will be 
listed on the transcript.) A maximum of 30 credits may 
be earned through non-traditional credit evaluation (work 
and/ or life experience, advanced placement, credit by 
exam). Credit by exam may npt be used to remove a D, 
F, or WF grade. An examination in a specific subject 
may be taken only once. All exceptions to the above 
requirements must be approved by the Dean of 
Academic Affairs or his/her designee. 



Credit for Work and/or Life Experience 

The College recognizes that many individuals acquire 
rich academic and technical experiences through 
working and/or living in a particular situation. Students 
who have been accepted to the College and who feel 
their work or living experiences warrant consideration for 
academic credit should apply in writing to the Division 
Director responsible for the course(s) involved. The 
application must include evidence and rationale for 
granting credit. 

The Division Director will appoint a committee to assess 
the candidate's educational and work background. The 
student will be asked to document his/her work and life 
experiences and to show that the experiences are equal 
to a course(s) offered at the College. The committee will 
also interview the student. The committee will 
recommend the number of credits to be awarded. A fee 
of $25 per course will be charged for the evaluation of 
credit. 



A copy of the evaluation of work and/or life experience 
will be sent to the student. Credit earned through 
work/ life experience will be shown on the student's 
transcript after he/she earns 12 credits at the College. 
Credit for work/ life experience will not be used in 
calculating the student's cumulative grade point average. 
No letter grade will be listed on the student's transcript. 
Up to a maximum of 30 credits may be earned through 
non-traditional credit evaluation (work and/or life 
experience, advanced placement, credit by exam). All 
exceptions to the above requirements must be approved 
by the Dean of Academic Affairs or his/her designee. 



Cooperative Education 

Cooperative Education (co-op) offers students the 
opportunity to participate in supervised periods of 
relevant and meaningful employment. While on co-op 
assignment, students work as regular employees of the 
co-op employer, receive vocational counseling, and earn 
academic credit for knowledge and/or skills acquired 
from their work experience. Co-op may be used to 
replace or supplement required courses in most 
programs. 

The following options are available to qualified students 
in most programs: 

1. Alternating Plan: Students rotate periods of full-time 
work and full-time on-campus study. 

2. Parallel Plan: Students work part time and attend 
regular classes during the same semester or summer 
session. 

3. Summer Plan: Students work full time during a 
summer session followed by a parallel plan co-op 
during the following semesters. 

4. Career Advancement Plan: Students attend college on 
a part-time basis while working either full or part time 
at their regular (not a "co-op") job. Designed for 
employed students. 

5. APCO Plan (Advance Placement with the Co-op 
Option): Students who have completed a related vo- 
tech program receive advanced placement and are 
encouraged to participate in part or full-time co-op 
while attending college. 

Variations of the above options are possible, depending 
upon job and College requirements. Co-op placements 
can range from eight weeks to a full semester or 
summer of 15-16 weeks. 



123 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



In order to participate in Cooperative Education, a 
student must have successfully completed a minimum of 
one full semester (12 credits) or its equivalent and must 
maintain a cumulative average of 2.00 or better. (A 2.50 
average in courses related to the student's program is 
recommended.) 

The Dean of Academic Affairs or his/her designee may 
waive these requirements in the following situations: 

1 . If the College determines that the student has 
acquired competencies — through previous training 
and/ or experience — which are equivalent to those 
provided during one full semester of instruction at the 
College. 

2. When the student's cumulative average falls below the 
level required and/or recommended due to special 
circumstances. 

A student who is unable to meet and maintain either the 
behavioral or performance standards established for co- 
op employment may, with just cause, be withdrawn 
from co-op employment by either the employer or the 
College. 

A student may withdraw or be withdrawn from co-op 
employment without penalty if — for any well-founded 
reason — the work site is deemed to be unsafe or if the 
level of work assigned does not meet the learning 
objectives established by the student and the College. 



Employer Participation 

Employers who can provide full-time or part-time 
positions which meet the following qualifications are 
encouraged to participate in the co-op program: 

1. The job must provide educational experiences in an 
area directly related to the student's course of study 
or career goals. 

2. The job must provide learning experiences that will be 
meaningful and challenging for the student. 

3. The job should be relatively secure in order to provide 
at least one or more full co-op work terms. 

4. The employer will cooperate with the College and the 
student in developing specific learning objectives for 
each work period. 



® 



5. The employer will enter into a training agreement with 
the College and the student. 

6. At the end of the work experience, the employer 
agrees to evaluate the student's performance and 
progress toward meeting specific learning objectives. 

Specific information can be obtained directly from the 
student's academic division or by contacting: 

Director of Experiential Learning 

The Williamsport Area Community College 

Room 157, Learning Resources Center 

1005 West Third Street 

Williamsport, PA 17701-5799 

Phone (717) 326-3761, ext. 239 



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Cross-Registration with Lycoming College 

The Williamsport Area Community College participates 
in a cross-registration program with Lycoming College. 
In order to cross-register for courses at Lycoming 
College, a Williamsport Area Community College student 
must obtain the permission of his/her advisor and 
division director, the Dean of Academic Affairs and the 
academic dean at Lycoming College. In order to 
participate in this program, students must: 

1. be enrolled on a full-time basis in a degree or 
certificate program. 

2. have completed at least 12 credits at The Williamsport 
Area Community College. 

3. have completed no more than 70 credits, including 
transfer credit, cross-registration credit, and non- 
traditional credit. 

4. have a current cumulative grade point average of 2.00 
or better. 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



During the fall and spring semesters, students may 
register for two courses or one-half of their total 
semester credits (whichever is greater) through cross- 
registration. During any summer session, students 
participating in cross-registration must register for at 
least three credits at The Williamsport Area Community 
College and may register for only one cross-registration 
course. 

Students may cross-register only for courses not offered 
at The Williamsport Area Community College or for 
courses unavailable before the student's scheduled date 
of graduation. Students participating in cross-registration 
will be responsible for paying any special laboratory fees 
or charges required for the course. Grades earned 
through participation in cross-registration will be 
recorded on the student's Williamsport Area Community 
College transcript. Courses completed with a passing 
grade ("D" or better) will be credited toward graduation. 
Grades earned in courses taken at Lycoming College will 
be included in the student's semester and cumulative 
average. Students who cross-register are responsible for 
complying with the academic calendar of the institution 
offering the course(s) they take. Cross-registration 
students should inform their advisors of any difficulties 
with, or plans to drop Lycoming College courses. 
Students may obtain additional information on cross- 
registration procedures from their advisors or the 
Student Records Office. All exceptions to the above 
requirements must be approved by the Dean of 
Academic Affairs or his/her designee. 



Graduation Requirements 

All entering students must exhibit competencies in the 
basic skills (reading, computation, and written 
expression) necessary for success in their programs. 
Students who have not demonstrated these 
competencies on the college placement tests are 
required to complete specific courses in order to earn a 
degree or certificate from The Williamsport Area 
Community College. 



Associate Degree 

The successful completion of a two-year program of 
study — identified as an Associate Degree program in 
this catalog — at The Williamsport Area Community 
College leads to an Associate of Applied Science, an 
Associate of Arts, or an Associate of Applied Arts 
Degree. To be eligible for an Associate Degree from The 
Williamsport Area Community College, the student is 
expected to satisfy the following: 



a. Complete courses required in a specific program of 
study as set forth in this catalog. Students may 
substitute courses with prior written permission of the 
appropriate Division Director and the Dean of 
Academic Affairs. Only courses numbered 100, 200, 
500 and 600 can be applied toward meeting 
graduation requirements for an associate degree. Only 
courses numbered 100-299 can be applied to the 
requirements for an associate degree in General 
Studies. Courses numbered 001-099, 700 and 800 
cannot be used to meet associate degree graduation 
requirements. 

b. Complete a minimum of 30 credits in courses offered 
by The Williamsport Area Community College. Credit 
earned by advanced placement, credit by examination, 
or work/ life experience may be included in the 30- 
credit minimum. A student must be enrolled in 
courses at The Williamsport Area Community College 
for at least the last 12 credit hours of a program. 

c. Earn at least a "C" average (2.00 cumulative grade 
point average) in all courses and complete all required 
courses with a grade of "D" or better. 

d. Satisfy health and physical education requirements as 
stated in a student's curriculum. A student may 
receive a waiver from physical education based upon 
the following considerations: 

1 . Age - A student must be 27 years of age or over in 
order to obtain a waiver. 

2. Military Service - The requirement may be waived if 
the student was on active duty in the Armed 
Services of the United States for a minimum of at 
least one year. (See page 8 for conditions and 
requirements.) 

3. Physical or Medical Reasons - The requirement may 
be waived because of physical or medical reasons. 
(Student must have a statement from a medical 
doctor stating explicitly the reason for the waiver.) 

e. Fulfill all financial obligations to the College (including 
payment of any fines). 



Certificates 

Certificates will be awarded for the successful 
completion of a program of study identified as a 
Certificate program in this catalog. To be eligible for a 
Certificate from The Williamsport Area Community 
College, the student is expected to satisfy the following: 

a. Complete a recommended program of study as set 
forth in this catalog. Students may substitute courses 
with prior written permission of the appropriate 
Division Director and the Dean of Academic Affairs. 



125 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



Only courses numbered 100 or above can be applied 
toward meeting graduation requirements. Courses 
numbered 001-099 cannot be used to meet graduation 
requirements. 

b. Complete at least half of the credits required, 
including the last semester, in courses offered by the 
College. This includes credit received for advanced 
placement, credit by examination, or work/ life 
experience. A student must be enrolled in courses at 
The Williamsport Area Community College for at least 
the last 12 credit hours of a program. 

c. Earn at least a "C" average (2.00 cumulative grade 
point average) in all courses and complete all required 
courses with a grade of "D" or better. 

d. Fulfill all financial obligations to the College (including 
payment of any fines). 



Additional Information 

If after completing the final semester, the student has 
not earned all the credits required for a degree or 
certificate, he/she may, with prior approval of the Dean 
of Academic Affairs or his/her designee be permitted to 
take up to six semester credit hours from another 
accredited college/institution to fulfill requirements for a 
degree or certificate from The Williamsport Area 
Community College. Such work must be completed 
within two years after the last semester in which the 
student attended classes at The Williamsport Area 
Community College. After two years, the student must 
reenroll at The Williamsport Area Community College 
(See Reenrollment and Transfer Credit, pages 6 and 7.) 
Only grades of "C" or better are acceptable for such 
transfer credit. (Grades for transfer credits are not 
included in the student's cumulative grade point 
average.) 

All exceptions to graduation requirements must be 
approved by the Dean of Academic Affairs or his/her 
designee. 

Petition to Graduate: In order to graduate a student 
must report to the Student Records Office and complete 
a "Petition for Graduation" form during the first five 
weeks of classes of the semester in which the student 
intends to graduate. If this form is not submitted, the 
student's name will not appear on the Graduation 
Program. In addition, the student's final transcript will 
state that the student is a "non-returning" student, rather 
than a graduate. 



Students who meet graduation requirements in the 
summer will graduate at the end of the second summer 
session. 



Graduation Fees 

Any students who wish to receive an engraved diploma 
or certificate when they graduate must pay a $5.00 fee 
when they petition to graduate. If a student orders a 
diploma or certificate after the advertised date for 
ordering a diploma (i.e., two months prior to the date of 
graduation), the student must pay a special processing 
fee of $10.00. 

If a graduating student does not wish to receive an 
engraved certificate or diploma, he/she will not be 
charged the graduation fee but must still file a petition. 



The Dean's Honor List 

The honor list is announced by the Dean at the 
completion of each semester. The list will include only 
those full-time students who have a semester grade 
point average of 3.50 or better. 



Terminations, Withdrawals and Refunds 

Student Termination From College 

If a student finds it necessary to terminate his/her 
enrollment at the College for any reason, the student 
must: 

1. Officially withdraw from each course by completing 
the "Student Status Change" form. 

2. If the student is also applying for a refund, the 
"Request for Refund" form must be filled out and 
submitted with the "Student Status Change" form. 

3. Satisfactorily account for all property issued by the 
College. 

4. Settle all outstanding College obligations. 

Students who do not officially terminate from the 
College in the manner described above will receive the 
grade of "F" or "WF" in all courses. 

College Termination 

The College reserves the right to terminate enrollment of 
any student or to withhold the degree of any student, if, 
in the opinion of College authorities, his/her further 



126) 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



association is not in the best interests of the student or 
the College. Specific situations in which the College may 
terminate a student include, but are not limited to: 

1. Failure to meet financial obligations. 

2. Failure to meet requirements or to complete objectives 
in a given program and/or course. 

3. Failure to demonstrate safe practices. 

Recommended procedures for appealing questions on 
academic evaluation are given in the Student Handbook. 

Withdrawal/Termination From A Course 

Student Withdrawal — After the official drop/add 
period for the term (the end of the third week or 20 
percent of instruction) until the end of the tenth week, 
or equivalent, for each term, a student may withdraw 
from a College course with a grade of "W" (unless the 
student is withdrawn from the course by the College for 
absenteeism — in which case the student will receive a 
grade of "WF"). 

If a student withdraws from a course after the tenth 
week (or equivalent), the instructor, with the approval of 
the appropriate Division Director, will award a grade of 
"WP" or "WF." No credit is given for a "WP" grade. A 
"WF" grade affects the student's grade point average in 
the same manner as an "F". If a student stops attending 
a class without officially withdrawing from the course, 
the student will receive a grade of "WF" or "F." 
Students may withdraw from courses until the last day 
of classes. 

Students must complete and submit a "Student Status 
Change" form to withdraw from a course. 

College Initiated Termination — When an instructor 
determines that a student is not adequately meeting 
course objectives and has missed more than the 
equivalent of the class hours in one week of instruction, 
the instructor MAY recommend that the student be 
withdrawn from the class by the College. The College 
will withdraw a student from a course for excessive 
absences only after the first three weeks (or 20 percent 
of instruction). A grade of "WF" will be recorded on the 
student's transcript. 

Refunds 

Charges for tuition, activity fees and service fees are 
refundable upon official withdrawal/termination from the 
College. Application fees are not refundable. A "Request 
for Refund" form can be obtained from the Bursar's 
Office. In order to obtain a refund, the "Request for 
Refund" form and the necessary "Student Status 
Change" form(s) must be submitted at the same time. 









^^ 


■^ 





Refunds of tuition and fees will be made according to 
the following schedule for fall and spring semesters: 



Prior to the first day of classes 
First day through third week 
After third week of classes 



100% Refund 

70% Refund 

No Refund 



Refunds will be made according to the following 
schedule for the summer semesters and for courses that 
do not meet for the entire semester (for example, some 
weekend college classes and "mini-courses," eight-week 
courses, etc.). 

Prior to the first day of classes 100% Refund 

First day through 20% of total 70% Refund 

instructional hours 

After 20% of total instructional hours No Refund 



Student Conduct 

On admission to The Williamsport Area Community 
College you accept unqualified commitment to conduct 
yourself at all times, both on and off the campus, in a 
responsible manner which conforms with the generally 
accepted standard of adult behavior. It is expected that 
you will show courtesy and respect for the 
administrative officers, faculty, and employees in your 
personal contacts. You must also understand and accept 
the necessity for various College regulations and comply 
with the directives of those authorized to enforce the 
regulations. If you conduct yourself in a manner contrary 
to the best interests of the College you will be subject to 
such penalties as the circumstances justify, including 
suspension or expulsion. Additional information 
regarding student conduct on campus and student 
judicial procedures is available in the Student Handbook. 
All students are expected to read and follow the policies 
in the handbook. 



© 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



A student may be suspended or dismissed for improper 
conduct, failure to comply with College regulations, 
academic dishonesty, habitual absences, lack of effort 
and interest, possession of, or being under the influence 
of alcoholic beverages or illegal drugs, or under other 
circumstances as determined by the Board of Trustees. 

In all cases where academic dishonesty is established, 
the student may be dropped from the course with a 
grade of "F". For a second offense, the student may be 
dismissed from the College. In a case involving a 
question of academic dishonesty, the professor in whose 
class the incident is alleged to have occurred will consult 
with the appropriate Division Director regarding 
disciplinary action. 



Attendance Policy 

1. Regular and prompt attendance at all classes and at 
scheduled conferences with instructors is expected of 
all students. All work missed because of absence, 
regardless of the cause, must be made up to the 
satisfaction of the instructor. Students who know that 
they will be absent are expected to get assignments 
from instructors in advance so that the necessary 
work will be completed before the student leaves, or 
immediately upon his/her return. This applies to 
absences for College activity trips as well as absences 
for other reasons. In all cases of anticipated absence, 
students should confer with their instructors in 
advance whenever possible. 

2. All faculty are required to record attendance daily. 

3. When a student, in the instructor's judgment, is not 
adequately meeting the course objectives and has 
missed more than the equivalent of the class hours 
held in one week of instruction, the instructor MAY 
recommend the student be withdrawn from class by 
the College. 

If, in the judgment of the instructor, extenuating 
circumstances are involved (e.g., a death in the 
family, hospitalization, illness, or serious accident), the 
following alternatives are available to the student. 

a. To arrange with the instructor's approval a stated 
plan for meeting course objectives and 
responsibilities. If completion of the approved plan 
extends beyond the semester, the student can 
receive an "I" grade (Incomplete). 

b. Until the end of the tenth week, or equivalent, of 
each term, the student can withdraw and receive a 
"W" grade (Withdrawn). 



@ 



4. Based upon the instructor's recommendation, a 
decision to withdraw a student from a course MAY be 
made by the appropriate Division Director. Withdrawal 
from a course by the College for excessive absences 
will only be done after the first three weeks of each 
term or 20 percent of instruction and will be recorded 
on the student's transcript as a "WF" (Withdrawn 
Failing). 

5. Appeal Process: Students who are withdrawn from a 
course by the College may appeal the decision within 
three school days of notification. 

The student may appeal the decision to either the 
Dean of Academic Affairs OR the Ad Hoc Academic 
Policy Group consisting of the Dean of Academic 
Affairs, President of the Student Government 
Association, and Chairperson of the Academic 
Standards and Policy Committee. 



Academic Probation 

Any degree or certificate candidate whose cumulative 
grade point average is below 2.00 will be placed on 
academic probation. A student on probation may be 
required to report to the Advisement and Career 
Services Center for special counseling before registering 
for classes the following semester. 

A student may be terminated from the College if his/her 
cumulative grade point average is under 1.50 at the end 
of the first semester's work, under 1 .80 at the end of the 
second semester's work, or under 1.90 at the end of the 
third semester of work. (A semester's work is generally 
defined as: 1) the courses listed for a semester in a 
given program, or 2) 15 credits of course work.) The 
Probation Committee will determine the semester status 
in special situations. 

The Probation Committee meets at the end of each 
term. The Committee determines the conditions under 
which students with grade point averages below 2.00 
will be permitted to continue at the College. The 
Committee may also terminate students. Students who 
are terminated may appeal the action to the Chairperson 
of the Probation Committee or his/her designee. 



Final Examinations 

Final examinations may be scheduled by instructors at 
the end of each semester. A student who is absent from 
a final examination without good reason is subject to a 
failing grade. 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 




Developmental Studies Program 

The open admissions policy of The Williamsport Area 
Community College permits most students to enroll in 
the programs of their choice. However, all entering 
students must exhibit competencies in the basic skills 
(reading, mathematics, and written expression) 
necessary for success in their programs. Students who 
have not demonstrated these skills on the college 
placement tests must take specific developmental 
courses before enrolling in other math and English 
courses required for a degree or certificate from The 
Williamsport Area Community College. 

The College will award institutional credit for 
developmental studies courses (courses numbered 
001-099) and the grades earned in those courses will be 
included in the student's grade point average. Three 
developmental courses — RDG 111, CHD 100, and CHD 
101— carry elective credit and may be used to fulfill a 
general elective requirement. Developmental courses 
with institutional credit may not replace any course 
requirement or elective. 

The Developmental Studies program is designed to serve 
a variety of students: 

— those who lack academic skills and requirements for 
the curriculum of their choice 

—the "non-traditional" student 

— unemployed adults 

— adults returning to school after a number of years of 
absence 



— high school dropouts 

— veterans 

— those students referred to the program by instructors 
who recognize a need for one or more of the 
program's services 

— those who require assistance and solicit the program 
services on a "walk-in" basis. 

The program consists of courses in math, reading, 
English, personal development and decision-making. 

Students may enter the entire program or part of it as 
the result of counseling, placement tests, academic 
record, or personal choice. While in the program, most 
students will also take courses in their curriculum. One 
strength of the program is the frequent contact with 
staff who assist the student with course selection, 
problem solving, decision making, career planning. 

Classwork is designed to promote a successful teaching- 
learning atmosphere. Varied learning strategies, 
individualized and self-paced instruction, small group 
sessions, tutorial and media support are characteristic of 
the course work. 



College Opportunity Programming 
(COPing) 

This program, funded under the Equal Education 
Opportunity legislation, Act 101, serves students who 
are academically and financially disadvantaged. COPing 
students are chosen on the basis of their academic 
potential, motivation and aspirations. Students receive 
counseling and tutoring assistance as part of the COPing 
program. 

The COPing Program also includes a four-week summer 
orientation. Students are in classes for two weeks, 
studying reading, math and English, and in shops and 
labs for two weeks, acquiring "hands-on" experience. 
During the four-week program, students learn about the 
campus, the College, the staff, the faculty, and each 
other. This pre-college session makes the first semester 
easier and more meaningful for students. 

For additional information on either the Developmental 
Studies Program or College Opportunity Programming, 
contact: 

Director of Developmental Studies/Act 101 
The Williamsport Area Community College 
1005 West Third Street 
Williamsport, PA 17701-5799 
(717)326-3761, ext. 266 



129 



CENTER FOR 

LIFELONG 

EDUCATION 



The Center for Lifelong Education provides a variety of 
educational opportunities and services that complement 
the College's traditional degree and certificate 
programming. 

Designed primarily to meet the educational needs of 
adults, the Center for Lifelong Education offers hundreds 
of vocational, avocational, and personal enrichment 
courses throughout the year. These courses are taught 
on the College's central campus in Williamsport as well 
as at satellite locations throughout the College's service 
area. 

Most of the courses offered through the Center for 
Lifelong Education are non-credit. They do not involve 
formal testing, do not offer grades, and may not be 
used to fulfill requirements in any of the College's credit 
programs. They do offer students the opportunity to 
learn new skills, upgrade existing capabilities, develop 
increased knowledge, or participate in new experiences 
or activities. 




(§) 



Specialized courses are also available through the 
Center. Specific courses can be custom-designed to 
meet the training needs of individual businesses and 
industries. Continuing professional education courses are 
offered for those who require such courses in order to 
maintain licensure or certification. Trips and a variety of 
outdoor experiences are available through the 
Wilderness Adventure Program. The educational needs 
of senior citizens are met through participation in 
ELDERHOSTEL and the development of special courses 
and programs. Community service workshops and 
forums are also presented when there is a need to 
address specific topics which interest the residents in the 
College's service area. 

The services available through the Center for Lifelong 
Education reflect its commitment to adult students. The 
Center is open from 8 a.m. until 8 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday and from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. on Friday 
during the fall and spring semesters. The Center also 
serves as a testing site for professional examinations. 

All of the programs and services available through the 
Center are financially self-sustaining. The Center does 
not receive any financial support from the College's 
sponsoring districts. Nevertheless, all courses and 
services are modestly priced and are very competitive 
with those offered by other institutions. 

The primary goal of the Center for Lifelong Education is 
to provide high quality, low cost educational 
opportunities and services — in locations that are 
accessible — at times that are convenient. For more 
information or to discuss your educational needs, please 
visit the Center for Lifelong Education in Room 102 of 
the Academic Center. If you prefer, you may call the 
Center at 327-4768. You will receive a warm reception 
and competent assistance. 



The Center for Business and Industrial 
Advancement 

The Center for Business and Industrial Advancement is 
part of the College's non-credit programming operation. 
The Center's mission is to: a) coordinate the College's 
contacts with area business and industry, b) identify 
their educational and training needs, and c) develop and 
implement programs and services designed to meet 
those needs. 

The Center for Business and Industrial Advancement 
reflects the College's commitment to playing a major 
role in the development of a viable economic future for 
the region. The Center is designed to serve as a 
resource for existing businesses and industries as well as 
new companies relocating in the area. For more 
information on services available through the Center, 
please call the Coordinator of the Center for Business 
and Industrial Advancement at (717) 327-4768. 



SECONDARY 

VOCATIONAL 

PROGRAM 



The Williamsport Area Community College is the only 
community college in the state to offer secondary 
vocational education. The College's Secondary 
Vocational Program is a unique example of what school 
districts and a community college can provide for their 
students and their communities. 

The Secondary Vocational Program at The Williamsport 
Area Community College provides education and training 
to high school students who want to prepare for 
employment following graduation as well as those who 
plan to pursue advanced education or training. High 
school students enrolled in the program spend one-half 
of the school year (on a nine-week alternating schedule) 
at their home high schools where they complete the 
academic courses required for high school graduation 
and half the school year attending vocational/technical 
classes at the College. 

The Secondary Vocational Program offers a combination 
of classroom work and practical experience. Students 
work in the College's shops and labs to learn and 
practice the skills they will need when they begin 
working. Senior year students may gain additional 
experience through participation in the cooperative 
education program. 















1 ^^ 




^ 





Graduates who want to continue their education at the 
college-level in the same field of study may be granted 
advanced placement credit for the skills and 
competencies acquired in the program. 

The College also provides a Senior Year Options 
program for high school students. This program offers 
qualifying students the opportunity to begin college-level 
work in selected technical programs as high school 
seniors. 

PROGRAMS 

Auto Body Repair 

Automotive Mechanics 

Aviation Maintenance Technician 

Carpentry 

Cooperative Education (CAPSTONE) 

Cosmetology 

Drafting - Architectural/ Mechanical 

Electrical Construction 

Forestry 

Health Assistant 

Horticulture 

Machine Shop 

Quantity Foods Production and Service 

Small Engine Repair 

Welding 

SENIOR YEAR OPTIONS 

Agribusiness 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Operator 

Dairy Herd Management 

Electronics Technology 

SPONSOR SCHOOL DISTRICTS 

Canton Area 
East Lycoming 
Jersey Shore Area 
Keystone Central 
Loyalsock 
Millville Area 
Montgomery Area 
Montoursville Area 
South Williamsport Area 
Sullivan County 
Warrior Run 
Wellsboro Area 
Williamsport Area 

For information on this program, contact the Director of 
Secondary Vocational Programs at (717) 327-4773, or 
write to the Office of Secondary Vocational Programs at 
the College. 



131 



COMMENCEMENT 
AWARDS 




Commencement awards give public recognition of 
achievement in various areas accompanied by cash 
awards in varying amounts. 

ACCOUNTING FACULTY AWARD for outstanding 
achievement in accounting to a non-transfer student on 
the basis of academic standing. Selected by the 
accounting faculty. 

ANCHOR/DARLING VALVE AWARD for scholastic 
achievement in a certificate program in applied arts and 
sciences. 

AVCO AWARD for scholastic achievement in humanities 
and social sciences. 

LEWIS H. BARDO MEMORIAL AWARD to a student 
who exemplifies the ideals of Lewis H. Bardo (devotion to 
duty, helpfulness to others, friendliness, high ideals). 

DALE RUSS BERG AWARD for proficiency in the 
operation and use of heavy equipment. 

ELLEN HARDING BERRY NURSING AWARD presented 
to the student who has displayed outstanding scholastic 
achievement and exceptional ability in practicum and 
communication skills. 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT FACULTY AWARD 
presented to a management student for achievement in 
the field of study, for leadership qualities shown and 
cooperation with faculty and peers. 

CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA CHAPTER OF CHARTERED 
LIFE UNDERWRITERS' AWARD to an outstanding 
student in the two-year associate degree program in the 
Business and Computer Technologies Division who shows 
promise in the insurance field. 



132 



CLINTON ELECTRIC SUPPLY COMPANY, 
INCORPORATED, AWARD for outstanding electrical 
student. 

THE COMPUTER SCIENCE FACULTY AWARDS to two 
outstanding students in the Computer Science Program 
who have excelled in the program and who have 
exhibited those qualities of leadership, friendship, 
cooperation, and dedication that will make him/her a 
valuable addition to the profession. One award will be 
given to a two-year Computer Information Systems 
Degree student and one to a one-year Computer Operator 
Certificate student. 

DEANS' AWARD for scholastic achievement and service 
to the College. 

DENTAL HYGIENE FACULTY AWARD to the student 
who demonstrates the most dedication to the program. 

DENTAL HYGIENE FACULTY AWARD to the student 
who demonstrates the most improvement in professional 
growth. 

ELIZABETH R. DOWNS AWARD for secretarial 
proficiency. 

LOUIS S. EISEMAN BUSINESS AWARD to an 
outstanding graduating student in Business Management 
or Retail Management who has achieved above average 
competencies and has demonstrated leadership and 
concern for others. 

FORKLIFTS, INCORPORATED, AWARD given to a 
graduating cooperative education student in the Service 
and Operation of Heavy Construction Equipment Program 
who has demonstrated superior competencies in the 
service area. 

GAMMA EPSILON TAU FRATERNITY AWARD to the 
student in the Graphic Arts Program who exhibits 
outstanding development in skill, capability and 
leadership, and a willingness to help others. 

THE DR. CLARKE J. HOLLISTER MEMORIAL AWARD 
to the graduating student of Dental Hygiene who has 
displayed outstanding interest and accomplishment in the 
area of patient education. 

HU-FRIEDY GOLDEN SCALER AWARD for outstanding 
student achievement in the Dental Hygiene program. 

KEELER-HOFF SUPPLY COMPANY AWARD, in 
memory of the late Samuel H. Hoff, for his understanding 
and appreciation of the need for plumbing and heating 
tradespeople to be able to use mathematics effectively 
and accurately in the application of their craft, to the 
graduating student in plumbing and heating who excelled 
in related mathematics and attended college under 
exceptional conditions. 

DAVID LETSCHER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 
AWARD to a student in the Computer Information 
Systems program at The Wil/iamsport Area Community 
College based on the following criteria: scholastic 
achievement, leadership ability, and dedication as 
exhibited by David Letscher. The recipient is selected by 
the Computer Information Systems faculty and the award 
is donated by the West Branch Data Processing 
Association. 



LIQUID CARBONIC CORPORATION AWARD to a 
graduating Welding student who has demonstrated 
superior ability and an outstanding attitude. 

LYCOMING COUNTY DENTAL SOCIETY AWARD to 
the student who has obtained the highest scholastic 
standing for the prescribed years of Dental Hygiene study. 

LYCOMING RADIOLOGY ASSOCIATES, LTD. AWARD 
for the student who most nearly exemplifies the ideals of 
selflessness, unusual devotion to duty, sensitivity to the 
patient's comfort and needs, and service to colleagues, 
patients and the hospital beyond the ordinary. 

THE JACK MINNIER ACHIEVEMENT AWARD IN 
BUSINESS to a graduate of the Business and Computer 
Technologies Division who earned at least a 3.00 
cumulative grade point average and who exhibits personal 
achievement, personal perseverance, poise, personality, 
and leadership qualities. 

THE EWING W. MUESELER AWARD for the student 
showing the highest degree of proficiency in the Diesel 
Program. 

THE NORTH CENTRAL DENTAL HYGIENISTS' 
ASSOCIATION AWARD to the student who exhibits the 
greatest enthusiasm and commitment to the Dental 
Hygiene Program. 

THE NORTHERN CENTRAL BANK ANNUAL AWARD 
to a graduating student in the two-year Computer 
Information Systems Associate Degree curriculum based 
on the following criteria: the student (11 must plan to 
enter the data processing field, (2) must have 
demonstrated excellence in programming and other data 
processing curriculum, (31 must have maintained an above 
average total scholastic achievement, and (4) must have 
demonstrated a high degree of leadership ability. 

PENNSYLVANIA INSTITUTE OF CERTIFIED PUBLIC 
ACCOUNTANTS' AWARD for excellence in accounting 
studies under criteria set forth by the Pennsylvania 
Institute of Certified Public Accountants in the Business 
and Computer Technologies Division. 

PENNSYLVANIA PLUMBING, HEATING, AND 
COOLING CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION AWARD for 
excellence in Plumbing. 

PENNSYLVANIA PLUMBING, HEATING, AND 
COOLING CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION AWARD for 
excellence in Heating. 

PENN-YORK LUMBERMEN'S AWARD for outstanding 
citizenship and interest in management and wise use of 
forest resources. 

PHI BETA LAMBDA FRATERNITY AWARD for 
performance and dedication to the fraternity. 

PRESIDENT'S AWARD for leadership and service to the 
college community. 

PULLMAN POWER PRODUCTS AWARD for scholastic 
achievement in an associate degree program in applied 
arts and sciences. Industrial Technology Division. 

MILTON H. SCHULTZ AWARD to the Plumbing and 
Heating student who excelled in related soldering and 
welding skills. 



SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE AWARD presented to 
the Dairy Herd Management student who has performed 
the course work in an exemplary manner and has 
exhibited a consistently positive attitude. 

HELEN A. SMITH AWARD presented to the nursing 
student who has shown extraordinary achievement in 
theory, practicum and personal growth. 

CHAPTER 49 OF THE SOCIETY OF MANUFACTURING 
ENGINEERS (SME) AWARD a certificate of merit to the 
SME student-member who has contributed most to the 
advancement of manufacturing education. 

ROSE STAIMAN MEMORIAL AWARD to the student 
who fulfills the following requirements of brotherhood, 
service to college and community, and scholastic 
achievement. 

WILLIAM J. STITZEL MEMORIAL AWARD for the 
graduate from the heavy construction equipment 
department who best exemplifies William J. Stitzel's 
dedication and service to the College and the student 
body. 

ROBERT G. THOMAS AWARD for the graduating 
student who has attained the highest cumulative average 
in welding. 

TRUSTEES' AWARD for achievement under exceptional 
conditions (awarded to two students). 

U. A. LOCAL NO. 810 PLUMBERS AND 
STEAMFITTERS AWARD to a graduating student in 
plumbing and heating, residing in the Local No. 810 
membership area, who has shown a strong interest and 
desire to become a member of the Plumbers and 
Steamfitters Local No. 810. 

WALL STREET JOURNAL STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT 
AWARD to that graduating student demonstrating 
superior achievement in business administration. 

THE WEST BRANCH RADIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATES 
AWARD to an outstanding graduate student of the 
Radiologic Technology Associate Degree program who 
has demonstrated high scholastic achievement, 
competence in and dedication to the profession, and a 
caring attitude toward all people. 

WORD PROCESSING FACULTY AWARD presented to 
the word processing student who has demonstrated the 
highest level of proficiency in the operation of word 
processing equipment and who has exhibited the 
characteristics of an ideal employee. 



133 



ADVISORY 
COMMITTEES 




GENERAL ADVISORY BOARD 



E. VAN ANDERSON/Vice President, Grit Publishing Company 
ROBERT M. BURNS/Chairman, Muncy Area Community Revitalization 

Committee 
LUTHER M. ERTEL/ President, Nippon Panel Company 
MICHAEL R. J. FELIX/Williamsport City Council and Director of CHIP 
RICHARD C. HAAS/Controller, Montour Auto Service Company 
WILLIAM W. JUDSON, M.D. 
PAUL D. LESSARD/President, Q.R.P. Inc. 
CHARLES J. LYDON/Senior Vice President, Commonwealth Bank a 

Trust Co., N.A. 
DAVID A. McGARVEY/Owner, B&S Picture Frames, Inc. 
ANN S. PEPPERMAN/Attorney, McNerney, Page, Vanderlin & Hall 
PHILLIP A. PETTER/ Merchandising Manager, Reliable Furniture 

Galleries 
SHERMAN R. REIGLE/Superintendent, Hermance Machine Company 
MARGARETTA STEWART 
JOSEPH E. WENTZLER/Owner, Wentzler's Fruit Farms 

NORTH CAMPUS 

RALPH C. ANTRIM, JR. /Administrator, Soldiers and Sailors Memorial 

Hospital 
JAMES DUNHAM/Dunham's Stores 
RALPH ELY/ Plant Manager, GTE Sylvania 
RICHARD W. FORD/Vice President, Commonwealth Bank and Trust 

Company 
WILLIAM K. FRANCIS/ President, Citizens and Northern Bank 
CRAIG HORTON/ABC Gaines 

CLINT KREITNER/President, American Information Systems 
DR. BONELYN KYOFSKI/Mansfield University 
JACK LEWIS/Wellsboro Chamber of Commerce 
ROBERT McCONNELL, SR. /Farming Business 



'Graduate of The Williamsport Area Community College 



@ 



ADVISEMENT AND CAREER SERVICES 

MARILYN BEAR/ Pennsylvania Power and Light Company 

HELEN BRINK/ Retired Guidance Counselor 

EDWARD W. CLAUDIUS/Guidance Counselor, Montoursville Area 

High School 
MARY JANE EVENDEN 
WAYNE FAUSNAUGHT/Supervisor of Guidance and Counseling, 

Williamsport Area School District 
DAVID FRANKLIN/Executive Director, Lycoming Association for the 

Blind 
COZY ROBINSON/Teacher 

RHONA WILK/Ombudsman, Williamsport Hospital 
MICHAEL J. WILT/ Director, Lysock View Nursing Home 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

AL CLAPPS/Manager, Burger King 

RALPH EVANS/Owner, Ralph's Ford Service Center 

ARTHUR L. FRY/Personnel Director, Pennsylvania Department of 

Transportation 
JOSEPH GIUNTA/ Manager, Industrial Relations, Stroehmann Brothers 

Company 
RONALD HAMPTON/Supervisor of Computer Programming, Sprout- 

Waldron Division, Koppers Company, Inc. 
SAMUEL HOFF, JR. /Owner, Keeler-Hoff Supply Company 
CHRISTOPHER S. LUTZ/Service Technician, Fowler Motors 
ELERY W. NAU/Hardware and Electrical Supplier 
LINDA WHALEY/ Secretary, The Williamsport Area Community 

College* 
BONNIE WHEELAND/Executive Director, Lycoming County Chapter, 

American Red Cross 
ALLEN WOLESLAGLE/Branch Manager, Forklifts, Inc. 

COPING (ACT 1011/DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES 

EDWARD CLAUDIUS/Guidance Counselor, Montoursville Area High 

School 
MICHAEL WILT/ Director, Lysock View Nursing Home 
COLLEGE FACULTY/One representative from each academic division 

BUSINESS AND COMPUTER TECHN0L06IES 

Accounting 

R. A. FLANIGAN Ill/Partner, Eberhart and Flanigan, Certified Public 

Accountants 
JEFF HOYT/ Controller, Williamsport National Bank 
BARRY STIGER/ Branch Manager and Area Administrator, 

Commonwealth Bank and Trust Company 
LEE A. VIARD/Tax Consultant 

Business Management 

JOHN ALBARANO/ President, Albarano Construction Company 
DONALD KARAFFA/ Plant Manager, Philips ECG, Inc. 
JACK MINNIER/Communications Systems Consultant, AT&T 

Communications* 
TERRY L. NEUBOLD/Chief Executive Officer/ Treasurer, The Hartman 

Agency, Inc. 

Computer Information Systems 

PETER M. CODISPOTI/Senior Systems Analyst, C.A. Reed Division of 

Westvaco 
RONALD FENTON/Systems Manager, Woolrich Woolen Mills 
TIMOTHY GUYER/ Divisional MIS Director, The West Company 
FRITZ HOCKMAN/Controller, DP Manager, Chemcoat 
HENRY KLEIN/ Manager, Data Processing, Chemcut Corporation 
DICK LUDWIG/ Computer Operations Manager, Commonwealth Bank 

and Trust Co., N.A. 
RAY LYNCH/Manager, Data Processing, Pullman Power Products 
MARVIN MENNE/Data Processing Manager, Northern Central Bank 

and Trust 
BLAINE E. MOYER/Senior Vice President of Operations Division, 

Northern Central Bank and Trust 



WAYNE MOYER/ Supervisor MIS Technical Services, Koppers, Sprout 

Waldron 
CHRIS RAGER/Vice President of Data Processing, Williamsport 

National Bank 
GLEN WENTZEL/Vice President, Finance, Cenpro, Inc. 
KEITH WOODCOCK/ Systems Analyst, American Home Foods 

Retail Management 

ELIZABETH A. BORDEN/Lewisburg Builders Supply 
CAROL SMITH /Director, Lycoming Mall Association 
DORIS STABINGAS/Sears, Roebuck and Company 
JOHN TROISI/Troisi Men's Wear 

Secretarial Office Administration 

WILLIAM KNECHT/Attorney 

ANNE MARIE McDERMOTT RAY/Public Information Coordinator, The 

Williamsport Hospital 
DR. MARY SCHWEIKLE/Physician 
LINDA WHALEY/ Secretary, The Williamsport Area Community 

College* 

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 
Air Conditioning/Refrigeration 

CHARLES A. DINSMORE/Manager, Refrigeration and Store Service, 

Weis Markets, Inc. 
GLENN GOODFELLOW/ Manager, Service Training Center, William 

Bynum Education Center 
ROBERT F. GUNNS/ Energy Management Consultant, Pennsylvania 

Power and Light Company 
GEORGE LaVELLE 
JOHN LEIPHART/Training Director, Electronics and Service Areas, 

York Division of Borg Warner 
THOMAS A. QUEITZSCH/Engineered Machinery, York Division, Borg- 

Warner Corporation 
RICHARD SPEACHT 

JAMES STUCK/ Stuck Equipment Company 
JOHN VARGO/Nutech Engineering Services, Inc. 

Architectural Technology 

ARTHUR ANDERSON/Assistant Professor, The Pennsylvania State 

University 
DR. JUNE BASKIN/ Director of Art, Williamsport Area School District 
ROSS BIGELOW/ Student 
THOMAS B. BROWN/Assistant Professor, Architectural Engineering, 

The Pennsylvania State University 
SAM DORNSIFE/lnterior Decorator 
PAUL FRIES/Architect 
JOHN E. HOFFMAN/Architect 
EARL MOWREY/ Contractor* 
JEFF SMITH 
FRANK SULLIVAN/ Director, Potter County Planning Commission 

Building Construction Technology/Construction Carpentry 

RONALD L. CARNS/Carns Brothers, Inc. 
CHARLES D. FIANTACA/CDF Home Improvements 
JEFFREY FINKE/Carpenter, Lundy Construction Company 
FRANCIS B. LORSON/Partner, Lorson and Lorson Building 

Contractors 
CHARLES A. SHIPTON/ President, C. A. Shipton, Inc. Building 

Contractors 
CARL E. SNYDER/Secretary, G. C. Corporation 
MAX M. THOMAS/General Superintendent, Lundy Construction 

Company 
ROBERT WOOLCOCK/ Pennsylvania Power and Light Company 

Electrical Occupations 

HARRY FISLER/Manager, Conservation Services, Pennsylvania Power 

and Light Company 
GARY GABLE/ Paul Gable and Sons Electric, Inc. 
ALAN KAUFMAN/ Plant Engineer, Shop-Vac Craftool Company 
GUY KOSER/President, Koser Electric Company 
DAVID KRANZ/ Inspector, Middle Department Inspection Agency 



MICHAEL LECCE/ Owner, Lecce Electric Company 

DARYL MARDEN/Jersey Shore Steel Company 

ELERY NAU/ Hardware and Electrical Supplier 

JOHN PRESTON/Operating Manager, Pennsylvania Power and Light 

Company 
CARL SMOLLINGER/Bethlehem Steel Corporation 
RANDALL WRIGHT/Wright Sign Company 

Electrical Technology 

VIRGIL COLAVITTI/Proctor and Gamble, Charmin Plant 

CHERYL DESMOND/Honeywell, Inc." 

JOHN HOUGH/ Retired Professor, The Williamsport Area Community 

College 
KIM KONYAR/ Litton Industries 

ANGELO MARTINOZZI/Avco Corporation, Lycoming Division 
CARLTON POLK/GTE Sylvania, Inc. 
JACK SHAFFER/Avco Corporation, Lycoming Division 
JOHN TYLER/GTE Sylvania, Inc. 

Plumbing and Heating 

PETER AXEMAN, JR. /Axeman Anderson Boiler 

ROBERT L. BERKHEIMER/Executive Director, PAPHCC 

HAROLD J. CARPENTER/ Business Manager, Local 810, Plumbers and 

Steam Fitters Union 
MICHAEL CELLINE/Montour Auto Service Company 
JOHN F. ENGEL/Plumbers and Steam Fitters Union 
MARK HELBLEY/General Manager, Sunbank Solar Corporation 
SAMUEL R. HOFF/ President and Treasurer, Hoff Supply Company 
RON PAJOR/Manufacturing Representative, Mechanical Products 
WADE PUGH/R. A. Munder Company, Inc. 

MICHAEL STEINBACHER/Service Manager, Montour Auto Service 
LESTER WOLFGANG/Williamsport Plumbing and Heating Company 

HEALTH SCIENCES 

Dental Hygiene 

DR. GEORGE DURRWACHTER/Orthodontist 

DR. ROBERT ECKER/Private Practice 

DR. ROBERT FREDRICKSON/ Private Practice 

SANDRA NOLAN/ District Dental Hygienist, Pennsylvania Department 

of Health 
PAMELA PARKS/ Dental Hygienist 
DR. JEFFERSON PORTER/Private Practice 
DAVID TULE/Dental Hygienist* 
DR. MENDAL VANVALIN/ Private Practice 
DR. DANIEL WURSTER/Private Practice 

Food and Hospitality Management/Dietetic Technician 

JOAN R. ALKIRE/ Registered Dietitian, The Williamsport Hospital 

HARVEY BOATMAN/Owner-Manager, Rinella Produce Company 

RICHARD BURICK* 

AL CLAPPS/Owner-Manager, Burger King 

LINDA CLAWSON/ Proprietor, Sip and Dip Bakery* 

MARY GIONTA/Assistant Chef, Inn at Turkey Hill* 

MICHAEL GOODERAU/Manager, Penn-Wells Hotel 

BOB HAM/Country Cupboard, Inc. 

SISTER VINCENT HUBER/Registered Dietitian, Divine Providence 

Hospital 
DR. SANDRA LINCH/Chairperson, Home Economics Department, 

Mansfield University 
CECILIA MCLAUGHLIN, R.D./Food Service Director, Williamsport 

Area School District 
LORRAINE MANLEY/Food Service Supervisor, Leader Nursing Home 
DAVID MIELE/Owner, Hillside Restaurant 
LEE NEWSWANGER/Unit Manager, Pizza Hut* 
VIOLA PFLEEGOR/Food Service Director, Methodist Home* 
PEGGY STOUFFER/Home Economics Instructor, Williamsport High 

School 
TRUDY WELSHANS/Owner-Manager, Hotel Mohawk 



"Graduate of The Williamsport Area Community College 



@ 



Practical Nursing 

NANCY BERGESEN, R.N. /Director of Nursing Service, Divine 

Providence Hospital 
MARY FENTON, R.N. /Administrator, Leader Nursing Home 
KIM FISHER, R.N. /Quality Assurance Coordinator, Department of 

Nursing, The Williamsport Hospital 
DORIS HEIM, R.N. 
JANICE HOFER, L.P.N. 
GREGORY MEREDITH, R.N. /Director of Nursing Service, Muncy 

Valley Hospital 
SANDY OLSON/lnterim Director of Nursing, The Williamsport 

Hospital 
MICHALINE SWANKOSKI, R.N. /Director of Nursing Service, Lock 

Haven Hospital 

Radiography 

ROBERT ALBAN/Technologist, Divine Providence Hospital 

SISTER AUGUSTA/Technologist, Divine Providence Hospital 

WILLIAM BANNON/Student 

FRANK ELLIS/Technologist, The Williamsport Hospital 

KARON KEITH/Technologist, Jersey Shore Hospital 

CAROL MUTHLER/Technologist, Lock Haven Hospital 

DR. HARSHAD PATEL/ Radiologist, Divine Providence Hospital 

THOMAS SCHNARS/Technologist, The Williamsport Hospital 

DR. GORDON SHAW/ Radiologist, The Williamsport Hospital 

KAREN SNYDER/Technologist, Divine Providence Hospital 

Surgical Technology 

NANCY E. BERGESEN, R.N. /Director of Nursing, Divine Providence 

Hospital 
DR. MICHAEL BUMAGIN/Plastic Surgeon 
SUSANNE CRESS, R.N., C.N.O.R. /Patient Care Coordinator, Divine 

Providence Hospital 
SISTER EMILENE/ Administrator, Divine Providence Hospital 
BARBARA HRINYA, R.N. /The Williamsport Hospital 
CHARLOTTE RATKE, C.O.R.T., /Surgical Assistant 
PATRICIA SOLLEY, R.N., C.N.O.R. /Assistant Director of Nursing, 

Special Care Units, Divine Providence Hospital 
DR. WILLIAM TODHUNTER/Thoracic and General Surgeon 
KATHY WERTZ, R.N. /Surgical Assistant 
MARY LOUISE WOLFE, R.N. /Director of Operating Room, The 

Williamsport Hospital 

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

Civil Technology 

ROBERT W. FERRELL, JR. /Civil Engineer 

TED FRANKLIN/Land Surveyor 

CLIFTON A. FRY, JR. /U.S. Geological Survey 

DIANA HUGGINS* 

DR. JAI KIM/Bucknell University 

GENE KREAMER/Student 

STEPHEN RETORICK/ Production Manager, Williamsport Fabricators 

CHARLES RUSSO/ Construction Inspector 

ROBERT H. SMITH/Retired Instructor 

PAUL SOLOMON/Soils Engineer, Pennsylvania Department of 

Transportation 
DONALD WILBUR/Chief Photogrammetry and Surveys, Pennsylvania 

Department of Transportation 

Drafting Technologies 

MICHAEL BECKMAN/Alcan Cable Company 

RAYMOND BOWER/Young Industries 

WILLIAM BUSSLER 

WESLEY CARSON/Student 

JAY DAWES/ Chief Draftsman, Anchor Darling Valve Company 

SCOTT ISENBERG/AMP Inc. 

DANIEL J. METZGER/ Student 

SAM MILLER/Kennedy Van Saun 

TIMOTHY SAIRES/Keeler Dorr-Oliver 

WILLIAM TUTTLE/GTE Products 



® 



Electronics Technology 

JAMES HAMILTON/IBM 
DONALD HILL/ Divine Providence Hospital 
KURT HUNTER/GTE Sylvania, Inc. 
FREDERICK KENDIG/GTE Products Division 
RICHARD PASCO/ Litton Industries 
EDWARD VIBERT/GTE Sylvania, Inc. 
KATHY WEHR/GTE Products Division 

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist Geneal 

RICHARD BAKER/Marathon Carey McFall 

JERRY BURKE/GTE Sylvania 

MICHAEL CERVINSKY/Avco-Lycoming 

PAUL COLEMAN/ DuPont Connector Systems 

JOSEPH GEHRET/Norcen Industries 

RAYMOND MARSHALEK/ Fairfield Manufacturing 

RAY MATTIE/M and S Conversion 

LEHMAN MYERS/ Litton Industries 

CHUCK RATH/Spong and Company 

SHERMAN REIGLE/Hermance Machine Company 

RICHARD SCHMIDT/lngersoll Rand 

STERLING SLUSSER/American Home Foods 

KEN SMITH/Sprout-Waldron Division, Koppers Company, Inc. 

Welding 

FRANK BARTOLOMEO/Superintendent, E. Keeler Company 

MERRILL BLOOM 

JAMES CARPENTER/ Local 810, Plumbers and Steam Fitters Union 

LYNN CRIST/Young Industries 

GARY DARRIN/ United Chemco Company 

ROBERT EFFEN/Ferno tile Division, Ferno-Washington, Inc. 

LIONEL FORTIER/Welding Engineer, Anchor Darling Valve 

GEORGE GEISE/Kennedy Van Saun 

WILLIAM McCLEAN/Grumman Allied, Inc. 

WILLIAM MILLS/Decker-Follmar Welding Company 

ROBERT SHANDRY/Williamsport Fabricators 

PHIL SNYDER 

ALEX STAVISKY/Koppers-Sprout Waldron 

EMERSON SWINEHART/Piper Aircraft, Retired 

WILLIAM YOST/A. C. and F. Industries 

INTEGRATED STUDIES 

Advertising Art/Technical Illustration 

MAX AMEIGH/Educator, Craftsman, Artist 

DAVID BOWEN/ Photographic Illustrator, Becker and Bowen 

Associates 
FREDERICK GILMOUR/Executive Director, The Williamsport Area 

Community College Foundation, Inc. 
MARK JONES/Graphic Artist, Designer, The Williamsport Area 

Community College 
JAMES MAULE/ Manager, Penn Central Advertising, Inc. 
VIRGINIA ULMER/Commercial Artist, BroDart, Inc.* 

Broadcasting 

IRVING BERNDT/ Retired Broadcasting Instructor, The Williamsport 

Area Community College 
VANESSA HUNTER/News Director, WLYC-WILQ, Williamsport 
WENDY KEEFER/News Director, WSQV, Jersey Shore 
WILLIAM KEEN/Sports Director, WLYC-WILQ, Williamsport* 
HARRIS LIPEZ/Board Secretary, WBPZ, Lock Haven 
W. WILLIAM OTT/Manager, WWPA, Williamsport 
CAREY SIMPSON/Manager, WTRN, Tyrone 

Graphic Arts/Printing 

NICHOLAS DEMKO/Prep Department, Reed Hann Litho 
DICKSON DYER/Salesman, Penn Graphics Supply Company Inc. 
JAMES MUCHLER/Bucknell University 
JANET ROBINSON/Sun Area Vocational-Technical School 
JAMES WITHER/ Department Chairman, Williamsport Area School 
District 



Human Service 

MICHAEL J. BRENNAN/Rehabilitation Manager, Office of Vocational 

Rehabilitation 
DR. ROBERT CONROY/Hope Enterprises, Inc. 
JOHN ENGLE/ Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole 
PATRICIA ESSIP/Assistant Director, Lycoming/Clinton Bi-County 

Office of the Aging 
SALLY FRANZ/Wise Options for Women 
PAUL D. GROSS/Tioga County Board of Assistance, Wellsboro 
JOHN T. KON I ECZNY/ Executive Director, West Branch Drug and 

Alcohol Abuse Commission 
TIM MAHONEY/ Lycoming County Prison Work Release Center 
DR. LARUE MONTANYE/ Lycoming/ Clinton Counties Mental 

Health/ Retardation Program 
KAREN POLT/Endless Mountains Treatment Center, Blossburg 
VIRGINIA SHULTZ/ Administrator, Broad Acres Nursing Home 

Association 
NICK TELINCHO/Lycoming County Department of Children and Youth 

Journalism 

MAX L. COLEGROVE/Owner/Publisher, Penny Saver, Wellsboro, and 

Advertiser, Mansfield 
ALVIN N. ELMER/National News Editor, Grit, Williamsport 
REBECCA F. GROSS/Editor Emeritus, The Express, Lock Haven 
LINDA L. SPRINGMAN/Public Information Specialist, The 

Williamsport Hospital 
CLIFFORD A. THOMAS/ Editor, Sun-Gazette, Williamsport 
DALE WAGNER/Owner, Phoenix Graphix 

Mathematical Computer Science 

MICHAEL BRADY/ Lock Haven University 
HAROLD FREY/Bloomsburg University 
DR. DAVID HALEY/ Lycoming College 
ROBERT HICKEY/Wellsboro High School 
HAROLD SCHWARTZ/ Mansfield University 
GAIL SHAW/Bucknell University 

NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT 

Agribusiness/Dairy Herd Management 

LARRY CORSON/Soil Conservation Service 

TED DOEBLER/Doeblers of Pennsylvania Hybrids, Inc. 

THOMAS DUM, JR. /Consultant, Holstein Association 

LLOYD EBERSOLE/Assistant Manager, Sire Power, Inc. 

SAMUEL R. FRY/ Farm Operator 

JAMES GOTTSCHALL/ Manager, Agway 

RICHARD GROVE 

PATRICIA HALLOWELL/Farm Operator 

THOMAS B. HARDING, JR. /President, Progressive Agri-Systems, 

Inc. 
DAVID JARRETT/Dairy Farmer 
MARLIN H. McCLELLAN/Regional Director, Pennsylvania Department 

of Agriculture 
WILLIAM MESSERSMITH/Lycoming County Cooperative Extension 

Office 
ROBERT REICH/General Manager, Farm Credit Service 
GEORGE ROBINSON/Owner-Operator, Feed Store 
JOSEPH SICK/Retired Division Director, The Williamsport Area 

Community College 
DR. GLENN STEVENS/ Retired Professor 
DAVID THOMPSON/Manager, Agway 
FRANK WHITE/Farm Operator 
THELMA WHITE/Farm Operator 

DAVID WILLIAMS/Thomas L. Dunlap Farm Equipment 
WILLIAM WILLIAMS/Vice President, Jersey Shore State Bank 
JOHN YORK/York and Associates 



Forest Technology 

RAY AZZATO/ Regional Park Superintendent, Bureau of Parks 
DONALD BENSON/Representative, Cotton Hanlin 
WILLIAM W. BROOKS Ill/Pulpwood Producer 
ROY W. CUMMINGS, JR. /Vice President, Cummings Lumber 

Company 
ROBERT DAVEY/ District Forester, Bureau of Forestry 
JACK M. GILES/Game Management, Pennsylvania Game Commission 
ROBERT HERZ/ Eastern Wood Products 
GORDON HILLER/Field Representative, Department of Environmental 

Resources 
KEITH HORN 

DAVID M. HUNTER, JR. /Georgia Pacific 
LEONARD KUHNS/Kuhns Brothers Lumber Company 
PAUL E. LANDON/Timber Acquisition Manager, Proctor and Gamble 

Paper Products 
PATRICK M. LANTZ/ Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry 
DWIGHT LEWIS/ Lewis Lumber Company, Inc. 
MELVIN LEWIS/ Lewis Lumber Company, Inc. 
PHILLIP McCARTHY/Manager, Wood Procurement, Proctor and 

Gamble Paper Products 
WILLIAM McFARLAND/Keystone Central Counselor, Lock Haven 

High School 
FRANCIS MITSTIFER/Mitstifer Brothers Sawmill 
BROOKS REESE/Vice President, Reese Lumber Company 
GARY STACKHOUSE/Williamsport Area High School 
A. E. STAMER/Wood Procurement, Masonite Corporation 
PAUL SWARTZ/ Director, Bureau of Soil and Water Conservation, 

Department of Environmental Resources 
EDWARD SWISHER/Wood Procurement Manager, Hammermill Paper 

Company 
MICHAEL THOMPSON/Hughesville Senior High School 
R. R. THORPE/ Director, Bureau of Forestry 
RAY WHEELAND/Wheeland Sawmill 
MICHAEL YEAGLE/Timber Harvesting 
BRUCE ZINCK/Vice President/ General Manager, Reese Lumber 

Company 

Horticulture 

MARLIN E. ARBEGAST/Phyl Mar Associates 

SCOTT BAYLOR/Country Cupboard, Inc. Garden Center 

DENNIS BURD/Owner, Country Market Landscape Garden Center 

DIANA CIZEK/Country Market & Landscape Garden Center 

NEIL DUNKLE/D.A.D.'s Lawn &• Garden Center 

ROBERT ESHLEMAN, JR. /Owner, Eshleman's Nursery 

GARY FEEREE/White Deer Golf Course 

CHRISTINE FINK 

HELEN FRENCH/Enchanted Florist 

EDMUND GOLOMB, JR. /Owner-Manager, Andres Florist 

ROSEMARY HOLMES/Nevill's Flowers 

WILLIAM HOLMES/Nevill's Flowers 

BRIAN KALUZNY/White Deer Golf Course 

FRANCIS LEHMAN/Crown American Corporation 

DANIEL LICHTENWALNER/ Daniel's Landscaping 

KATY Z. MILLER/Sales Manager, Plant Kingdom, Division of J. L. 

Dillon, Inc. 
DAN MITCHELL/Little Kanawha Nursery 
MARILYN L. MURPHY/Owner, House of Flowers 
BARRY L. PLOWMAN/ Shiloh Nurseries, Inc. 
BILL C. SLATER/ Binghamton Slater Company, Inc. 
MIKE STEBBINS/Shiloh Nurseries, Inc. 
CATHY VOGEL 
ARNOLD B. WAGNER/ Executive Secretary, Pennsylvania Flower 

Growers 
ALLEN R. WALTER/ Owner-Operator, Whispering Pines Greenhouse 
WALLY WENTZ/Owner, Wally Wentz Florist 



•Graduate of The Williamsport Area Community College 



© 



Outdoor Power Equipment 

KEN BERGREN/Ken Bergren, Inc. 

JOHN BUTTORFF/Buttorffs Hardware 

KEITH BUTTORFF/Buttorffs Hardware 

ALLAN DUNKLEBERGER/ Hunter and Lomison, Inc. 

ROBERT FOLMAR/Folmar's Mower Service 

CHARLES GOTTSCHALL/G and R Garage 

RICHARD GROVE/Clark's Farm Supply 

JAMES KELLEY/Hunter and Lomison, Inc. 

BOB LOGUE/Bob Logue's Motorcycle Sports 

RICHARD ROBERTS/ Representative, Philadelphia Toro Company 

CRAIG SWEITZER/Outdoor Hobby Center 

DAN THOMPSON/Thompson's Garage 

CARL WALIZER/Dotterer and Kolesar Equipment, Inc. 

WILLIAM YODOCH/Country Cycle Shop 

Service and Operation of Heavy Construction Equipment 

WAYNE ALEXANDER/Manager, Lycoming County Solid Waste 

Department 
LEO ASHCRAFT/Personnel Training Manager, Highway Equipment 

Company 
WILLIAM BASHISTA/President, Straight Line Construction Company, 

Inc. 
JOHN BRAUN/ Lycoming Silica Sand Company 
T. J. CROTTY/ President, Susquehanna Supply Company 
JERRY D. DAVIS/Sales Representative, Stewart-Amos Equipment 

Company 
ROBERT DIETZ/ Personnel Director, L. B. Smith, Inc. 
RUSSELL FAIRCHILD/Fairchild Brothers 
BRIAN HANSEN/S. C. Hansen, Inc. 
BOB HOFFMAN/Sales Representative, Ingersoll-Rand Equipment 

Corporation 
RICHARD HOOSE/Service Manager, Cleveland Brothers, Inc. 
J. MICHAEL MURPHY/Cleveland Brothers, Inc. 
ERIC PARKER 

JAMES ROCKEY/ Retired, Bureau of Forestry 
SHANNON K. ROSSERVFairchild Brothers 
MARK SMITH/Cleveland Brothers, Inc. 
WILLIAM E. WAGNER/Construction Service Engineer, P.E., 

Pennsylvania Department of Transportation 
ALDEN WALSH/G. H. and F. C. Wagaman 

ROBERT WEBB/Sales Representative, Highway Equipment Company 
A. ALLEN WOLESLAGLE/Manager, Forklifts, Inc. 
FRANK WOLYNIEC, JR. /Manager, Allenwood Equipment 
JAMES WOLYNIEC/Vice President, Frank Wolyniec and Sons 

Construction 

Wood Products Technology 

DONALD BENSON/Cotton Hanlin 

MAX BINGAMAN/President, Bingaman and Sons 

HARRY BRESSLER/ Division Manager, Burke-Parson-Bowlby 

Corporation 
RON CALIFORNIA/Mann and Parker Lumber Company 
ROY W. CUMMINGS, JR. /Vice President, Cummings Lumber 

Company 
WILLIAM DEAN/ Vice President, Donald Dean and Sons 
JOHN R. DREVCO/Drevco Products, Inc. 
RONALD GALE/Wood Utilization Advisor, Department of 

Environmental Resources, Bureau of Forestry 
ROBERT HERZ/Eastern Wood Products 
DAVID HUNTER, JR. /Georgia Pacific 

FRANCIS X. KENNEDY/ District Forester, Bureau of Forestry 
DALE KEPNER/ Plant Manager, Rishel Furniture Company 
LEONARD KUHNS/Kuhns Brothers Lumber Company 
MARC LEWIS/ Lewis Lumber Company 
MELVIN LEWIS/ Lewis Lumber Company 
JOHN MALLERY/Mallery Lumber Company 
JAY McCALL/ Plant Manager, McCallco 
BROOKS REESE/Reese Lumber Company 
GERALD SCHANBACHER/Owner, Mansfield Novelty Company 
A. E. STAMER/Wood Procurement, Masonite Corporation 
BRUCE ZINCK/Reese Lumber Company 



® 



TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY 

Auto Body 

RON BUDMAN/Owner, Budman's 

DARYL FISHER/Claims Adjuster, Prudential Property and Casualty 

Insurance Company 
MARK MOFFETT/ Mark's Body and Frame Shop 
JOSEPH J. ORELLI/Orelli Supply Company 
DANIEL PLANKENHORN/Owner-Operator, Allied Auto 
EDWON STROBLE, JR. /Owner-Operator, Stroble's Garage 
BILL STUGART/ Blaise Alexander Chevrolet 
STEVEN WHIPPLE/ Owner-Operator, Whipple's Auto Body 

Automotive Mechanics/Automotive Technology 

CECIL CALVERT/Shop Foreman, Bill Fry Ford 

TOM COHICK/Service Manager, Van Campen Motors 

GERALD ESHBACH/Service Manager, Larry Herron, Inc. 

GARRY L. FOLTZ/Service Manager, Carnes Ford 

VIRGIL FOWLER/Owner, Fowler Motors 

DONALD KING/Owner/Operator, K and W Transmissions 

GLENN KLINE 

THOMAS KOONTZ/ Mechanic, Van Campen Motors 

DAVID SHIRN/Owner, Shirns-Pontiac GMC 

LARRY STROUSE/Reighard's 

Aviation Maintenance Technician/Aviation Technology 

ROBERT BARRETT/Foreman, Avco Service Center, Lycoming Division 
KARL CRIST/Mechanic, Avco Service Center, Lycoming Division 
RICHARD FREEBURN/Chief Maintenance Inspector, Federal Aviation 

Administration 
ROBERT GIFT/Co-Owner, Lock Haven Airmotive Company 
WILLIAM LEUTHOLD/Technical Writer 
WILLIAM YAGGI/Service Technician, Cessna Aircraft 

Diesel Mechanics 

REX FORNATARO/Advanced Diesel Specialist, Inc. 

JOHN GINGRICH/Branch Manager, Penske Detroit Diesel Allison 

STANLEY KABATA/Shop Foreman, Pennsylvania Power and Light 

Company 
C. D. KELLER/Co-Owner/Operator, Keller and Schell 
JOHN KELLY/Owner/Operator, Hunter and Lomison, Inc. 
WILLIAM C. MOORE/Maintenance Manager, Carolina Freight 
ROBERT RUSSELL/Owner, Russell's Road Service 
GENE STAVITZSKI/Wilkes Barre Mack Distributors 
JIM TANNER/Shop Foreman, Day Equipment Company 
WILLIAM THOMKE/General Manager, Nau and Thompson 
B. A. WALKER/Vice President, Maintenance, Halls Motor Transit 



•Graduate of The Williamsport Area Community College 



STAFF 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

ROBERT L. BREUDER/President; B.A., M.S., 
State University of New York at Albany; 
Ph.D., The Florida State University 

ROBERT G. BOWERS/ Executive Assistant for 
Internal Affairs (Professor); B.S., Juniata 
College; M.S., University of Delaware; 
Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University 

JEANNETTE FRASER/Dean of Educational 
Research, Planning and Evaluation; B.A., 
M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

FREDERICK T. GILMOUR Ill/Executive 
Director, The Williamsport Area Community 
College Foundation; A. A., The Williamsport 
Area Community College; B.S., Mansfield 
University 

NORA M. MARTZ/ Administrative Assistant to 
the President 

INTERNATIONAL FACULTY 

DR. PAUL CHAO/ Professor of International 

Relations (Orient) 
DR. WERNER KUBSCH/ Professor of 

International Relations (Europe) 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

JAMES E. MIDDLETON/Dean of Academic 
Affairs; B.A., M.A., Ed.S., University of 
Iowa; M.A., University of Leeds, England; 
D.A., University of Michigan 

GEORGE P. WOLFE/ Director of Academic 
Computing; B.S., Lycoming College; M.S., 
Clarkson College of Technology 

Divisions and Programs 

JOHN F. THOMPSON/Associate Academic 
Dean; B.S., Delaware Valley College; M.S., 
University of Scranton 

GEORGE L. BAKER/ Director of Industrial 
Technology Division; B.S., California State 
College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State 
University; Ed.D., University of Northern 
Colorado 

SUZANN L. BENNETT/Coordinator of Food 
Service; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

DONALD B. BERGERSTOCK/Director of 
Business and Computer Technologies 
Division (Professor); B.S., Bloomsburg State 
College; M.S., Bucknell University; D.Ed., 
The Pennsylvania State University 

WILLIAM C. BRADSHAW/ Director of 
Experiential Learning (Assistant Professor); 
B.S., M.S., Mansfield State College 

JAMES A. BRYAN/ Counselor, Act 101 and 
Developmental Studies (Associate 
Professor); B.S., Lycoming College; M.S., 
Bucknell University 

GARY G. CLARK/Weekend Coordinator for 
Computer Science Laboratory; B.S., Lock 
Haven University 

WILLIAM H. DEBOLT/ Director of 
Transportation Technology Division; B.S., 
California State College; M.Ed., 
Shippensburg State College 

FRED W. DOCHTER/Construction 
Coordinator, Professional Development 
Center; Assistant Professor, Carpentry; 
A. A., The Williamsport Area Community 
College 

DANIEL J. DOYLE/ Director of Integrated 
Studies Division (Professor); A.B., Maryknoll 
Seminary, M.A., Ph.D., St. John's 
University 



LINDA FALCHEK-CLARK/Coordinator of 
Practical Nursing; B.S., Neumann College 

R. DEAN FOSTER/ Director of Developmental 
Studies/Act 101; B.A., M.Ed., Lehigh 
University 

VALERIE J. HAYDOCK/Coordinator of 
Individualized Learning Center for 
Typewriting and Word Processing; B.S., 
M.Ed., Bloomsburg State College 

RALPH A. HORNE/Director of Construction 
Technology Division; B.S., M.S., University 
of Tennessee; Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute and State University 

DIANA L. KUHNS/Coordinator of Tutoring 
(Assistant Professor); B.A., The 
Pennsylvania State University 

THOMAS LEITZEL/Assistant Director of 
Business and Computer Technologies 
Division; A. A., The Williamsport Area 
Community College; B.A., Lycoming 
College; M.S., Temple University 

WAYNE R. LONGBRAKE/Director of Natural 
Resources Management Division; B.S., 
M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

RONNA S. McMURTRIE/Act 101 Instructional 
Specialist/ Assistant Director; B.S., M.Ed., 
Bloomsburg University 

DAVIE JANE NESTARICK/ Director of Health 
Sciences Division/ Coordinator of Dental 
Hygiene; A.S., B.S., West Liberty State 
College; M.S., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

ELAINE PARKER/Coordinator of Computer 
Science Laboratory; A.A.S., The 
Williamsport Area Community College 

DANIEL ROSENCRANCE/Evening School 
Coordinator of Computer Science 
Laboratory; B.A., Wilkes College 

ROBERT J. SLOTHUS/ Coordinator of 
Radiography Program (Assistant Professor); 
B.S., Thomas Jefferson University; M.S., 
The Pennsylvania State University 

MICHAEL J. STANZIONE/Administrative 
Assistant, Secondary Vocational Programs; 
B.S., Lock Haven State College 

PATRICIA L. WATSON/Coordinator of 
Radiography Clinic Laboratory; B.S., Salem 
College 

ROBERT W. WOLFE/Assistant Director of 
Integrated Studies Division; B.S., Juniata 
College; M.A., Ph.D., State University of 
New York at Buffalo 

Educational Advancement 

JAMES P. RICE/ Associate Dean of 
Educational Advancement; B.A., M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Texas 

MARILYN BODNAR/Cataloger/Reference 
Librarian; A.A.S., State University of New 
York, Alfred Agricultural and Technical 
School; B.A., Loyola College; M.L.I.S., 
Drexel University 

BARBARA A. DANKO/Director of Lifelong 
Education; B.S., Mansfield State College; 
M.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

ANN E. GIBSON/ Learning Resources Center 
Technical Assistant 

KATE D. HICKEY/ Director, Learning 
Resources Center; B.A., Swarthmore 
College; M.S.L.S., Clarion University 

CAROL F. KAUFMAN/Coordinator of 
Community and Personal Development 
Programs; B.A., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

GRANT L. MARTIN/Coordinator of Service 
Agency and Certification Programs; B.S., 
Bloomsburg State College 

STEVEN McDONALD/ Media Technician; 
A.A.S., State University of New York, 
Alfred Agricultural and Technical School 



SANDRA L. ROSENBERGER/Coordinator of 
Center for Business and Industrial 
Advancement; B.A., Washington and 
Jefferson College; M.P.A., The Pennsylvania 
State University 

ANDREW E. SPULER/ Librarian (Associate 
Professor); B.S., Lycoming College; M.Ed., 
The Pennsylvania State University; M.L.S., 
University of Pittsburgh 

A. NEALE WINNER/Coordinator of 
Instructional Media 

ADMINISTRATION 

WILLIAM C. ALLEN/Dean of Administration; 
B.S., The Pennsylvania State University 

JILL A. NOON/Administrative Assistant to the 
Dean of Administration; A.S., County 
College of Morris; A.A.S., The Williamsport 
Area Community College 

Business Operations 

DAVID A. HOYES/ Director of Business 
Operations; B.S., University of Maryland, 
European Division 

ELEONORE R. HOLCOMB/Bookstore 
Supervisor; Diploma, National Association of 
College Stores 

HARRY P. TUPPER/ Manager of Warehouse 

RUSSELL W. UMSTEAD/Supervisor of 
Purchasing 

JOHN VITALI/Manager of Food Services 
Operation; A.S., Lackawanna Junior College 

Computer Operations 

CARL CHRISTIANSEN/Director of Computer 

Services 
PATRICIA M. BALDWIN/ Manager, Word 

Processing Center; A.A.S., The Wlliamsport 

Area Community College 

MICHAEL M. CUNNINGHAM/Senior 
Programmer/ Analyst; A.A.S., The 
Wlliamsport Area Community College 

SARAJANE HAMMOND/Programmer/ 
Analyst; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

H. DAVID KEPNER/Operations Manager; 

A.A.S., The Williamsport Area Community 

College 
WILLIAM T. WARD/lnformation Center 

Software/ Device Specialist; B.Ed., 

Wsconsin State University, Whitewater; 

M.S. A., The George Washington University 

ANNE E. WEILMINSTER/ Information Center 
Support Analyst; A.A.S. (2), The 
Williamsport Area Community College 

CHARLES H. WHITFORD/Chief 
Operator/ Maintenance Programmer; 
Certificate, Williamsport Technical Institute 

Financial Operations 

CHARLES A. DUDA/Accountant; A.A.S. , The 
Williamsport Area Community College; B.A., 
Lycoming College 

JAMES C. McMAHON/Assistant Controller; 
B.A., Lycoming College 

ERIC D. RANCK/Staff Accountant; B.S., 
Bloomsburg State College 

ANDREA SKROBACS/ Bursar 

Student Records 

KATHRYN M. MARCELLO/Registrar/Director 
of Institutional Research; B.A., Lycoming 
College 

CONNIE R. KELSEY/Assistant Registrar; A. A., 
The Williamsport Area Community College 



139 



DEVELOPMENT 

GRANT M. BERRY, JR. /Dean of 
Development; B.A., Lycoming College; 
M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University; 
Ph.D., The University of Connecticut 

PAUL J. PETCAVAGE/ Coordinator of Grants 
Management and Development; B.A., 
Mansfield State College; M.P.A., The 
Pennsylvania State University 

EMPLOYEE AND COMMUNITY 
RELATIONS 

MILES D. WILLIAMS/ Dean of Employee and 
Community Relations; B.S., M.S., Ph.D., 
Florida State University 

CHARLES A. BITTNER/Assistant Director of 
Personnel Services; B.A., Mansfield State 
College; M.A., Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania 

JUDITH L. DEMKO/Manager of Duplicating 
and Mail Services; Certificate, Williamsport 
Technical Institute 

MARK R. JONES/Graphic Artist/ Designer; 
B.A., M.Ed., Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania 

ELAINE J. LAMBERT/ Communications 
Assistant; A. A. A., The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

LINDA M. MORRIS/ Director of Personnel 
Services/EEO Coordinator; B.A., Good 
Counsel College; M.A., Ohio University 

K. PARK WILLIAMS/Production 

Printer/ Printing Lab Supervisor; A.A.S., The 
Williamsport Area Community College 

GENERAL SERVICES 

DONALD E. PETERSON/ Dean of General 
Services; B.S., University of Nebraska at 
Omaha 

HARRY I. BAILEY/Supervisor of Maintenance 

CECIL C. CRYDER/ Supervisor of Security; 
Diploma, Institute of Applied Science 

ROBERT E. LINN/Supervisor of Custodial 
Services 

JOSEPH G. McNERNEY/Custodial Night Shift 
Foreman; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College; B.A., St. Francis 
College 

JOHN L. YOST/Supervisor of Plumbing, 

Heating and Cooling Systems; A.A.S., State 
University of New York, Alfred Agricultural 
and Technical School 

NORTH CAMPUS 

CATHRYN L. ADDY/Dean of the North 
Campus; B. A., Kansas State University; 
M.A., State University of New York at 
Oswego; Ph.D., University of Texas 

BRENDA G. ABPLANALP/Assistant 
Coordinator of Practical Nursing, North 
Campus; B.S.N., University of Rochester; 
M.S.Ed., Mansfield University 

BEVERLY McGILL/ Coordinator of Displaced 
Homemaker Program, North Campus; 
B.S.W., Virginia Commonwealth University 

LORRAINE L. TREVI NO/ Coordinator of 
AVT/Computer Laboratory, North Campus; 
B.S., Lock Haven State College 

STUDENT SERVICES 

WILLIAM J. MARTIN/Dean of Student 
Services; B.A., Lycoming College; M.A., 
Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University 

Admissions and College Activities 

CHESTER D. SCHUMAN/ Director of 
Admissions and College Activities; A.B., 
Susquehanna University; M.Ed., Memphis 
State University 



DENNIS DUNKLEBERGER/Assistant Director 
of Admissions; B.A., East Stroudsburg State 
College 

JO ANN FREMIOTTI/Coordinator of College 
Activities; B.S., Boston University 

DAVID GOLFIERI/ Evening College Activities 
Assistant; B.S., Lock Haven State College 

MARY SINIBALDI/Admissions Officer; B.S., 
Clarion University; M.S., Central Missouri 
State University 

Advisement and Career Services 

LAWRENCE W. EMERY, JR. /Director of 
Advisement and Career Services; B.A., The 
University of Maine, Orono; M.S., State 
University of New York, Oneonta 

G. ROBERT CONVERSE/ Coordinator of 
Federally Funded Career Development 
Programs; B.A., Lycoming College, U.S. 
Naval Academy; M.S., Rutgers University 

KATHRYN A. FERRENCE/Counselor for 
Special Needs Students; B.A., Lock Haven 
State College; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State 
University 

THOMAS M. McNALLY/ Counselor 
(Professor); B.A., St. Vincent College; 
M.Ed. 12), University of Pittsburgh 

WELDON W. MICHAEL/Career Development 
Specialist; B.S., East Stroudsburg State 
College; M.Ed., Edinboro State College 



THOMAS C. SHOFF/ Counselor; B.S. 
The Pennsylvania State University 



M.Ed. 



® 



Financial Aid and Student Health Services 

DONALD S. SHADE/ Director of Financial Aid; 
A. A., The Williamsport Area Community 
College; B.S., Bloomsburg State College 

JANICE A. KUZIO/Assistant Director of 
Financial Aid; A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

JANET QUERIMET/ Registered Nurse, Student 
Health Services; R.N., The Memorial 
Hospital 

EDNA F. REIFF/Financial Aid Assistant 

FACULTY, COUNSELORS, LIBRARIANS 

JAMES I. ADAMS/ Associate Professor, Tile 
Setting; Certification, The Pennsylvania 
State University 

SCOTT B. APPLEMAN/lnstructor, Service and 
Operation of Heavy Construction Equipment; 
Certificate, The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

ALEXW. BAILEY/ Professor, Business 
Administration; B.S., Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

JANET A. BARBOUR/lnstructor, Health 
Assistant; A.A.S., Illinois Valley Community 
College; B.S., Towson State College 

JACQUELINE BAUGHMAN/lnstructor, 
Practical Nursing; R.N., Reading Hospital; 
B.S., Albright College 

FRANKLIN P. BEATTY Ill/Associate Professor, 
Plumbing and Heating; B.S., Susquehanna 
University; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

DELMONT F. BERGEY/Associate Professor, 
Automotive; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College; Vocational Certificate II, 
The Pennsylvania State University 

MICHAEL A. BIERLY/lnstructor, Computer 
Science; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College; B.S., Bloomsburg 
University 

SETH M. BIERLY/lnstructor, Machine Shop 

MARI LYN BODN AR / Cataloged Reference 
Librarian; A. AS., State University of New 
York, Alfred Agricultural and Technical 
School; B.A., Loyola College; M.L.I.S., 
Drexel University 



NANCY C. BOWERS/lnstructor, Mathematics; 
A.A.S., The Williamsport Area Community 
College; B.A., Lycoming College; M.S., The 
Pennsylvania State University 

CHARLES A. BROOKE/ Assistant Professor, 
Mathematics; A.B., Lycoming College 

DARLA L. BROWN/lnstructor, Dental 
Hygiene; A. AS., The Williamsport Area 
Community College; B.S., Lock Haven 
University 

JOSEPH H. BROWN, SR./ Instructor, 
Automotive; A. A., The Wlliamsport Area 
Community College 

JAMES A. BRYAN/Counselor, Developmental 
Studies and Act 101 (Associate Professor); 
B.S., Lycoming College; M.S., Bucknell 
University 

WILLIAM A. BURGER/lnstructor, Plumbing 
and Heating 

LAMONT E. BUTTERS/Associate Professor, 
Civil Technology; Professional Engineer; 
B.S., The Pennsylvania State University; 
M.S., Purdue University 

ANTHONY N. CILLO/Associate Professor, 
Journalism; B.A., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

DAVID B. CLARK/Associate Professor, 
Chemistry; A.B., Lycoming College; M.S., 
Bucknell University 

NED S. COATES/Associate Professor, English; 
B.A., Susquehanna University; M.A., 
University of Arkansas 

ROBERT CRISSMAN/lnstructor, Building 
Construction 

JEAN M. CUNNINGHAM, R.N. /Instructor, 
Practical Nursing; B.S.N., Columbia 
University 

WILLIAM E. CURRY/ Instructor, Automotive; 
Certificate, Williamsport Technical Institute; 
Trade Comp., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

ELIZABETH DAHLGREN/Assistant Professor, 
Business Administration; B.S., M.Ed., 
Bloomsburg State College 

ROBERT W. DANELLEY/Assistant Professor, 
Electrical Occupations 

ROGER E. DAVIS/Associate Professor, 
Mathematics; B.S., Clarion State College; 
M.S., Bucknell University 

NATALIE 0. DeLEONARDIS/ Instructor, 
Practical Nursing; Geisinger Medical Center 
School of Nursing; B.S., Millersville 
University 

DAVID C. DIETRICK/Assistant Professor, 
Welding; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

FRED W. DOCHTER /Assistant Professor, 
Carpentry; Construction Coordinator, 
Professional Development Center; A. A., The 
Williamsport Area Community College 

JAMES E. DOEBLER/lnstructor, Aviation; 
Certificate, The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

ADELLE M. DOTZEL/ Instructor, Mathematics; 
B.S., Kings College; M.A., The Pennsylvania 
State University 

SAMUEL E. DRIVER/lnstructor, Diesel 
Mechanics 

DR. PETER B. DUMANIS/ Professor, English; 
B.A., Clark University; M.A., Adelphi 
University; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

WILLIAM H. EALER, Assistant Professor, 
Architecture; R.A.; N.C.A.R.B. Registration; 
B.S., B. Arch., Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute 



CARYLL ECK/Associate Professor, Practical 
Nursing; R.N., Williamsport Hospital School 
of Nursing; B.S., Bloomsburg State College 

BENJAMIN H. ELDRED/ Assistant Professor, 
Service and Operation of Heavy Construction 
Equipment; Certificate, The Williamsport 
Area Community College 

JACQUELYNNE D. ELLIS/Associate Professor, 
Practical Nursing; R.N., Harrisburg Polyclinic 
Medical Center; B.P.S., Elizabethtown 
College 

DAN EMICK/lnstructor, Service and Operation 
of Heavy Construction Equipment 

STEVEN A. ERBACH/lnstructor, Wood 
Products Technology; A.A.S., The 
Williamsport Area Community College; B.S., 
University of New Hampshire 

KATHRYN FERRENCE/Counselor for Special 
Needs Students; B.A., Lock Haven State 
College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

LEONARD FILIPKOWSKI/Assistant Professor, 
Automotive; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

DENNIS E. FINK/lnstructor, Horticulture; 
A.A.S., The Williamsport Area Community 
College 

DONALD FLYNN/Associate Professor, 
Automotive; M.Eq. 

ROY FONTAINE/lnstructor, Psychology; B.A., 
Providence College; M.S., Bucknell 
University; Ph.D., University of Georgia 

JAMES W. FOX/ Instructor, Welding 

ALAN D. FRYE/ Instructor, Machine Tool 
Technology; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

JAMES GARLAND/lnstructor, Aviation; 
A.S.T., Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics; 
B.S., Savannah State Teacher's College 

JAMES W. GEORGE/ Assistant Professor, 
Agribusiness; B.S., University of Georgia 

GLEN F. GETCHEN/Assistant Professor, 
Machine Tool Technology 

ROBERT V. GLECKNER/ Instructor, 
Horticulture; B.S., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

PAUL W. GOLDFEDER/Assistant Professor; 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh 

PERRY R. GOTSCHAL/Assistant Professor, 
Electronics; B.S., Bloomsburg State College 

RICHARD B. GREENLY/Assistant Professor, 
Business Administration; B.S., M.S., 
Bloomsburg State College 

ANTHONY M. GURAVAGE/Assistant 
Professor, Electrical Occupations; A. A., The 
Williamsport Area Community College 

ROBERT L. HAFER/ Instructor, Automotive; 
A.A.S., The Williamsport Area Community 
College 

RUTH E. HAMEETMAN/lnstructor, Business 
Administration; B.S., M.Ed., Bloomsburg 
State College 

JOHN HAMMOND/Associate Professor, 
Automotive; B.S., M.Ed., The Pennsylvania 
State University 

ALFRED L. HAUSER/Associate Professor, 
Machine Tool Technology; Certificate, The 
Williamsport Technical Institute; B.P.S., 
Elizabethtown College; M.Eq., The 
Pennsylvania State University 

RUBY K. HAYES/Assistant Professor, 
Business Administration; B.S., Grove City 
College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University 

PAUL L. HEIM/ Associate Professor, 
Carpentry; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College; B.S., The Pennsylvania 
State University 



PHILIP H. HENNING/Assistant Professor, 
Electrical; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College; B.A., The Pennsylvania 
State University; M.A., San Francisco State 
University 

CARL HILLYARD/lnstructor, Carpentry 

WILLIAM A. HOLMES/lnstructor, Machine 
Shop; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College; M.Eq., The 
Pennsylvania State University 

DAVID C. JOHNSON/lnstructor, Electronics; 
B.S.E.T., Moody Bible Institute 

RAE ANN KARICHNER/Assistant Professor, 
Dental Hygiene; Certificate, Temple 
University; B.S., Bloomsburg State College; 
M.S., Marywood College 

LYLEW. KEELER/ Instructor, Electrical 
Occupations 

GLENN F. KLINE/Assistant Professor, 
Automotive; B.S., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

GARY KNEBEL/lnstructor, Computer Science; 
B.A., Columbia College; B.S., Columbia 
School of Engineering; M.S., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 

WILLIAM A. KRANZ/ Instructor, Air 

Conditioning and Refrigeration; A.A.S., The 
Williamsport Area Community College 

MARY ANN R. LAMPMAN/ Instructor, 
Reading; B.S., College Misericordia; M.S., 
Mansfield University 

PHILLIP D. LANDERS/ Associate Professor, 
Business Administration; B.S., Bloomsburg 
State College; M.B.A., Michigan State 
University 

JAMES W. LITTLE/ Assistant Professor, 
Aviation; Vocational Certificate II 

J. THOMAS LIVINGSTONE/Assistant 
Professor, Machine Tool Technology; B.A., 
Manchester College; M.A., Ball State 
University 

JAMES E. LOGUE/ Associate Professor, 
English; B.A., M.A., Bucknell University 

JOHN J. MACKO, JR. /Instructor, Auto Body 
Repair; Certificate, The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

JOSEPH G. MARK/Associate Professor, 
Architectural Drafting; R.A.; B. Arch., The 
Pennsylvania State University 

MARGARET McKEEH EN /Professor, Practical 
Nursing; B.S., Bloomsburg State College; 
M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University 

THOMAS M. McNALLY/Counselor 
(Professor); A.B., St. Vincent College; 
M.Ed. (2), University of Pittsburgh 

REBECCA A. MEISER/lnstructor, 
Mathematics; B.S., Shippensburg State 
College; M.A., Bucknell University 

DALE A. METZKER/Associate Professor, 
Graphic Arts; A. A., The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

VICTOR A. MICHAEL/ Associate Professor, 
Electronics Technology; B.S., Bloomsburg 
State College 

WELDON W. MICHAEL/Career Development 
Specialist; B.S., East Stroudsburg State 
College; M.Ed., Edinboro State College 

ANN R. MIGLIO/ Associate Professor, Food 
Service and Hospitality; B.S., University of 
Wisconsin, Stout Campus 

JOSEPH P. MIGLIO/ Associate Professor, 
Machine Shop; B.S., University of 
Wisconsin, Stout Campus; M.A., University 
of Minnesota 

DONNA R. MILLER/Associate Professor, 
Physical Education; B.S., Lock Haven State 
College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

JOHN MILLER/lnstructor, Computer Science; 
B.S., Lock Haven University 



LYMAN I. Ml LROY/ Associate Professor, 
Mathematics; B.A., Susquehanna University; 
M.S., Bucknell University 

JACK MIRTO/Assistant Professor, Auto Body 

ROBERT S. MIX, JR. /Instructor, Electrical 
Occupations 

DAVID MONTGOMERY/lnstructor, Welding 

VIVIAN MOON/Associate Professor, Food 
Service and Dietetics; R.D.; B.S., M.Ed., 
The Pennsylvania State University 

GLADYS L. MORRIS/lnstructor, English; B.S., 
Lock Haven State College 

JACK D. MURPHY/lnstructor, Mathematics; 
B.S., M.S., Drexel University 

JOSEPH B. MURPHY/Assistant Professor, 
Carpentry; Certificate, A.A.S., The 
Williamsport Area Community College; B.S., 
State University of New York, Oswego 

PATRICK D. MURPHY/Assistant Professor, 
Advertising Art; A.S., Luzerne County 
Community College; B.A., Kings College 

VERONICA M. MUZIC/ Professor, English; 
A.B., College Misericordia; M.A., Bucknell 
University 

MICHAEL P. NESTARICK/Associate 
Professor, Mathematics; B.S., Bloomsburg 
State College; M.S., Bucknell University 

HAROLD L. NEWTON/ Instructor, Graphic Arts 

DONALD NIBERT/Assistant Professor, 
Forestry; B.S., M.S., West Virginia 
University 

RUTH N. NICE/ Instructor, Practical Nursing; 
Diploma, Nesbitt Memorial Hospital; B.S.N., 
Wilkes College- 

ROBERT L. NORTON/lnstructor, Aviation; 
Certificate, Williamsport Technical Institute; 
A.A.S., The Williamsport Area Community 
College 

EARL L. PARRISH/Associate Professor, 
Machine Shop 

JUDITH M. PATSCHKE/lnstructor, Quantity 
Foods; B.S., Mansfield State University 

ROBERT A. PATTON/lnstructor, Dairy Herd 
Management; B.S., M.S., The Pennsylvania 
State University 

ELWOOD PAULING/lnstructor, Machine 
Shop; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

RODMAN H. PERRY/ Instructor, Automotive 

LENORE PENFIELD/lnstructor, Dental 
Hygiene; A.S., Montgomery County 
Community College 

JAMES C. PIVIROTTO/Associate Professor, 
Forest Technology; B.S., The Pennsylvania 
State University 

FRANK L. PORTER/Associate Professor, 
English; B.A., University of Florida; M.A., 
Bucknell University 

JAMES A. POTTER 11/ Instructor, Carpentry 

DONALD 0. PRASTER/Assistant Professor, 
Welding; B.S., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

CHRIS RADKE/ Professor, Drafting; C.E.T., 
A.A.S., The Williamsport Area Community 
College; B.S., State University of New York, 
Oswego; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

FREDERICK J. RANKINEN/Professor, Civil 
Technology; P.L.S.; B.S., Ohio State 
University; M.Eng., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

RICHARD W. RANKINEN/ Associate Professor, 
Forest Technology; B.S., University of Idaho 

DENNIS H. RICE/lnstructor, Small Engine 
Repair 



141 



DENNIS F. RINGLING/Associate Professor, 
Forest Technology; B.S. (2), M.Ed., The 
Pennsylvania State University 

EDWARD L ROADARMEL/ Instructor, 
Drafting; B.S., The Pennsylvania State 
University 

RONALD L. ROCK/ Professor, Accounting; 
B.S., Shippensburg State College; M.Ed., 
The Pennsylvania State University 

WILLIAM G. RUMMINGS/lnstructor, 

Masonry; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 

Community College 
RICHARD SAHN/lnstructor, Sociology, 

Psychology; B.A., Bard College; M.A., 

Duquesne University 

FRED C. SCHAEFER, JR. /Assistant Professor, 

Graphic Arts; A.S., The Williamsport Area 

Community College 
JANE LOREN SCHEFFEY/Assistant Professor, 

Business Administration; B.S., M.Ed., 

Bloomsburg State College 

PAUL S. SCHRINER/Associate Professor, 
Welding; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

CHRISTINE M. SCHWARTZ/ Instructor, 
Practical Nursing; B.A., Mansfield State 
College; B.S.N., The Catholic University of 
America 

FREDERICK SHARAR/Assistant Professor, 
Foreign Languages; A.B., Lycoming College; 
Zeugnis, Baden-Wurttemberg, Universitat 
Heidelberg, Germany 

JAMES B. SHAW, JR. /Assistant Professor, 
Physics; B.S., Lafayette College; M.S., Old 
Dominion University 

PATRICIA J. SHOFF/Associate Professor, 
Business Administration; B.S., M.Ed., 
Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

THOMAS C. SHOFF/Counselor; B.S., M.Ed., 
The Pennsylvania State University 

DOREEN W. SHOPE/ Assistant Professor, 
Business Administration; B.S., M.Ed., 
Bloomsburg State College 

LEROY G. SIMPSON/Assistant Professor, 
Physics; B.S., Lycoming College 

BRUCE M. SMITH/lnstructor, Electronics; 
Certificate, United Electronics Institute; 
A.A.S., The Williamsport Area Community 
College 

ROBERT G. SNAUFFER/lnstructor, Electrical 
Occupations and Technology 

HARRY C. SPECHT/ Assistant Professor, 
Physical Education; B.S., Lock Haven State 
College; M.S., University of Bridgeport 

ELIZABETH M. SPRINGMAN/lnstructor, 
Surgical Technology 

ANDREW E. SPULER/ Librarian (Assistant 
Professor); B.S., Lycoming College; M.Ed., 
The Pennsylvania State University; M.L.S., 
University of Pittsburgh 

LAWRENCE P. STABLER, SR. /Assistant 
Professor, Automotive; Vocational Certificate 
II, The Pennsylvania State University 

WILLIAM L. STEVENS/Assistant Professor, 
Service and Operation of Heavy Construction 
Equipment; B.S., University of Nebraska; 
M.Ed., Colorado State University 

DALE R. STRAUB/ Professor, Drafting 
Technology; A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College; B.S., M.Ed., The 
Pennsylvania State University 

ROBERT W. STULL/ Assistant Professor, 
Electrical Technology; A.A.S., The 
Williamsport Area Community College; 
B.E.T., Rochester Institute of Technology 

RICHARD M. SWEENEY/ Professor, English; 
B.A., Wabash College; M.A., Ph.D., Brown 
University 



SUSAN W. SWEET/ Instructor, Practical 
Nursing; B.S., Mansfield State College 

GEORGE W. TANNER/lnstructor, Diesel 
Mechanics; Certificate, The Williamsport 
Area Community College 

BONNIE RAE TAYLOR/Associate Professor, 
Business Administration; B.S.Ed., M.Ed., 
Bloomsburg State College 

JAMES E. TEMPLE/ Instructor, Construction 
Technology; B.S., California State College; 
M.Ed., Texas A it M University 

MARY E. TEMPLE/lnstructor, Practical 

Nursing; R.N., Williamsport Hospital School 
of Nursing; B.P.S., Elizabethtown College 

DAMON THOMPSON/Professor, English; 
B.F.A., Ohio State University; M.F.A., 
University of Iowa 

H. LARUE THOMPSON/lnstructor, Electrical 
Occupations 

MARGARET A. THOMPSON/Associate 
Professor, Computer Science; B.S., Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., University 
of Pittsburgh 

RONALD THOMPSON/Professor, Biology; 

B.S., Lycoming College; M.S., Kansas State 

College 
RAY F. TYLER/Associate Professor, Business 

Administration; B.S. (2), Susquehanna 

University; M.B.A., Bucknell University 

MICHAEL TYSON /Assistant Professor, 
Mathematics; B.S., Juniata College; M.A., 
University of Illinois 

RITA C. ULRICH/Assistant Professor, Business 
Administration; B.S., M.Ed., Bloomsburg 
State College 

ROBERT S. ULRICH/Associate Professor, 
English; A.B., Lycoming College; M.Ed., 
Bloomsburg State College 

CHALMER VAN HORN/Associate Professor, 

Drafting; CM. Fg.E.; B.S., The 

Pennsylvania State University 
ROBERT M. VAUGHN/ Instructor, Welding; 

Certificate, A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 

Community College 

SUSAN E. WAJDA/lnstructor, Dental 
Hygiene; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College; B.S., Bloomsburg State 
College 

DONALD A. WALTMAN/ Assistant Professor, 
Electronics; B.S., Dickinson College; M.S., 
Franklin and Marshall 

CLEON D. WATTS /Assistant Professor, 
Masonry 

RICHARD J. WEILMINSTER/Associate 
Professor, Horticulture; A.A.S., State 
University of New York at Farmingdale; 
B.S. A., University of Georgia; M.S., The 
Pennsylvania State University 

JACKIE E. WELLIVER/Associate Professor, 
Drafting; A.I.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College; B.S., The Pennsylvania 
State University 

MARY JANE WEST/Associate Professor, 
English and Economics; B.S., M.S., 
Bucknell University 

WILLIAM R. WEYANT/Assistant Professor, 
Electrical; B.S., Indiana Institute of 
Technology; M.Eq., The Pennsylvania Dept. 
of Education 

THOMAS M. WINDER/Assistant Professor, 
Computer Science; B.S., Lycoming College; 
M.S., Elmira College 

HAROLD D. WINNER/lnstructor, Carpentry 
and Building Construction 

LLOYD F. WOODLING/Associate Professor, 
Mathematics; B.S., Lock Haven State 
College; M.A., Bucknell University 



M. KEITH WYNN/Assistant Professor, 
Electrical Occupations; Certificate, A.A.S., 
The Williamsport Area Community College; 
Professional Certificate, Trade Competency 
Certificate, The Pennsylvania State 
University 

CHESTER F. YAUDES/Assistant Professor, 
Automotive; Vocational Certificate II, The 
Pennsylvania State University 

JAMES S. YOUNG/ Instructor, Carpentry 

WILLIAM P. YOUNG/ Instructor, Building 
Construction; A.A.S., The Williamsport Area 
Community College 

PAUL J. ZELL, JR. /Instructor, Service and 
Operation of Heavy Construction Equipment; 
A.A.S., The Williamsport Area Community 
College 

PAUL J. ZELL, SR. /Instructor, Plumbing 

THOMAS A. ZIMMERMAN/lnstructor, Human 
Services/ Social Sciences; B.A., Lycoming 
College; M.A., Bucknell University 



® 



INDEX OF 
COURSES 



Abnormal Psychology (PSY 201) - 110 
Abrasive Machining (MTT 641) - 105 
AC Circuits Applications (ENT 153) - 96 
AC for Electronics (ENT 152) - 96 
Accident Prevention (ELT 1131-95 
Accounting I (ACC 1121-80 
Accounting II (ACC 122) - 80 
Acetylene Welding (WEL 701) - 114 
Acetylene Welding (WEL 712) - 114 
Adapted P. E. /Weight Training (PED 145) - 99 
Advanced Assembly Language (CSC 244) - 90 
Advanced Circuit Analysis (ENT 248) - 96 
Advanced Communication Laboratory 

(ENT 259) - 96 
Advanced Communication Systems 

(ENT 258) - 96 
Advanced Detail I (EDT 241) - 93 
Advanced Detail II (EDT 242) - 93 
Advanced Electrical Construction 

(ELC 845) - 94 
Advanced Electrical Theory (ELT 244) - 95 
Advanced Forest Mensuration (FOR 124) - 101 
Advanced Motor Control (ELC 832) - 94 
Advanced Plumbing Skills (PLH 712) - 109 
Advanced Process Camera & Stripping 

(GCO 642) - 103 
Advanced Quantity Foods (FHD 201) - 101 
Advanced Surveying (CET 245) - 88 
Advanced Systems & Codes (PLH 722) - 110 
Advanced Techniques of Food Production and 

Services (QFP 540) - 111 
Advanced Typographic Composition 

(GCO 641) - 103 
Advertising Design (ART 242) - 81 
Aerobic Dance (PED 169) - 99 
Agricultural Financing (AGB 124) - 81 
Agricultural Sales & Service (AGB 249) - 81 
Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration Electricity 

(ELT 531) -95 
Air Movement & Ventilation (ACR 241) - 81 
Aircraft Assembly and Rigging/ Inspection 

(APC 638) - 84 
Aircraft Atmosphere Control and Ice/ Rain 

Control (APC 645) - 85 
Aircraft Communications, Navigation and 

Instruments (APC 644) - 85 
Aircraft Covering, Finishes and Welding 

(APC 637) - 84 
Aircraft Drawings (EDT 104) - 93 
Aircraft Electrical (APC 636) - 84 
Aircraft Fuel and Fire Protection (APC 646) - 85 
Aircraft Landing Gear, Hydraulics, Pneumatics 

and Position Warning (APC 643) - 84 
Aircraft Servicing/ Fluidliners and Fittings 

(APC 516) - 84 
Aircraft Sheet Metal and Wood Structure 

(APC 642) - 84 
Alternating Current Fundamentals 

(ELC 722) - 94 
Alternating Current Fundamentals 

(ELT 122) - 95 
American Government - National 

(GOV 231) - 102 
Animal Breeding and Reproduction 

(DHM 724) - 91 
Animal Production (AGB 236) - 81 
Applied Calculus (MTH 107) - 106 
Applied Drafting Techniques (EDT 232) - 93 
Applied Human Physiology (BIO 1101-85 



Applied Software Development (CSC 248) - 90 
Archery/Volleyball (PED 141) - 99 
Architectural Drafting (IND 844) - 104 
Architectural Graphics I (ARC 1121-82 
Architectural Graphics II (ARC 122) - 82 
Arithmetic (MTH 001) - 92, 106 
Audio in Media (BRC 1141-85 
Auditing (ACC 246) - 80 
Auto Body Maintenance (ABC 723) - 83 
Automatic Machines (MTT 521) - 105 
Automatic Transmission and Air Conditioning 
Service (AMT641) -83 

Badminton/Volleyball (PED 142) - 99 

Banking it Investments (MGT 237) - 87 

Basic Algebra (MTH 002) - 92, 106 

Basic Anatomy it Physiology (BIO 1211-85 

Basic Architectural Drafting (ARC 102) - 82 

Basic Auto Body (ABC 713) - 82 

Basic Botany (Horticulture) (BIO 111) - 85 

Basic Drafting (IND 714) - 104 

Basic Drafting I (EDT 111) - 93 

Basic Drafting II (EDT 1121-93 

Basic Drawing (ART 1111-80 

Basic Electrical Construction (ELT 125) - 95 

Basic Electrical Construction Lab 

(ELC 833) - 94 
Basic Electricity (APC 513) - 83 
Basic Electronics (ELT 233) - 95 
Basic Electronics For Industry (ELC 834) - 94 
Basic English (ENL 011) - 92, 97 
Basic Motor Control (ELC 7211-94 
Basic Painting (ART 1211-80 
Basic Plumbing (PLH 711) - 109 
Basic Wiring Lab (ELC 712) - 94 
Basic Wiring Lab (ELT 1121-95 
Basketball/Volleyball (PED 124) - 99 
Beginning German I (GER 111) - 102 
Beginning German II (GER 121) - 102 
Beginning Spanish I (SPA 111) - 114 
Beginning Spanish II (SPA 121) - 114 
Beverage Management & Catering 

(FHD 241) - 101 
Biomedical Instrumentation and Instruments 

(ENT 255) - 96 
Blueprint Reading (EDT 107) - 93 
Blueprints, Specifications and Codes 

(BCT 120) - 86 
Bowling/ Physical Fitness (PED 146) - 99 
Broadcast Announcing (BRC 233) - 86 
Broadcast Management Practicum 

(BRC 242) - 86 
Broadcast Writing (BRC 223) - 85 
Building Equipment I (ARC 233) - 82 
Building Equipment II (ARC 242) - 82 
Building Materials I (ARC 1161-82 
Building Materials II (ARC 232) - 82 
Business Communications (MGT 230) - 87 
Business Computer Applications 

(CSC 120) - 89 
Business Law I (MGT 2311-87 
Business Law II (MGT 2411-87 
Business Mathematics (MGT 1111-87 
Business Psychology (MGT 235) - 87 

Calculus I (MTH 238) - 107 

Calculus II (MTH 248) - 107 

Calibration it Standardization (ENT 241) - 96 

Canoeing (PED 170) - 99 

Career Exploration (CHD 101) - 92 

Carpentry for the Trades (BCT 254) - 87 

Chassis Systems Service (AMT 640) - 83 

Chemistry for Graphic Arts (CHM 1091 - 87 

Children's & Young Adult Literature 

(EDU 121) -94 
Civil Drafting (IND 834) - 104 
Civil War History (HIS 203) - 103 
Clerical Office Procedures (CLS 718) - 112 
Clerical Office Workshop (CLS 729) - 112 



Clinical Dental Hygiene I (DHG 124) - 91 
Clinical Dental Hygiene II (DHG 230) - 91 
Clinical Dental Hygiene III (DHG 242) - 91 
Clinical Surgical Technology (SRT 121) - 114 
COBOL Programming I (CSC 128) - 89 
COBOL Programming II (CSC 238) - 90 
College Algebra it Trigonometry I 

(MTH 103) - 106 
College Algebra it Trigonometry II 

(MTH 104) - 106 
College Physics I (PHS 115) - 109 
College Physics II (PHS 125) - 109 
College Reading, Reasoning and Study Skills 

(RDG 111) -92 
Color & Design (ART 2311-80 
Commercial Construction I (BCT 230) - 86 
Commercial Construction II (BCT 240) - 86 
Commercial HVAC Control (ELT 5511-95 
Commercial, Industrial Blueprints and 

Equipment (ELC 835) - 94 
Commercial Refrigeration Systems 

(ACR 5211-81 
Communication Circuits Applications I 

(ENT 163) - 96 
Communication Circuits Applications II 

(ENT 2511 -96 
Communications (ENL 7111-98 
Community Dental Health (DHG 241) - 91 
Computer Operations I (COP 713) - 90 
Computer Operations II (COP 723) - 90 
Computer Operations Internship (COP 724) - 90 
Computer Peripheral Maintenance 

(ENT 256) - 96 
Computer Peripheral Maintenance Laboratory 

(ENT 257) - 96 
Computer Systems with Assembler 

(CSC 230) - 89 
Concrete Construction (BCT 238) - 86 
Construction Estimating and Management 

(BCT 244) - 86 
Construction Materials (BCT 1151-86 
Cooperative Education I (CED 1011-90 
Cooperative Education II (CED 102) - 90 
Cooperative Education III (CED 103) - 90 
Copyreading & Editing (JOU 232) - 105 
Cost Accounting (ACC 2311-80 
Creative Writing (ENL 235) - 98 
Criminology (SOC 242) - 114 

Dairy Feeding and Management 

(DHM 713) -91 
Dairy Herd Health (DHM 714) - 91 
Dairy Production (AGB 125) - 81 
Data Base for Microcomputers (CSC 106) - 89 
Data Structures (CSC 125) - 89 
Data Structures (MCS 201) - 106 
DC for Electronics (ENT 150) - 95 
Dendrology (FOR 1111-101 
Dental Materials (DHG 121) - 91 
Dental Practice Orientation (DHG 244) - 92 
Dental Radiology (DHG 126) - 91 
Dental Specialties (DHG 243) - 91 
Department Operating Techniques 

(SRT 122) - 114 
Descriptive Geometry (EDT 2011-93 
Design Studio I (ARC 236) - 82 
Design Studio II (ARC 246) - 82 
Desserts, Sauces and Meat Preparation 

(QFP 521) - 111 
Detail & Assembly Drawings (EDT 231) - 93 
Developmental Psychology (PSY 203) - 110 
Die Design (TDT 242) - 114 
Diet Therapy With Dietetic Seminar 

(FHD 122) - 100 
Digital Circuits Applications (ENT 164) - 96 
Direct Current Circuits Applications 

(ENT 151) - 95 



Direct Current Fundamentals (ELC 711) - 94 
Direct Current Fundamentals (ELT 1111-94 
Discrete Mathematics (MTH 237) - 107 
Drive Units and Systems (OPE 7111-108 
Dynamics (EIT 203) - 97 

Ecology (BIO 208) - 85 
Economic Analysis (ECO 202) - 93 
Educational Psychology (PSY 231) - 110 
Electric Motors it Refrigeration Controls 

(ELT 541) -95 
Electric Welding (WEL 703) - 114 
Electric Welding (WEL 722) - 114 
Electrical Blueprint Reading & National Electric 

Code (ELT 124) - 95 
Electrical & Electronic Drafting (IND 845) - 104 
Electrical Machinery Analysis (ELC 848) - 94 
Electrical Motor Control (ELT 234) - 95 
Electrical Systems Analysis (ELT 241) - 95 
Electricity For The Trades (ELT 1101-94 
Elementary Statistics I (MTH 201) - 107 
Elementary Statistics II (MTH 202) - 107 
Engine & Electrical Overhaul (AMT 642) - 83 
Engine Components (LDD 612) - 105 
Engine Cooling and Lubricating (APC 633) - 84 
Engine Diagnosis and Service (LDD 621) - 105 
Engine Electrical (APC 635) - 84 
Engine Fire Protection and Instruments 

(APC 634) - 84 
Engine Fuel Systems (APC 524) - 84 
Engine Ignition Systems (APC 522) - 84 
Engine Induction and Exhaust Systems 

(APC 523) - 84 
Engine System Service (AMT 631) - 83 
Engineering Chemistry (EIT 207) - 97 
Engineering Drafting (EDT 102) - 93 
Engineering Drawing (CET 1121-88 
Engineering Economics (EIT 206) - 97 
Engineering Electronics (EIT 210) - 97 
Engineering Physics (EIT 209) - 97 
English Composition I (ENL 1111-97 
English Composition II (ENL 121) - 97 
Environmental Science (ESC 100) - 98 
Equipment & Layouts (FHD 245) - 101 
Equipment & Machinery (FOR 233) - 102 
Equipment & Machinery (WPT 244) - 115 
Ethics & Political Philosophy (PHL 121) - 108 

Farm Management (AGB 248) - 81 
Farm Records, Analysis and Computers 

(DHM 723) - 91 
Fashion Merchandising & Display 

(MKT245) - 112 
Feature Writing (JOU 231) - 105 
Federal Air Regulations, Records, and 

Publications (APC 514) - 83 
Field Er Forage Crop Production (AGB 123) - 81 
Field Experience In Management Systems I 

(FHD 113) - 100 
Field Experience In Management Systems II 

(FHD 123) - 101 
Field Experience In Management Systems IV 

(FHD 231) - 101 
Field Experience In Management Systems V 

(FHD 242) - 101 
Field Work & Advanced Skills (PLH 842) - 110 
File and Database Processing (CSC 240) - 90 
Film Assembly £t Imposition (GCO 522) - 103 
Film Assembly & Imposition (GCO 526) - 103 
Finance (MGT 125) - 87 
Financing Dairy Enterprises (DHM 721) - 91 
Fixture Design (TDT 232) - 114 
Floral Design I (FLR 122) - 100 
Floral Design II (FLR 233) - 100 
Flower Shop Operation (FLR 244) - 100 
Fluid Mechanics (CET 242) - 88 
Fluid Mechanics (EIT 204) - 97 



Football/Volleyball/Basketball (PED 123) - 98 

Forage Production (DHM 712) - 90 

Forest Botany (FOR 115) - 101 

Forest Ecology it Wildlife Management 

(FOR 126) - 101 
Forest Land Management & Recreation 

(FOR 247) - 102 
Forest Mensuration (FOR 113) - 101 
Forest Products (FOR 242) - 102 
Forest Protection (FOR 248) - 102 
Forest Surveying II (FOR 232) - 102 
FORTRAN with Plotting (CSC 239) - 90 
Four-Cycle Diesel Engines (DMC 523) - 92 
Front Office Management it Housekeeping 

(FHD 126) - 101 
Fuel Injection Systems I (DMC 533) - 92 
Fuel Injection Systems II (DMC 534) - 92 
Fuel Systems (LDD 622) - 105 
Fundamentals of Chemistry (CHM 100) - 87 
Fundamentals of Computer Science 

(CSC 1181-89 
Fundamentals of Counseling (HSR 125) - 103 
Fundamentals of Nursing (NUR 101) - 110 
Fundamentals of Speech (ENL 202) - 98 

Gage Design it Programming (TDT 241) - 114 

Gears and Cams (EDT 1031-93 

Gears, Cams, and Mechanisms (IND 724) - 104 

General and Oral Pathology (DHG 239) - 91 

General Anthropology (SOC 112) - 113 

General Aviation Mathematics (MTH 515) - 107 

General Biology I (BIO 1131-85 

General Biology II (BIO 123) - 85 

General Botany (BIO 203) - 85 

General Chemistry I (CHM 1111-88 

General Chemistry II (CHM 1211-88 

General Organic Chemistry (CHM 105) - 87 

General Organic Chemistry (CHM 107) - 87 

General Physics I (PHS 116) - 109 

General Physics II (PHS 126) - 109 

General Psychology (PSY 111) - 110 

Golf (PED 1621-99 

Golf/Bowling (PED 1071 - 98 

Greenhouse Crop Production I (FLR 121) - 100 

Greenhouse Crop Production II (FLR 232) - 100 

Greenhouse Crop Production III (FLR 243) - 100 

Gymnastics (PED 163) - 99 

Health Care Delivery Systems (FHD 234) - 101 
Heat Loss Calculations - Pipe Welding 

(PLH 833) - 110 
Heat Treatment & Cutter Grinding 

(MTT 642) - 105 
Helping Process and Crisis Intervention 

(HSR 121) - 103 
Herbaceous Plants (OHT 116) - 100, 108 
Highway Engineering Technology 

(CET 234) - 88 
Historical Geology (GEL 106) - 102 
Home Remodeling I (BCT 237) - 86 
Home Remodeling II (BCT 248) - 87 
Horticulture Mechanics (OHT 246) - 100, 108 
Horticulture Soils (OHT 114) - 100, 108 
Hospitality, Dietetic Work Experience/ 

Management Systems III (FHD 250) - 101 
Hospitality Management it Theory 

(FHD 236) - 101 
Hospitality Merchandising (FHD 246) - 101 
Hot Water - Heat Conservation (PLH 832) - 110 
House it Conservatory Plants (FLR 245) - 100 
Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

(BIO 115) -85 
Human Anatomy and Physiology II 

(BIO 125) - 85 
Human Service Practicum I (HSR 251) - 104 
Human Service Practicum II (HSR 252) - 104 
Human Service Seminar 

(HSR 260-HSR 279) - 104 



Income Tax Accounting (ACC 125) - 80 
Independent Study (RDG 099) - 92 
Industrial Control (ELC 849) - 94 
Industrial Metrology (MTT 522) - 105 
Inert Gas Welding (WEL 832) - 115 
Installation it Service Problems - 

Air Conditioning (ACR 232) - 81 
Installation & Service Problems - Commercial 

Refrigeration (ACR 522) - 82 
Instructional Swimming (PED 164) - 99 
Insurance (MGT 238) - 87 
Interior Finish Materials (BCT 236) - 86 
Intermediate Accounting I (ACC 232) - 80 
Intermediate Accounting II (ACC 244) - 80 
Intermediate Algebra (MTH 105) - 106 
Intermediate Communication Circuits and 

Systems (ENT250) - 96 
Intermediate Devices Applications 

(ENT 1611-96 
Intermediate Solid State Devices & Circuits 

(ENT 121) -95 
Internal Combustion Engines (DMC 514) - 92 
Internship/Co-op (AGB 240) - 81 
Introduction to Agricultural Business 

(AGB 111) -81 
Introduction to Art (ART 233) - 81 
Introduction to Communication Circuits and 

Systems (ENT 162) - 96 
Introduction to Computers with FORTRAN 

(CSC 103) - 89 
Introduction to Dental Hygiene (DHG 100) - 91 
Introduction to Diesel Mechanics 

(DMC 513) - 92 
Introduction to Digital Electronics 

(ENT 127) - 95 
Introduction to Education (EDU 111) - 94 
Introduction to Food Service (QFP 510) - 110 
Introduction to Food Service Administration it 

Medical Care Organizations (FHD 1141-100 
Introduction to Human Service (HSR 111) - 103 
Introduction to Mass Communication 

(MCM 111) - 106 
Introduction to Mathematics I (MTH 101) - 106 
Introduction to Mathematics II (MTH 102) - 106 
Introduction to Metallurgy (PHS 106) - 109 
Introduction to Microcomputers (CSC 102) - 89 
Introduction to Microprocessors (ENT 249) - 96 
Introduction to Philosophical Analysis 

(PHL 111) - 108 
Introduction to Programmable Logic Control 

(ELT 245) - 95 
Introduction to Radio Station Operation 

(BRC 126) - 85 
Introduction to Refrigeration (ACR 5111-81 
Introduction to Sociology (SOC 111) - 113 
Introduction to Solid State Devices 

(ENT 1161-95 
Introduction to Welding Processes 

(WEL 100) - 114 
Introductory Foods (FHD 1111-100 
Introductory Newspaper Production 

(JOU 122) - 104 
Introductory Physics (PHS 112) - 109 
Introductory Surveying (CET 1131-88 

Jogging/ Physical Fitness (PED 147) - 99 

Landscape Construction (NMG 245) - 108 
Landscape Design (NMG 249) - 108 
Landscape Maintenance (NMG 248) - 108 
Layout & Design (GCO 511) - 102 
Layout it Design (GCO 515) - 102 
Lettering and Layout (ART 232) - 80 
Lifesaving (PED 165) - 99 
Linear Algebra (MTH 249) - 107 
Linear Circuits Applications (ENT 253) - 96 
Linear Integrated Circuits (ENT 252) - 96 
Literature of The American Indian 
(ENL 250) - 98 



144 



Lumber Drying (WPT 123) - 115 
Lumber & Log Grading (WPT 121) - 115 

Machine Drafting (IND 715) - 104 
Machine Language Programming 

(MCS 202) - 106 
Machine Transcription and Office 

Procedures (WDP231) - 115 
Machining I (MTT 511) - 105 
Machining II (MTT 512) - 105 
Management and Administration in 

Human Services (HSR 240) - 104 
Management and Production Techniques 

(QFP 520) - 111 
Managerial Accounting (ACC 230) - 80 
Manufacturing Processes (EDT 108) - 93 
Marketing (MKT 240) - 112 
Marriage & The Family (SOC 231) - 113 
Masonry Construction I (BCT 233) - 86 
Masonry Construction II (BCT 246) - 86 
Mass Media Photography (JOU 114) - 104 
Masters of Horror: Horror in Literature 

and Mass Media (ENL 2511-98 
Material and Processes (APC 515) - 84 
Materials of Construction (CET 111) - 88 
Matrix Algebra (MTH 204) - 107 
Mechanical Drawing (EDT 101) - 93 
Mechanics (PHS 202) • 109 
Mechanisms (EDT 122) - 93 
Media and Law (MCM 122) - 106 
Media and Techniques (ART 241) - 81 
Media Management and Community 

Responsibility (MCM 242) - 106 
Medical Terminology I (MTR 101) - 107 
Medical Terminology II (MTR 102) - 107 
Menu Planning & Cost Control (FHD 125) - 101 
Metal Work (ABC 714) - 83 
Metal Work and Filling (ABC 833) - 83 
Microbiology (BIO 2011-85 
Microcomputer Fundamentals (CSC 104) - 89 
Microprocessor Applications I (ENT 254) - 96 
Microprocessor Applications II (ENT 261) - 97 
Microprocessor Applications III (ENT 263) - 97 
Microprocessor Interfacing (ENT 262) - 97 
Microtranscription (CLS 726) - 112 
Milking Management (DHM 722) - 91 
Modern Physics (PHS 236) - 109 
Motor Maintenance & Repair (ELC 715) - 94 

News Writing (JOU 1111-104 
Newspaper Management & Production 

(JOU 233) - 105 
Nursery Production I (NMG 121) - 107 
Nursery Production II (NMG 232) - 107 
Nursing Care of Adult and Child I 

(NUR 201) - 110 
Nursing Care of Adult and Child II 

(NUR 3011 - 110 
Nutrition (FHD 112) - 100 

Operation, Repair and Maintenance 

(OPE 721) - 108 
Oral Anatomy & Histology (DHG 115) - 91 
Organic Chemistry I (CHM 203) - 88 
Organic Chemistry II (CHM 204) - 88 
Origin, Distribution & Behavior of Soils 

(CET 232) - 88 

Painting (ABC 834) - 83 
Painting and Estimating (ABC 844) - 83 
Panel Alignment (ABC 724) - 83 
Periodontics I (DHG 123) - 91 
Periodontics II (DHG 236) - 91 
Personal and Community Health 

(PED 201) -99 
Personnel Management, Work Simplification 

(FHD 235) - 101 
Pharmacology (DHG 245) - 92 



Philosophy, Sports, Games, Physical Exertion 

(PHL 250I - 108 
Photogrammetry (CET 244) - 88 
Photogrammetry and Forest Surveying I 

(FOR 121) - 101 
Physical Geography (GEO 101) - 102 
Physical Geology (GEL 105) - 102 
Physics - Electricity and Magnetism 

(PHS 102) - 109 
Physics - Heat and Light (PHS 101) - 109 
Physics - Mechanics (PHS 100) - 109 
Physics - Survey (PHS 500) - 109 
Plane Surveying (CET 121) - 88 
Plant Insects and Diseases 

(OHT 239) - 100, 108 
Plant Propagation (OHT 234) - 100, 108 
Platemaking, Substrates and Finishing 

(GCO 631) - 103 
Plumbing for the Trades (PLH 254) - 109 
Plumbing Systems and Blueprints 

(PLH 721) - 109 
Power Train and Accessory Service 

(AMT 630) - 83 
Power Transmission (EDT 121) - 93 
Practical Construction Experience 

(BCT 254) -86 
Press Operations (GCO 632) - 103 
Principles of Advertising (ADV 101) - 80 
Principles of Business (MGT 110) - 87 
Principles of Chassis Systems (AMT 520) - 83 
Principles of Economics (ECO 201) - 93 
Principles of Engine Systems I (AMT 510) - 83 
Principles of Engine Systems II (AMT 511) - 83 
Principles of Power Train and Accessories 

(AMT 521) -83 
Principles of Surgical Technology I 

(SRT 110)- 114 
Principles of Surgical Technology II 

(SRT 120) - 114 
Printing Estimating Practices (GCO 635) - 103 
Printing Processes (GCO 645) - 103 
Process Camera (GCO 521) - 103 
Process Camera (GCO 525) - 103 
Production Management (WPT 243) - 105 
Professional Administration and Contract 

Documents (ARC 244) - 82 
Professional Internship (SEC 242) - 113 
Programmable Control (ELC 847) - 94 
Programming in BASIC (CSC 232) - 89 
Programming in Pascal (CSC 1121-89 
Programming in RPG (CSC 2311-89 
Propellers (APC 525) - 84 
Public Relations (MCM 243) - 106 
Publication Management (JOU 244) - 105 
Purchasing, Storage and Sanitation 

(FHD 115) - 100 

Quality Control (WPT 233) - 115 

Quantity Food Preparation (FHD 121) - 100 

Racquetball (PED 166) - 99 

Radiation Physics (PHS 122) - 109 

Radio Station Operation and Management 

(BRC236) -86 
Radiologic Technology I (RAD 110) - 111 
Radiologic Technology II (RAD 120) - 111 
Radiologic Technology III (RAD 230) - 111 
Radiologic Technology IV (RAD 240) - 111 
Reading Improvement (RDG 010) - 92 
Real Estate Appraisal (RES 1141-111 
Real Estate Financing (RES 116) - 111 
Real Estate Fundamentals (RES 112) - 111 
Real Estate Law (RES 113) - 111 
Real Estate Management (RES 1171-111 
Real Estate Math (RES 119) - 112 
Real Estate Practice (RES 115) - 111 
Real Estate Principles (RES 212) - 112 
Real Estate Taxes (RES 120) - 112 



Reciprocating Engines and Engine Inspection 

(APC 526) - 84 
Red Cross First Aid (PED 202) - 99 
Replacement Stock Management 

(DHM 725) - 91 
Reporting Public Affairs (JOU 121) - 104 
Residential Blueprints (ELC 726) - 94 
Retail Management (MKT 247) - 112 
Retail Principles (MKT 233) - 112 
Roller Skating (PED 167) - 99 
Route Surveying (CET 2311-88 

Salads, Soups, and Sandwich Preparation 

(QFP 511) - 111 
Sales (MKT 243) - 112 
Sawmilling I (WPT 1221-115 
Sawmilling II (WPT 232) - 115 
Secretarial and Administrative Procedures 

(SEC 125) - 113 
Secretarial Microtranscription (SEC 246) - 113 
Secretarial Office Simulation (SEC 247) - 113 
Seminar in Architectural History (ARC 237) - 82 
Service Er Operation I (SOE 713) - 113 
Service & Operation II (SOE 714) - 113 
Service & Operation III (SOE 725) - 113 
Service Et Operation IV (SOE 726) - 113 
Service & Operation V (SOE 837) - 113 
Service & Operation VI (SOE 838) - 113 
Service & Operation VII (SOE 847) - 113 
Service & Operation VIII (SOE 848) - 113 
Sheet Metal & Piping (IND 725) - 104 
Shop and Engine Principles (LDD 611) - 105 
Shop Operation and Customer Relations 

(OPE 722) - 108 
Short Order Preparation (QFP 541) - 111 
Shorthand I (SEC 114) - 112 
Shorthand II (SEC 124) - 112 
Silviculture (FOR 236) - 102 
Site Preparation and Layout (BCT 1101-86 
Small Business Management (MGT 247) - 87 
Small Engine Fundamentals (OPE 710) - 108 
Soccer/Volleyball/Basketball (PED 1211-98 
Social Psychology (PSY 241) - 110 
Softball/ Volleyball/ Basketball (PED 122) - 98 
Software for Microprocesors (ENT 260) - 97 
Soils & Soil Fertility (DHM 7111-90 
Soils, Fertilizer and Agricultural Chemicals 

(AGB 112) -81 
Solar Heat/ Energy Conservation 

(ACR 242) - 81 
Solid State Devices Applications 

(ENT 154) - 96 
Special Studies in Biology (BIO 290) - 85 
Special Studies in Economics (ECO 290) - 93 
Special Studies in English (ENL 290) - 98 
Special Studies in Geology (GEL 2901 - 102 
Special Studies in Government 

(GOV 290) - 102 
Special Studies in History (HIS 290) - 103 
Special Studies in Psychology (PSY 290) - 110 
Special Studies in Sociology (SOC 290) - 114 
Special Topics in Agribusiness (AGB 237) - 81 
Special Topics in Chemistry (CHM 2901 - 88 
Special Topics in Mathematics (MTH 2901 - 107 
Specialized Terminology and Transcription 

(SEC 236) - 113 
Spreadsheet for Microcomputers 

(CSC 107) - 89 
Starches and Entree Production 

(QFP 531) - 111 
State Er Local Government (GOV 241) - 102 
Statics (ARC 111) - 82 
Statics (CET 233) - 88 
Statics (EIT201I - 97 
Statistics with Computer Methods 

(MTH 203) - 107 
Steam Heat & Pipefitting (PLH 841) - 110 



145 



Strength of Materials (CET 243) - 88 
Strength of Materials I (EIT 202) - 97 
Strength of Materials II (EIT 205) - 97 
Structural Drafting (IND 835) - 104 
Structures - Concrete (ARC 247) - 82 
Structures - Steel (ARC 238) - 82 
Structures - Wood (ARC 1211-82 
Summer Internship (RAD 201/202) - 111 
Supervision & Human Relations 

IMGT 248) - 87 
Systems Analysis & Design Methods 

(CSC 235) - 89 

Technical Mathematics I (MTH 710) - 107 
Technical Mathematics II (MTH 500) - 107 
Technical Writing (ENL 2011-98 
Techniques of Food Production 

(QFP530) - 111 
Tennis/ Bowling (PED 106) - 98 
Theory and Operation of Air Conditioning & 

Heating Systems (ACR 231) - 81 
Theory of Programming I (MCS 111) - 106 
Theory of Programming II (MCS 121) - 106 
Thermodynamics (EIT 208) - 97 
Timber Harvesting (FOR 234) - 102 
Tool Drafting (TDT231) - 114 
Tooling Technology I (MTT 631) - 105 
Tooling Technology II (MTT 632) - 105 
Tools, Equipment and Collision Repairs 

(ABC 843) - 83 
Topographic Drawing and Cartography 

(CET 122) - 88 
Truck Tractor Chassis (DMC 544) - 93 
Truck Tractor Power Train (DMC 543) - 92 
Turbine Engines (APC 518) - 84 
Two-Cycle Diesel Engines (DMC 524) - 92 
Typewriting (SEC 509) - 113 
Typewriting I (SEC 111) - 112 
Typewriting II (SEC 121) - 112 
Typewriting III (SEC 231) - 113 
Typographic Composition (GCO 512) - 102 
Typographic Composition (GCO 516) - 103 

United States Survey I (HIS 231) - 103 
United States Survey II (HIS 241) - 103 
Urban Sociology (SOC 241) - 113 

Value Clarification &■ Decision Making 
(CHD 100) - 92 

Weight and Balance/Physics (APC 517) - 84 
Weight Training/Golf (PED 144) - 99 
Weight Training/Volleyball (PED 143) - 99 
Weight Training/ Volleyball/Softball 

(PED 125) - 99 
Welding (Advanced) (WEL 842) - 115 
Western Civilization I (HIS 111) - 103 
Western Civilization II (HIS 121) - 103 
Wheel Alignment and Advanced Chassis 

Service (AMT 643) - 83 
Women In Literature (ENL 252) - 98 
Wood Construction I (BCT 1141-86 
Wood Construction II (BCT 125) - 86 
Wood Construction III (BCT 235) - 86 
Wood Construction IV (BCT 247) - 86 
Wood Industry Co-op/ Internship 

(WPT231) - 115 
Wood Properties & Utilization (WPT 111) - 115 
Woody Plants I (OHT 115) - 100, 108 
Woody Plants II (NMG 126) - 107 
Woody Plants III (NMG 237) - 108 
Word Processing for Microcomputers 

(CSC 105) - 89 
Word Processing I (WDP 121) - 115 
Word Processing II (WDP 232) - 115 
Word Processing III (WDP 2411-115 



146 



Word Processing Internship (WDP 242) - 115 
Working Drawings - Commercial 

(ARC 125) - 82 
Working Drawings - Residential (ARC 1151-82 
World Literature (ENL 2311-98 

Yoga (PED 168) - 99 



INDEX 



Academic Advisors - 116 

Academic Information - 119 

Academic Overload - 119 

Academic Probation - 128 

Academic Progress For Students Receiving 

Financial Aid - 12 
Acceptance and Admission Preference - 4 
Accounting Courses (ACC) - 82 
Accounting Program (BA) - 18 
Act 101 (COPing) - 129 
Admission - 3 

Admission of International Students - 5 
Admission Policy - 3 

Admission Preference, Acceptance and - 4 
Admission Procedure - 4 
Adding a Course - 120 
Advanced Placement Credit - 122 
Advertising Art Courses (ART) - 80 
Advertising Art Program (AR) - 19 
Advertising Courses (ADV) - 80 
Advisement and Career Services Center - 116 
Advisors - 116 
Advisory Committees - 134 
Agribusiness Courses (AGB) - 81 
Agribusiness Program (AG) - 20 
Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration Courses 

(ACR) - 81 
Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration Program 

(RA) - 21 
Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration Program 

(RC) -22 
Application and Application Fee - 4 
Application Fee - 4, 9 

Architectural Technology Courses (ARC) - 82 
Architectural Technology Program (AT) - 23 
Army Reserve Officers Training Corps 

(ROTO - 117 
Associate Degrees - 13 
Associate of Applied Arts (AAA) - 14 
Associate of Applied Science (AAS) - 14 
Associate of Arts (AA) - 15 
Athletics - 117 
Attendance Policy - 128 
Auditing a Course - 120 
Auto Body Repair Courses (ABC) - 82 
Auto Body Repair Program (AB) - 24 
Automotive Mechanics Courses (AMT) - 83 
Automotive Mechanics Program (AM) - 25 
Automotive Technology Courses (AMT) - 83 
Automotive Technology Program (AU) - 26 
Aviation Center - 8 
Aviation Courses (APC) - 83 
Aviation Maintenance Technician Program 

(AC) - 27 
Aviation Technology Program (AD) - 28 

Biology Courses (BIO) - 85 
Board of Trustees - 2 
Books and Supplies - 10 
Broadcasting Courses (BRC) - 85 
Broadcasting Program (BR) - 29 
Building Construction Technology Courses 
(BCT) - 86 



Building Construction Technology Program 

(CB) -30 
Business Administration Emphasis - 74 
Business and Computer Technologies Division 

(program list) - 16 
Business Management Courses (MGT) - 87 
Business Management Program (BM) - 31 

Calendar - 148 

Campus and Facilities - 8 

Campus Life - 117 

Career Services, Advisement and - 116 

Carpentry Courses (BCT) - 86 

Center for Business and Industrial 

Advancement - 130 
Center for Lifelong Education - 130 
Center for Lifelong Education 

(program list) - 17 
Certificate in Special Field of Study - 15 
Change of Course - 120 
Change of Program - 6, 120 
Chemistry Courses (CHM) - 87 
Civil Engineering Technology Courses 

(CET) - 88 
Civil Engineering Technology Program 

(CT) - 32 
Classification of Students - 119 
Clerical Studies Courses (CLS) - 112 
Clerical Studies Program (BT) - 33 
Clubs- 117 

College Directory - 139 

College and University Transfer Programs - 73 
College and University Transfer Programs 

(program list) - 17 
College Colors and Nickname - 118 
College Credit Earned Before High School 

Graduation - 7 
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) - 7 
College Opportunity Programming 

(COPing) - 129 
College Termination - 126, 127 
College Transfer - 116 
Commencement Awards - 132 
Communications Emphasis - 75 
Computer Information Systems Courses 

(CSC) - 89 
Computer Information Systems Program 

(CS)-34 
Computer Operator Courses (COP) - 90 
Computer Operator Program (CO) - 33 
Construction Carpentry Courses (BCT) - 86 
Construction Carpentry Program (CO - 35 
Construction Technology Division 

(program list) - 16 
Cooperative Education - 123 
Cooperative Education Courses (CED) - 90 
Cooperative Education (program list) - 17 
COPing - 129 
Counseling - 116 
Course Descriptions - 79 
Credit by Exam - 122 
Credit for Work/ Life Experience - 123 
Credit Load - 119 

Cross Registration (Lycoming) - 124 
Cumulative Grade Point Average - 121 
Curriculum Guides - 74 

Dairy Herd Management Courses (DHM) - 90 
Dairy Herd Management Program (DY) - 36 
Danville State Farm Laboratory - 8 
Dean's Honor List - 126 
Deferred Payment - 9 
Degrees After Dark - 13 
Degrees And Programs - 13 
Dental Hygiene Courses (DHG) - 91 
Dental Hygiene Program (DH) - 37 
Developmental Studies - 129 
Developmental Studies (program list) - 17 



Developmental Studies Courses 

(CHD, ENL, MTH, RDG) - 92 
Diesel Mechanics Courses (DMC) - 92 
Diesel Mechanics Program (DM) - 38 
Diesel Technology Program (DD) - 39 
Dietetic Technician Program (DT) - 40 
Divisions and Programs (listing) - 16 
Drafting - Engineering Courses (EDT) - 93 
Dropping a Course - 120 

Early Admission - 4 

Earth Science Center - 8 

Economics Courses (ECO) - 93 

Education Courses (EDU) - 94 

Education Emphasis • 75 

Electric Courses (ELC & ELT) - 94 

Electrical Occupations Courses (ELC) - 94 

Electrical Occupations Program IEO) - 41 

Electrical Technology Courses (ELT) - 94 

Electrical Technology Program (EL) - 42 

Electronics Courses (ENT) - 95 

Electronics Technology Program (ET) - 43 

Employment - 11 

Engineer in Training Courses (EIT) - 97 

Engineer in Training Exam Preparation 

(EIT) - 78 
Engineering Drafting Courses (EDT) • 93 
Engineering Drafting Technology Program 

(ED) - 44 
English Courses (ENL) - 97 
Environmental Science Courses (ESC) • 98 
Exam Preparation - 78 

Engineer in Training - 78 

Real Estate - 78 

Facilities - 8 

Faculty - 140 

Final Examinations - 128 

Financial Aid - 11 

Fitness and Lifetime Sports Courses 

(PED) ■ 98 
Floriculture Courses (FLR) - 100 
Floriculture Program (FL) - 45 
Food and Hospitality Courses (FHD) - 100 
Food and Hospitality Management Program 

(FH) - 46 
Forest Technology Courses (FOR) - 101 
Forest Technology Program (FRI - 47 
Full-Time Students - 9, 119 

General Equivalency Diploma (GED) - 4 
General Studies Program - 73 
Geography Courses (GEO) • 102 
Geology Courses (GEL) - 102 
German Courses (GER) - 102 
Good Standing for Students Receiving 

Financial Aid - 12 
Government Courses (GOV) - 102 
Grade Reports - 121 
Grading System - 121 
Graduation Fees - 10, 126 
Graduation Requirements - 125 
Graphic Arts Courses (GCO) • 102 
Graphic Arts Program (GA) - 48 

Health Records - 4 

Health Sciences Division (program list) - 16 

Health Services - 8 

High School Graduation • 4 

History Courses (HIS) - 103 

Honor List • 126 

Housing • 8 

Human Service Courses (HSR) - 103 

Human Service Program (HS) - 49 

Index of Courses - 143 
Individual Studies Program - 77 
Industrial Drafting Courses (IND) - 104 
Industrial Drafting Program (ID) - 50 



Industrial Technology Division 

(program list) - 16 
Integrated Studies Division 

(program list) - 16 
International Students, Admission of - 5 

Journalism Courses (JOU) - 104 
Journalism Program (JO) - 51 

Light Duty Diesel Courses (LDD) - 105 
Lycoming Cross Registration - 124 

Machine Tool Technology and Machinist 

General Courses (MTT) - 105 
Machine Tool Technology Program (TT) - 55 
Machinist General and Machine Tool 

Technology Courses (MTT) - 105 
Machinist General Program (MG) - 53 
Management, Business Courses (MGT) - 87 
Mass Communications Courses (MCM) - 106 
Math-Science Emphasis - 76 
Mathematical Computer Science Courses 

(MCS) - 106 
Mathematical Computer Science Program 

(MC) -54 
Mathematics Courses (MTH) - 106 
Medical Terminology Courses (MTR) - 107 

Natural Resources Management Division 

(program list) - 17 
Non-Degree Students - 7, 119 
Non-Traditional Credit - 122 
North Campus - 8 

Nursery Management Courses (NMG) - 107 
Nursery Management Program (NM) - 55 

Orientation - 116 
Ornamental Horticulture Courses 
(FLR, NMG, OHT) - 100, 107 
Outdoor Power Equipment Courses (OPE) - 108 
Outdoor Power Equipment Program (SM) - 56 
Overload Credits - 119 

Part-Time Students - 119 

Petition to Graduate - 126 

Philosophy Courses (PHD - 108 

Physical Education Courses (PED) - 98 

Physics Courses (PHS) - 109 

Placement - 116 

Placement Examinations - 4 

Plumbing and Heating Courses (PLH) - 109 

Plumbing and Heating Program (PL) - 57 

Practical Nursing Courses (NUR) - 110 

Practical Nursing Program (NU) - 58 

Pre- Law Emphasis - 76 

Pre-Medical Emphasis - 76 

Pre-Theological Emphasis - 77 

President's Message - 1 

Printing Program (GP) - 59 

Probation, Academic - 128 

Psychology Courses (PSY) - 110 

Publications - 118 

Quantity Food Production and Service Courses 

(QFP) - 110 
Quantity Food Production and Service Program 

(QF) - 60 

Radiography Courses (RAD) - 111 

Radiography Program (RT) - 61 

Real Estate Courses (RES) - 111 

Real Estate Exam Preparation - 78 

Reenrollment - 6 

Refunds, Withdrawals and - 10, 126 

Registration - 119 

Repeating a "D" or "F" Course - 120 

Retail Management Courses (MKT) - 112 

Retail Management Program (RM) - 62 



Retention Data, Student - 8 
ROTC - 117 

Satisfactory Progress - 12, 119 
Scheduling/ Registration - 119 
Secondary Vocational Program - 131 
Secondary Vocational Programs 

(program list) - 17 
Secretarial it Clerical Studies Courses 

(CLS & SEC) - 112 
Secretarial Courses (SEC) - 112 
Secretarial Office Administration Program - 

Executive (SA) - 63 
Secretarial Office Administration Program - 

Legal (SA) - 63 
Secretarial Office Administration Program - 

Medical (SA) - 64 
Service and Operation of Heavy Construction 

Equipment Courses (SOE) - 113 
Service and Operation of Heavy Construction 

Equipment Program (SO) - 65 
Service Credit - 7 

Social/Cultural/Recreational Activities - 118 
Sociology Courses (SOC) - 113 
Spanish Courses (SPA) - 114 
Special Student - 119 
Special Topics Courses - 80 
Staff - 139 

Student Conduct - 127 
Student Government - 118 
Student Retention Data - 8 
Student Termination - 126 
Student Withdrawal - 127 
Surgical Technology Courses (SRT) - 114 
Surgical Technology Program (ST) - 66 

Technical Illustration Program (Tl) - 67 

Technology Studies Program (TS) - 68 

Terminations, Withdrawals, Refunds - 126 

Tool Design Technology Courses (TDT) - 114 

Tool Design Technology Program (TD) - 69 

Tools - 10 

Transcripts - 10 

Transfer Credit - 7 

Transfer from Another Institution - 7 

Transfer of Credits to Four- Year Institutions - 8 

Transfer Students - 6 

Transportation Technology Division 

(program list) - 17 
Tuition and Fees - 9 
Tuition Deposit - 5, 9 

United States Armed Forces Institute Credit 
(USAFI) - 7 

Veterans Information/ Benefits - 13 

Weekend College - 14 
Welding Courses (WED - 114 
Welding Program (WE) - 70 
Withdrawal From A Course - 127 
Withdrawals From College - 126 
Withdrawals and Refunds - 10, 126 
Withholding Grades - 122 
Wood Products Technology Courses 

(WPT) - 115 
Wood Products Technology Program 

(WD) - 71 
Word Processing Courses (WDP) - 115 
Word Processing Program IWP) - 72 
Work and/or Life Experience Credit - 123 



147 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 1985-86 



FALL SEMESTER 1985 



August 



19-23 



Mon. 


19 


Tue. 


20 


Wed. 


21 


Mon. 


26 


Fri. 


30 



September 


Mon. 


2 


Tue. 


3 


Fri. 


13 



Fri. 27 



October 


Fri. 


11 


Mon. 


14 


November 


Fri. 


1 


Thu. 


28 


Fri. 


29 


December 


Mon. 


2 


Tue. 


3 


Mon. 


16 



@ 



Preparation: Fall Semester/ New Student 
Orientation/ Faculty Preparation 
Convocation/Advanced Placement Testing 
Late Registration (New Students) 
Late Registration (Returning Students) 
Classes Begin 

Last Day to Request Advanced Placement 
Last Day to Add Classes 



Labor Day Vacation 

Classes Resume 

Last Day to Drop Classes without a Grade 

Last Day to Drop Classes with Refund (70% ) 

Last Day to File "Petition to Graduate" For 

December Graduates 



Fall Vacation — No Classes 
Classes Resume 



Last Day to Drop Classes with a "W" 
Thanksgiving Day Vacation 
Thanksgiving Vacation 



Grade 



Thanksgiving Vacation 
Classes Resume 
Last Day of Classes 
Last Day to Drop Classes 



SPRING SEMESTER 1986 






Janua 


ry 


2-7 




Thu. 


2 


Fri. 


4 


Wed. 


8 


Tue. 


14 


Tue. 


28 


Fri. 


31 



February 

Fri. 14 
Mon. 17 
Tue. 18 



March 



Sun. 


16 


Tue. 


18 


Mon. 


24 


Tue. 


25 


Wed. 


26 


Thu. 


27 


Fri. 


28 


Mon. 


31 


May 




Mon. 


5 


Sat. 


10 



Preparation: Spring Semester/ New 

Student Orientation/ Faculty Preparation 

New Student Orientation/Advanced 

Placement Testing 

Late Registration 

Classes Begin 

Last Day to Request Advanced Placement 

Last Day to Add Classes 

Last Day to Drop Classes without a Grade 

Last Day to Drop Classes with Refund (70%) 

Last Day to File "Petition to Graduate" For 

May Graduates 



Winter Vacation or Snow Make-Up 
Staff Development— No Classes 
Classes Resume 



Open House 

Last Day to Drop Classes with a "W" Grade 

Staff Development— No Classes 

Staff Development— No Classes 

Staff Development— No Classes 

Spring Vacation or Snow Make-Up 

Spring Vacation or Snow Make-Up 

Classes Resume 



Last Day of Classes 
Last Day to Drop Classes 
Commencement 



For Information On Administrative Deadlines, Check The 
Appropriate Policy In This Catalog. 



ABOUT THE COLLEGE 

College Philosophy 

We believe in the dignity and worth of all individuals. We believe 
learning is a lifelong process and that all individuals should have 
opportunities for lifelong education. We believe education should help 
individuals develop, to their maximum capacity, technical excellence, 
occupational proficiency, and academic ability. We believe education 
should also provide for personal enrichment. To prosper in a complex 
and changing society, we believe individuals must learn to think 
independently, value logical and tested conclusions, develop problem 
solving abilities, and function effectively with other people. We believe 
that competent performance contributes significantly to individual health 
and happiness and benefits the organizations and communities in which 
individuals work and live. We believe the College is an integral part of the 
community it serves and must respond to identified needs and interests. 
In delivering education services, we believe there is no substitute for the 
pursuit of excellence. 

College Mission 

The Williamsport Area Community College is a public two-year 
comprehensive community college with strong heritage and continuing 
emphasis on vocational-technical skills and knowledge. The College 
serves primarily the state-designated, 10-county Northcentral 
Pennsylvania area. Because of the extensive commitment to hands-on 
occupational programming, the College also serves as a regional, 
national, and international resource. 

The College seeks to implement its philosophy by providing: 
•quality postsecondary occupational and transfer programs and 

services for all those who can benefit, including those who have 

previously discontinued their formal education; 
•quality vocational-technical programs and services for area secondary 

students; 
•accessible full and part-time educational opportunities and services 

which address a wide spectrum of individual needs and abilities 

through varied formats, schedules, geographic locations, and short- 
term courses; 
•educational programming related to economic and employment 

realities; 
•additional and enriched career options through cooperation with 

industry, business, professions, government, and other educational 

institutions; 
•comprehensive programs which integrate communications, math, 

science, humanities, interpersonal skills, reasoning, and physical 

health and safety; 
•opportunity to develop skills needed to enter and succeed in 

programs; 
•continuing opportunities to extend and upgrade skills, knowledge, and 

interests; 
•support for informed decisions using knowledge of abilities, interests, 

and values realized through testing, evaluation and counseling, as 

well as instruction; 
•opportunities to develop personal, social, and cultural dimensions. 

The College affirms that excellence in instruction at reasonable student 
cost is its highest priority. The College is accountable for its mission 
within the limitations of its physical and financial resources. 

College Goals 

GOAL AREA: Vocational Technical Education 

To offer programming which meets the vocational technical education 
needs of students, service area residents, and employers in traditional 
occupations and emerging career fields. 

(continued on other side) 



College Offices are open throughout the fall, winter and spring, except 
on official College holidays, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. During the summer, College Offices are open 7:30 a.m. until 4 
p.m., Monday through Thursday and until 1 p.m. on Fridays. 



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GOAL AREA: General Education 

To ensure that students acquire an introductory knowledge of 
communications and mathematics, and appropriate social sciences, 
natural sciences and humanities in order to facilitate their acquisition of 
the skills and knowledge that will enable them to live effectively in 
society and/or to prepare them for further study. 

GOAL AREA: Developmental Education 

To identify and assess the basic skill levels of all students and provide 
program opportunities to ensure that students develop appropriate 
reading, writing, and mathematics competencies to succeed in college- 
level studies. 

GOAL AREA: Lifelong Education 

To instill in students and service area residents an appreciation for 
learning as a lifelong activity, and to provide programming which meets 
their vocational, avocational, social, and cultural interests. 

GOAL AREA: Counseling and Advising 

To provide counseling services which permit the student to enjoy a 
smooth progression through the recruitment, admissions, career 
identification, and job placement processes and which employ effective 
academic advising and provide the opportunity for professional assistance 
in resolving personal difficulties. 

GOAL AREA: Effective Management 

To provide appropriate opportunities for all College constituencies to 
participate actively in institutional decision-making processes, in the 
accomplishment of institutional objectives and the achievement of 
College goals. 

GOAL AREA: Accessibility and Student Services 

To offer programs and services at affordable costs to students and at 
times and locations which optimize educational accessibility, and which 
meet the special needs of the College's student population. 

GOAL AREA. Staff Development 

To contribute to the quality of instruction and institutional operations by 
providing opportunities for College staff to develop professionally and to 
advance in their fields through the use of a staff development program 
based upon the needs of individual staff members. 

GOAL AREA: Intellectual Orientation 

To provide programming which emphasizes the process skills of inquiry, 
research, problem definition, problem solution, and which encourages 
students to embrace new ideas and ways of thinking. 

GOAL AREA: Student Personal Development 

To develop an atmosphere in which students are encouraged to identify 
personal goals and to develop the means for achieving them through 
fostering in the student a sense of self-worth, self-confidence, and self- 
direction. 

GOAL AREA: College Community 

To foster an atmosphere of the College as a community where lines of 
communication are open and candid and where a strong commitment to 
personal development and to the College's goals is maintained. 

GOAL AREA: Instruction 

To provide a program of instruction which maintains high standards of 
academic performance, which is innovative in the implementation of 
alternative instructional delivery systems, and which actively seeks to 
provide the most modern equipment, facilities, and instructional support 
services for the educational process. 

GOAL AREA: Resources 

To develop the fiscal, human, and physical resources needed to support 
the College's programs and services. 

GOAL AREA: Physical Plant 

To develop and maintain physical facilities that provide an environment 
that is safe, healthful, and conducive to learning. 



^<^^^^:^%^ .; 



CAMPUS MAP 



^ « 



ATC — Automotive Trades Center 

Auto Body Repair 
Automotive Mechanics 
Automotive Technology 
Transportation Technology Office 

DC - Diesel Center 

Diesel Mechanics 
Diesel Technology 

TTC — Technical Trades Center 

Secondary Vocational Programs Office 

TT1 

Secondary Automotive 

TT2&TT3 

Electrical Occupations 

Electrical Technology 

TT4 

Machine Tool Technology 

Machinist General 

MTC - Metal Trades Center 

Welding 

Industrial Technology Office 

GYM — Gymnasium 

Physical Education Er Health 
Intramural Athletics Er College Activities 
Student Health Services 

LRC — Learning Resources Center* 

Advisement & Career Services Center 

Architectural Technology 

Bookstore 

Cooperative Education, Postsecondary 

Developmental Studies &■ Act 101 

Library 

Mathematics/ English Laboratories 

Media Center 

Reading Laboratories 

BTC — Building Trades Center 

Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration 

Carpentry Er Building Construction Technology 

Construction Technology 

Plumbing and Heating 

Construction Technology Office 



LEC — Lifelong Education Center 
Broadcasting 
Dietetic Technician 
Engineering Drafting Technology 
Food & Hospitality Management 
Industrial Drafting 
Quantity Foods 
Recreation Center 
Science Laboratories 
Tool Design Technology 
Student Government Office 
Susquehanna Room (Food Service Area) 
WWAS - Radio 
President 

Associate Academic Dean 
Associate Dean, Educational Services 
College Information & Community Relations 
College Foundation 
Dean, Academic Affairs 
Dean, Administration 
Dean, Development 
Dean, Educational Research, 

Planning Er Evaluation 
Dean, Employee Er Community Relations 
Dean, Student Services 
Executive Assistant for Internal Affairs 
Personnel 

ACC — Academic Center* 

Accounting 

Advertising Art 

Business Management 

Clerical Studies 

Computer Information Systems 

Dental Hygiene 

Electronics Technology 

English 

Graphic Arts 

Human Service 

Journalism 

Mathematical Computer Science 

Practical Nursing 

Printing 

Radiography 

Retail Management 

Secretarial Office Administration 

Surgical Technology 



Technical Illustration 

Word Processing 

Admissions 

Bursar 

Business Er Computer Technologies Office 

Business £t Financial Operations 

Career Options 

Center for Lifelong Education 

Computer Center 

Duplicating Er Mail Services 

Financial Aid 

Health Sciences Office 

Integrated Studies Office 

SPOTLIGHT 

Staff and Program Development 

Student Records 

Veterans' Information 

GS — General Services 

Dean, General Services 
Security 

W — Warehouse 

AVC — Aviation Center 

Aviation Maintenance Technology 
Aviation Technology 

ESC - Earth Science Center 
Agribusiness 
Floriculture 
Forest Technology 
Nursery Management 
Outdoor Power Equipment 
Service & Operation of 

Heavy Construction Equipment 
Wood Products Technology 
Natural Resources Management Office 



"Elevators provide access to the upper floors of 
these buildings. Access to the second floor of 
the Gymnasium and the Lifelong Education 
Center is through the second floor of the 
Learning Resources Center. 



WEST FOURTH STREET 



VINE AVENUE 



ADMISSION & RECORDS ► 



ACC 



□ P 



Stop Light 



WEST THIRD STREET 



• BROAD STREET 




'Under Conslri 



I 6/85 

' SP- Student Parking 



7 MILES 
FROM COLLEGE TO 
AVIATION CENTER 




EARTH SCIENCE CENTER 

ROUTE 15 

NEAR ALLENWOOO. PA 




WILLIAMSPORT 
LYCOMING COUNT' 

AIRPORT 
(MONTOURSVILLEI 



i^^^^^^^^^^y^^^